De: "Raymond Moore" <raym82@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Memories

Date: samedi 1 janvier 2005 6:38

 

Hello everyone,

I have been encouraged by a couple of members of this chat room (bulletin board or whatever it is!) to send you some of my scribblings. About two years ago I joined two Creative Writing Groups and used them to stimulate me to write my memories of earlier days to share with my family. I originally wanted to call the story, "A Different Track", but as the pieces I wrote tended to be a bit piecemeal, I changed the name to "Windows On My Track". Here are two of my windows:

 

Window Three

 

INTERNED BY THE JAPANESE

 

 

 

I waved goodbye to my parents and two younger brothers as I boarded the coastal steamer in Shanghai to go to Chefoo. They were all going back to Hanzhong in Western China where my parents were missionaries. I was six years old and, although none of us knew it, I would not see them again for five years.

 

I was in the care of two female teachers from the Chefoo School, a boarding school for missionaries’ children, and I don't remember having any great emotions of grief at the parting. This is just the way life was. That's how I faced the next five years.

 

The Chefoo School had a reputation for being the "best school east of the Suez". It was run along the lines of an English public school and at times brought to mind aspects of "Tom Brown's Schooldays". It was divided into a Prep School, Girls’ School and Boys’ School.

 

The Prep School was housed in a large two storey building just across the road from the beach. Because of its position on Chefoo Bay, boating and swimming were high on the agenda of school activities. Not in winter though. The Bay sometimes iced over. Winters were cold, but I was not allowed to wear "longs" (i.e. long pants) until I was old enough to go to the Boys' School at about the age of twelve. Meanwhile I wore shorts in the summer and "plus fours" or knickerbockers in the winter. These buckled under the knee and knee length socks were pulled up to meet them.

 

There was keen competition, especially in the Boys School for honours in rowing. The climax of the competition came on Foundation Day when two crews were chosen to compete in the two racing boats called Hero and Leander. The crews consisted of a cox and four and there had been six weeks of eliminations to find the two best crews. Foundation Day was one of those special holidays that became weighed down with tradition. It was celebrated to remember the laying of the foundation stone for the first major building on 15 June 1896. The boat races were always on the afternoon before Foundation Day.

 

As with any good English Public School of that era, we were immersed in such subjects as Greek Mythology and Latin. So we knew that Hero was a priestess of Aphrodite the goddess of love. She lived in Sestos, a town on what is now the Gallipoli Peninsula on one side of the Dardanelles. Leander was a youth who lived across the Dardanelles on the Asian side in what is now Turkey.

 

They fell in love but Hero had made a vow of chastity so could not marry him. Still, every night Leander used to swim the channel between Europe and Asia guided by a lamp in Hero’s tower. One stormy night a high wind extinguished the beacon and Leander was drowned. His body was washed ashore beneath Hero’s tower. In her grief she threw herself into the sea and drowned too.

 

Hero and Leander’s story is inextricably bound up with the sea, and so our two racing boats were appropriately named after them.

 

I accepted Boarding School life and the fact that my parents were 1600 kilometres away in the west of China. I don’t remember having any great longings to be back in Western China. This was where I was, and whatever life doled out to me, that was OK by me. I slept in a dormitory with about a dozen other boys. There was a verandah just outside our window where we used to sneak out after lights out and savour the piquant flavour of fear of being caught by the teachers. We shared a large shower and toilet block, and there were small dressing cubicles which we used to prepare for our showers. However, on a number of occasions, due to some misdemeanour, I was placed in one of these cubicles alone and in the dark until well after lights out.

 

I refused to drink the hot milk that was served into individual cups and had gone cold by morning tea time. On one memorable occasion the skin on the top of the milk caused me to throw up, and spread my breakfast around the floor. But I loved the peanut butter spread on bread, as I could roll it off into a ball and save it in my pocket for future pleasure, usually mixed up with whatever else also occupied the pocket.

 

I was an average student, but excelled in reading and was placed two classes up for reading lessons. I suppose that I was lucky in having my Auntie Jesse living not far away. She was the nurse for the whole school, Prep School, Boys' School and Girls' School. On behalf of my parents, she bought me a full size bicycle for my birthday in 1941, of which I was immensely proud. Unfortunately, later in 1941 she left with a much loved teacher from the Boys' School, David Bentley-Taylor to get married in the Province where my parents worked.

 

I played with other children, but was just as happy by myself. I could be a bit of a loner. Alongside the playing field and running up towards the “San” or Sanatorium – the school hospital - was a shallow gully. When I was alone in that area, I used to duck down into the gully and then stomach crawl along it as far as I could go. The fact that it was “out of bounds” made this exercise doubly delicious.

 

There was a rowing boat placed at the edge of our playing field. It was of course high and dry and someone had supplied a ladder to use as a gangplank in our fantasized activities. One day I was playing with another boy on the boat and I threw the gangplank away as we “cast off”. Unfortunately the gangplank fell back on my fingers and I nursed a painful two fingers on my right hand for a week or two. Fortunately I am left handed. I still have the scars clearly on my index and middle fingers of my right hand over sixty years later.

 

I was playing by myself on the school playing field in early December 1941, after having been at the school for about a year, when I saw a Japanese soldier come in the gate in the wall that surrounded the school compound. He hammered a piece of paper on the gate then strode purposefully in to the school. This was the day after Pearl Harbour, and we were "confined to barracks". This was the beginning of our internment by the Japanese which would not end until August 1945.

 

The Headmaster and other leading business men were taken away by the Japanese, but were returned safely some days later - all except for one business man who died for unknown reasons while being questioned. Otherwise we carried on as usual, but were not allowed to go outside the school compound. It was about this stage that I discovered that the Japanese had stolen my bicycle. This war was becoming really unfair!

 

And then other things changed also. First of all we had to vacate the Prep School building and move to the Boys' School building. This did not last long before we were told that we were to be interned in an old Presbyterian Mission Compound at Temple Hill on the other side of Chefoo. We could not take much with us, and the Japs did not supply any sort of transport for us, so the older teachers went by rickshaw and the rest of us walked.

 

It was four or five miles away, and we had to walk up past "Moore's Fort", the house where my family had holidayed since my grandparents day. We passed the foreign cemetery where my great grandparents were buried. We trudged along the main streets of the town of Chefoo where we were objects of curiosity to the Chinese people as we walked with our Japanese guards flanking our serpentine column.

 

Brought up with a strong belief that God was in control, even in the worst of circumstances, we were soon singing under the leadership of the teachers, a song asserting that "God is still on the throne", much to the incredulity of both our Jap guards and the onlooking Chinese population.

 

Finally we made it up the hill to the compound in Temple Hill where we found that we had been allocated a building for the Prep School. Upstairs we found the boy’s bedroom was small with only enough room for us to sleep with a narrow margin between each bed. The girls had a similar setup in another room. Our room looked out onto a verandah on which a lot of our boxes and trunks were stored due to lack of space inside. We were bothered a few times by Chinese thieves who had climbed the compound wall which was topped with broken glass set in cement, and then climbed to the verandah from outside the building and rifled our possessions.

 

Downstairs, the couple of rooms available were used for lessons and dining. I can’t remember where the kitchen was, but the building was built on a slope and underneath were a couple of small store rooms. The main interest to me in the store room was the bin of chook food – some sort of mash – which I found very tasty.

 

Early the next morning we were called out to the front of the building where we had to learn to count in Japanese, so that we could respond clearly as we numbered off for Roll Call. "Ichi, nee, san, she, gwo, rocku, shichi, hachi, ku, ju." For the next three or four years we were called out for roll call at eight o’clock every morning. The residents of each building gathered in a suitable spot outside in two rows and numbered off. The two Jap guards then consulted their list to check that we were all present and accounted for. They then had to compile an aggregate figure after all the guards had reported their results. Only when this final figure satisfied the camp commandant were we able to go on with our day’s activities.

 

I wasn’t aware of the method by which the food was supplied to us, but once a pig was killed for the school larder. I heard the penetrating squeals as the poor beast ended its life, but did not actually see the deed being done. I did however follow the rest of the process using boiling water to remove the bristles.

 

I don’t remember any other animals in the compound, except on one occasion when a rabid dog came in the gate and ran wildly around the place. There was a fair bit of open space inside the walls, and so it was hard to capture the animal. The Japanese guards threw missiles such as half bricks at it, and at least one of them found its target, making the dog even more demented. I think it eventually found the gate and ran outside into the town. Goodness knows with what awful results.

 

Just inside one stretch of wall was a bamboo grove which extended about five or six metres out from the wall and stretched for about sixty metres. As this compound had once been a Presbyterian College of some sort, someone had built a small, hidden outdoor chapel in this grove. There was a log pulpit and log pews, enough to seat about fifteen people. I discovered this as I explored the place and imagined myself preaching in this beautiful haven. It was the first time that I had thought about what I might be when I grew up, and proved to be prophetic.

 

We were in this make do concentration camp at Temple Hill for almost a year when we were told that we would be moving to a bigger camp at a place called Weihsien. Before the War, the Chefoo School boasted about six or seven hundred students in the three sections, Prep, Boys’ and Girls’ Schools. Many of the parents of students had heeded the warnings or for other reasons had taken their children out of the school and returned to their homeland. So now there were less than three hundred students left altogether and only about a dozen in the Prep School. I don’t know how many teachers were still with us in total, but the Prep School had four lady teachers left.

 

When the time came to move, we packed our things and made our way down to the harbour where a tramp steamer was waiting for us. We climbed on board and found that our quarters were in the hold. We had a raised platform to sleep on either side of a central walkway. There was just enough room to spread out our blankets with almost no space between beds. A bucket was placed in the middle of the walkway for any necessary relief trips during the night. Some sort of makeshift curtain was place half way along to give the girls privacy from us and vice versa. Soon after we set off and while still in the harbour, a small motor boat caught up with us and loaves of bread were delivered for our two day trip around the coast. The baker had been running late and almost missed us.

 

It wasn’t a very pleasant trip. We were on board for two nights and we were glad to reach the harbour in Qingdao the following morning. We were then placed on a train and by late afternoon we were at the station of the walled city of Weihsien. At the station we were put on “buses”. These were tray trucks with low sides and all the luggage was placed on first and then we climbed on top.

 

It was only a few miles to the Weihsien Civil Assembly Centre which was to be our new home until – we knew not when. Soon the camp came into sight. We could see rows of huts and some taller buildings. There was a church and it was all surrounded by a high wall with electrified barbed wire running along the top of it. Here and there were guard towers, and as we approached the entrance we saw Japanese guards standing with their rifles and bayonets ready to welcome us.

 

The Chinese style of gateway had three Chinese characters written across the top of it and later I learned that they said, “Courtyard of the Happy Way”, for this had been another Presbyterian Mission Centre. It was about 200 metres by 150 metres in size and included a church, hospital, rows of small rooms to house the Bible School students, larger buildings for classrooms and staff houses for the American missionaries, teachers and doctors.

 

We drove through the gate and up the incline with what seemed like hundreds of internees standing on either side of the road to witness our arrival. We stopped, with the church and a playing field on our right. We were unloaded and gathered on the playing field while a camp leader read out the instructions about the camp to us and then we were assigned sleeping quarters. We were now a small part of the 2,000 or so people who had been interned in this Concentration Camp called Weihsien.

 

We were taken to one of the larger buildings called Block 24 and down into a very dank basement where we were given beds and bedding of a sort. My bed was a folding camp stretcher which was constructed of a piece of canvas stretched between two rails attached to folding legs. The rails were held apart with a removable wooden crosspiece at each end which kept the whole thing rigid. However on my bed the two cross pieces had been lost and so you could still sleep in it, but it sagged with your weight and the outside rails threatened to close in over the top of you. I actually loved this and found it rather cosy.

 

That room was our home for the first couple of weeks, and in that time two or three of us got “jaundice” as it was then called. There is something appealing about being sick in a boarding school. We were away from our parents and the teachers were mostly spinster missionaries who, having been called by God to work amongst the heathen in China, were then allocated, because of their training, to teach and live with a challenging bunch of missionaries’ children. In all the time that I was in the Chefoo School I do not remember any teacher putting their arm around me or showing any kind of physical affection to me. Except once. That was while we were still in Chefoo and I woke up about 10 or 11 o’clock one night from a nightmare. I must have called out and was obviously upset when a teacher came in to the darkened dormitory and sat on the side of my bed, put her arm around me and hugged me better. That hug stands out in my memory.

 

So being sick was another way of getting some kind of personal attention. I was taken out of my fold up camp stretcher and placed in a large double bed that stood at one end of the room. My skin had gone yellow. I was quickly nauseated by anything that was or looked like it was greasy. I had no energy. I was quarantined from the other children – as far as that was possible in the confined quarters of a prison camp. But I had, from time to time, the undivided attention and care of some of the teachers.

 

Soon after this our small Prep School was allocated more permanent quarters where we stayed for the rest of the War. It was in Block 23 and was on the ground floor. I imagine that it was a teacher’s flat in a former life. Block 23 was a large building with a bell tower in the centre. The front of the building had a long stone flagged verandah along its full length, and one end of this verandah led to a door which gave access to our quarters.

 

When you walked in the door you found yourself in a tiny hallway with a door straight ahead. This led into the teachers bedroom. By that stage in the school’s evolution we were down to three female teachers, Miss Carr, Miss Stark, and Miss Woodward. If you turned left in the small hallway, there were two more doors. The door on the left was the girls’ room. There were five girls left in the Prep School, and in the last room there were nine boys.

 

The boys’ room was a much larger room than the other two. We did not have beds but slept on mattresses on the floor. My bed was just inside the door. Every morning we had to make our beds and roll up the mattresses against the wall because this was the class room and living room during the day. Our trunks were placed in the centre of the room and we sat on these for classes. In that sense life went on as normal, but there were few supplies and we had to use the books which we had been able to bring in with us. Apart from that the teachers were probably most creative in trying to give us as normal an education as possible during those years.

 

I remember using slates and chalk for some subjects and activities such as maths, but we also had a few notebooks which we used until we got to the end of the book, then we turned the book upside down and wrote between the lines. There was a pot belly stove in the middle of the room, but fuel was difficult to get. We were able to scrounge coal dust and, learning from others in the camp, we mixed the dust with dirt and water, then formed them into briquettes. They didn’t burn very well, but had to do.

 

One of the activities I will always remember was the endless pursuit of bed bugs. These were pandemic and their total destruction was a constant fantasy. They seemed to hide in the cracks in the wall plaster during the day, and then when these warm bodies were comfortably settled in their beds on the floor, over would trot this army of bed bugs and proceed to graze all night on the ready supply of blood that was available. If you squashed them in the night, they left streaks of blood on your sheets and a strong and distinctive smell behind them. During the day we would use boiling water and pour it into any available crack, and use other means to block up cracks, but if we were at all successful it was hard to see the results of our efforts.

 

Along one wall of our room was a long bench which held basins and other items for our ablutions. We were able to buy soap from the Japanese, but no toothpaste, so for years I got used to cleaning my teeth with soap. I can still hear the teachers asking us if we had washed our ankles, behind our ears and between our legs. One teacher seemed to find a need to inspect the appendages between these latter items to see that they were clean.

 

We did not have access to much in the way of medical supplies or vitamin supplements. When the medical powers that be figured that we were all deficient in calcium, we collected egg shells, which were dried and powdered. A teaspoonful of this dry, choking powder was swallowed each day for a period. At another stage I was deemed to be anemic and in need of iron. This was supplied by the simple means of collecting rust from old metal and grinding it into a powder and administering it to me in the same way.

 

Day to day life inside a prison compound became normal after a while. We played marbles – “alleys” – in the dust outside, and also hopscotch. I collected labels off food cans that had been thrown away in people’s rubbish bins. It was amazing how many people must have brought in canned food with them. We used some of the larger cans to make small ovens by lining them with mud and cooking minute scones, although I think ‘scones’ is a rather grand name for what actually resulted from this effort. But like a lot of things that children do, the fun experienced during the effort made it well worthwhile, regardless of the result.

 

There were four kitchen/dining room complexes scattered around the camp. One was in the basement of the hospital and was a diet kitchen. The other three were numbered one to three and internees were allocated to one of these for their meals. We went to Kitchen One. I don’t remember the meals much, probably because they were not very memorable. What was memorable was the Menu Board on which the cooks used their creative writing skills to describe the coming meal in the most exotic terms. You would think that you were in the grandest hotel in the land. What was actually served was bread porridge for breakfast, watery stew in the middle of the day, and whatever was left over for the evening meal.

 

I remember mainly the things that broke the monotony. A couple of times we got Red Cross parcels and the main item of interest to me was the powdered milk that we could have. It was only a tablespoonful, but I still remember the beautiful taste of that powder mixed with a little water and eaten a lick at a time from the spoon. I also remember when we actually got pieces of meat you could recognize as meat. It was – I was told later – horse or donkey or some such animal. My fellow Prepites were not very impressed and so I was able to enjoy some extra pieces on that occasion. I think we may have had peanut butter sometime in those three years, because I remember walking around to the little yard behind Kitchen One and finding a man with a meat grinder, carefully grinding peanuts into peanut butter. I talked to him for a while, hoping that I might be lucky enough to get a lick, but it wasn’t to be my lucky day.

 

After breakfast, our teachers felt that we needed to be taught how to be regular, so we were sent off to the communal toilets to empty our bowels. This we did faithfully, and when we returned to our rooms, we would be asked by the teacher on duty, “Did you go?” and if we replied that we had not been able to “go”, then we were told to “Go and try again”, which we did, usually with positive results. These toilets were emptied into a cesspool which was accessed each day by some Chinese farmers who took the contents in wooden buckets carried on a pole across their shoulders – “honey buckets” we called them - to their fields to fertilize the vegetable crops. It always seemed to me to be an excellent and natural recycling process. One of the children in the camp fell in to one of these cesspools due to some tragic mischance. He survived, and the worst long term result of his accident was that he was from then on known as “Cesspool Kelly”.

 

Talk about tragic mischance’s reminds me of some deaths we had in the camp. I remember walking up one of the main streets of the camp and seeing the very spot where a young man had fallen from a tree and been killed just the day before. Bringing death closer to home, was the accident that killed one of the boys in our Chefoo Boys’ School. He had been with the others for the morning roll call near the hospital where they lived, and had jumped up to touch a low electric wire that had been loosened in the wind – possibly as a dare. Unfortunately it was very much alive and he was electrocuted.

 

To an eight or nine year old death was fascinating, repelling and scary all at the same time. When one of the nuns died, she was laid out in the small building that served as a morgue not far from the hospital. I found my way there one day, and as no one was around, I climbed in the broken window and stood and looked at her for quite a while. Later they had an official viewing of the body, and I queued up with the rest and had another look.

 

Eric Liddell the Olympic runner of “Chariots of Fire” fame was in our camp. He spoke at one of our Chefoo church services and told us about the famous episode when he would not run in an Olympic race because it was to be held on a Sunday. He was a truly great man and in my young mind was a true hero. Unfortunately he also died in the camp of a brain tumour, just months before the end of the War. In 2002, my brother Frank and I went to Weifang, as the town is now called. It is a city of some millions of people and is internationally famous as the world kite centre. We found the old camp site which is now the No. 2 Middle School and the only buildings still standing were a couple of the houses where the Japanese had been quartered and the hospital. But in a position just behind where the church used to be and next to the former front gate was an “Eric Liddell Memorial Garden”, which was locked up behind a wall and we were able to get access to it and take some pictures.

 

One night during our internment we were woken up and called out to a roll call as someone had rung the bell which graced the top of our building. We were kept outside until the Japanese were satisfied that no one had escaped. But on another occasion a couple of men did escape over the wall and joined with Government forces outside the camp until the end of the war. They were able to keep the Chinese Government in Chongqing up to date with information about the camp. At the end of the War they came back in with the American liberators and told us some of their adventures.

 

Inevitably the end of the War came. There had been gossip about the War being over, but no one knew for sure what was happening. At times we had seen planes flying very high overhead, and people wondered in the last few days whether they might be American planes. Then on 17 August 1945, about 9:30 am, a plane was heard to circle the camp. I rushed out to see what was happening and could see this front silhouette of a B24 bomber coming towards us at a low altitude. It was coming straight at us with its round body and two engines either side joined by the slim shape of the wings. and then we saw parachutes falling from it. It flew so low that we could see that it was aptly named “The Flying Angel”. We knew this was it.

 

This was the most exciting day of my life. I was 10½ years old and for the first time since December 1941, a month before my 7th birthday, I was going to be free. Seven parachutes floated to the ground outside the camp. There was no doubt about what we had to do. We had to be there to welcome them. It seemed like the whole camp, all 1500 of us, rushed down the incline to the entrance and through the gate, past the Japanese guards who were still standing there with their rifles and bayonets, but obviously unsure how to react. What did it matter. Out in the fields we found the 7 Americans who became instant hero’s. They were carried in on the shoulders of some of the men and soon had things sorted out peacefully with the Japanese. From now on they were in charge, and we were free.

 

By the end of the War, our caloric intake was very low, and so it was with great excitement that over the next few days tonnes of supplies were dropped by parachute just outside the camp. Because the loads were too heavy for the parachutes, many of the drums broke open and the canned peaches and chewing gum were scattered over the ground. At least those were the two items that I noticed and gorged myself on with some dire results. There must have been other items such as army field rations, because, later we were issued with packets of field rations and, on opening mine up I found not only chocolate and biscuits, but also cigarettes. I had only seen these in the mouths of strangers as none of the missionaries smoked. So I couldn’t resist this forbidden fruit and escaped to one of the guard towers, now unmanned, and climbed up the stairs and sat in a corner and tried my first cigarette. I don’t think I suffered very much because I did not know anything about drawback at that time.

 

We followed the Americans around wherever they went, and on one of these “hero sessions”, I was jumping over a bench and my arm got caught between the back rails. “Ouch!” However, such was my excitement and awe at being in the orbit of this newly discovered star, that I ignored it for the rest of the day. In bed that night I began to feel the pain, and late that evening I was taken to the hospital, where they were able to ascertain that I had a greenstick fracture of the Radius and my arm was placed in a plaster cast.

 

So it was that a few days later, six of us whose parents lived in the west of China, were flown out in a bomber which was stacked full of parachutes which had been used in the supply drop. As there were no seats of any kind on board, we spent the trip lolling about on parachutes in comfort, but me with my arm in plaster – a wounded warrior.

 

We were free at last.

 

Window Four

 

GETTING HOME

 

Two days after the end of World War II was the most exciting day of my life. On 17 August 1945, seven American paratroopers landed just outside Weihsien, the Japanese Concentration Camp in which I had spent the last two or three years of my life. I was eleven years old. It was about 9:30 in the morning and we rushed out past our Japanese guards, still standing there with their rifles and bayonets, and the officers with their long samurai swords hanging from their belts and almost touching the ground. They were confused and indecisive. They were still in charge, but the war was over and they knew that. So they stood, ambivalent, watching us rush joyously past.

 

We welcomed the seven servicemen as heroes and brought them into camp, where they quickly took control and set out the boundaries for the Japanese and us. The excitement was coupled with new experiences and general anticipation. We were going home.

 

In the next few days more American bombers flew over and dropped hundreds of parachutes of food and other necessities. These planes had come from Xi’an in Western China, one of the Americans’ main airports in “Free China” We leapt from being beggars whose diet had been not much more than bread and water, to being millionaires, feasting on chocolate and peaches and meat, even though it mostly came out of the ubiquitous khaki American army tins and packets. I smoked my first cigarette, became sick with too many good things too quickly, saw the first drunken European I had ever seen, and broke my arm chasing one of the American heroes around the camp.

 

Meanwhile arrangements were being made to get everyone home. For the majority of the former internees, this meant getting them on to a train to the coastal city of Qingdao, from where they would be catching ships back to their home countries. But for me and the four Taylor children and David Allen, “home” was in Western China where our parents were still living in what had been “Free China” during the War. So, about three or four weeks after the end of the War, the six of us were bundled on to an American transport plane carrying used parachutes back to Xi’an. There were no seats for passengers, so we lolled around on top of these piles of soft parachute silk.

 

When we arrived in Xi’an we were taken to billets at the American barracks where we stayed for a couple of days. We had more new experiences here which generated effects that are with me still. I was given a tube of toothpaste. Up to this time I only remember using soap to brush my teeth. Even now, brushing my teeth with real toothpaste is an evocative experience. They had Coca Cola on tap, and I loved it. Still do. In the evenings we were taken to their outdoor picture theatre, where we sat on canvas director’s chairs and I watched cartoons for the first time. Today I still love to watch cartoons, especially the simpler Mickey Mouse type of cartoon.

 

The four Taylor children were picked up from here by their parents and taken to their mission station. My parents should have been notified that I was here and picked me up also, but this didn’t happen. My parents only lived in South Shaanxi, the same province in which Xi’an was situated, about two days travel by truck over fairly primitive roads. But they were still waiting to be told where I was.

 

My mother writes that they were waiting very impatiently, and finally received a letter from Chongqing saying that a circular had been sent out the day before, explaining to parents what was happening to their children. They never received that circular. Then they received a letter from a friend in Xi’an which said, “I am sorry I missed seeing your Raymond when he passed through here. Some of our folks went out to the airport, but I couldn’t go.” If I had “passed through” Xi’an, then where was I, they wondered.

 

Finally another missionary friend wrote to them saying, “There was great excitement last night when the four Taylor children walked in. Your Raymond would have been with them, but he has been taken on to Kunming with a fractured wrist.” Kunming was in the south of China, 1300 kilometres from Xi’an as the crow flies, but much, much further by road.

 

I flew from Xi’an to Kunming in a bomber called “The Homesick Angel”. Before getting on board, the navigator gave me a small block of chocolate, but unfortunately I became airsick on the trip and, because I had been offered a pull down seat just behind the pilots and opposite the navigator, he ended up with that chocolate and more, over the front of him. I thought he took it very well, and seemed to hold no grudge towards me.

 

At Kunming I was taken to the local mission home belonging to my parents’ missionary society, the China Inland Mission. Here I stayed the night, and my memory of that stay is of being placed in a wing of the building which seemed to be a long way from everyone else. I got up after they had put me to bed and walked out on to a sort of indoor verandah and could see a few adults having a cuppa and talking up the other end. They glanced at me, but nothing more, and I eventually went back into this room and slept alone for the rest of the night. I was not used to being alone as I had lived in boarding school dormitories for the last six years or so.

 

At this stage my parents received a telegram from the missionary in charge at Kunming saying, “Raymond here safe and well. Will send on to Hanzhong or Xi’an as soon as transport is available.” Transport became available almost immediately, once more per kind favour of the American airforce, and I was returned to Xi’an on another bomber, minus my trunk of precious belongings, which I never saw again. The only thing I remember being in that trunk was a piece of brick which I had souvenired as a reminder of Weihsien. Looking back now I think the rest of the contents probably consisted of worn out clothing and maybe some old exercise books and not much else. At the time I felt the loss deeply, but kept it to myself.

 

Back in Xi’an I was left at the airport and there seemed to be no one there to pick me up. A Chinese nurse attached to the army was at the airport and saw me but did not realize who I was until she arrived back in Hanzhong where my mother met her at the Sunday service. Hearing that she had been in Xi’an the day before, my mother asked her jokingly, “You didn’t happen to see a small boy of about 11 with his arm in a sling anywhere at the airport in Xi’an, did you?” “As a matter of fact, there was a boy there fitting that description, but I didn’t know who he was.” Fortunately for me there happened to be a friend of my parents from another mission at the airport who saw me wandering around and asked me who I was. When he discovered that I was the son of his missionary friends, he took me to his home to stay until my father could come and pick me up.

 

After they heard of my arrival in Xi’an again, and after a misunderstanding with an American major who they had hoped would bring me back from Xi’an to Hanzhong by air, my father set off by road to Xi’an. This involved catching a bus from Hanzhong to a place called Baoji where the nearest station was situated on the railway to Xi’an. The “bus” was actually a tray top truck on which everyone’s luggage was stacked and then the passengers rode on top. At Baoji he met by chance a British convoy and discovered that he had gone to school with the major in charge. He explained his situation to the major and arranged with him to wait for a particular train back from Xi’an so that he could give us a lift back to Hanzhong.

 

The reunion with my father was far from world shattering. I was in bed when he arrived and he came in to the room to meet me. My reaction was to duck under the bedclothes and hide myself from him. I have often wondered what the cause of this burst of shyness was.

 

We caught the train to Baoji, where we made our way off the train and out of the station for our rendezvous with the British major and his convoy. They were nowhere to be seen, and when my father enquired, he was told that they had waited until most people were off the train and, because we had been delayed coming out of the station, they thought we were not on board and had left to go on their journey south without us.

 

We left the station dejectedly and made our way around to find somewhere to have breakfast. But amazingly, as we turned a corner, there was a jeep with a British flag flying on the front. My father asked the driver if he was connected with the major and his convoy, and found that he was indeed part of that convoy. He had taken a wrong turning and was now on his way to catch up with the rest of the convoy.

 

The three of us set off down the mountain road, heading in the right direction for home. Instead of a tasty Chinese breakfast from a wayside stall, we ate British army rations from a tin as we drove along. Rounding a corner on the road which was cut out of a steep hillside, we suddenly saw the rest of the convoy ahead of us. There had been a landslide and they were trying to clear a track around it. This done we were on our way again and by late that afternoon the convoy was making its way through the outskirts of Hanzhong. I walked up the path to the mission home and was greeted with great rejoicing by my mother and youngest brother and a little sister I had never seen. My other brother came home from a boarding school in India some weeks later.

 

So I was home and we were a family again. Or were we? My mother writes about this meeting, “There was Raymond, a big eleven year old walking up the path. What a reunion after five long years. But where was my little six year old whom I knew so well? I felt as if I had two boys, one whom I knew and understood, and one whom I hardly knew at all.”

 

 

 

 

 

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Memories

Date: lundi 3 janvier 2005 3:11

 

Thanks to Raymond Moore for his Memories. Since my parents at Weihsien were adults I have not had much input on a child's view of the camp.  I found the Memories very well written and interesting.

Gladys Hubbard Swift

 

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Ray's memoires

Date: mercredi 5 janvier 2005 18:54

 

Dear Ray,

I liked your story --- very much.

I keep on seeing the nearly end of Seven Spielberg's movie: The Empire Of The Rising Sun. Fantastic film. The hero of the story is there amongst many others assembled there by the Red Cross to be picked up by their parents. He is staring into outer space and completely out of phase. His parents find him at last but he has no reaction when they are in front of him. Does he see them? My stomach is in my throat! and my eyes are all wet.

Every one of you Chefoo kids must have experienced that feeling?

We had the privilege of having been interned in Weihsien with our parents. My mother told us more than once that "they" told us (my mom and dad) not to give too much love to their children because you never knew what could happen! --- due to the uncertain times we were living in those days!

Who is "they"?

She never said -------

---

Leopold

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: smithsonian

Date: mardi 11 janvier 2005 18:05

 

Hello,

Many thanks to Susan Strange of the Smithsonian in Washington for sharing her photographs with all of us.

Just click here: http://skynetphotoservice.wistiti.be/Skynet-Id-461241:Smithsonian

You can also access the Smithsonian exhibit:

http://americanhistory.si.edu/militaryhistory/printable/section.asp?id=9&sub=8    

Hope you manage ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Ron Bridge" <rwbridge@freeuk.com>

À: "Weihsien Chatline" <weihsien@topica.com>; "Frances Osborne" <frances@francesosborne.com>

Objet: Leila's Feast

Date: jeudi 13 janvier 2005 10:07

 

Hello all,

Frances the author of Leila's Feast is trying to get back on the chat line could some kind soul advise her of the procedure.

I am up to my eyeballs in another Court case about getting the British Government to honour their promise to British interned

Many thanks

Ron

 

 

De: "Natasha Petersen" <np57@cox.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: help

Date: jeudi 13 janvier 2005 13:54

 

I had two email addresses for Fred Dreggs, one "off" and the other "on".  I tried to delete the "off", but both were deleted.  If someone has Fred's email address, please let me know, and I will get him reinstated.  I am so sorry.

I do not have F. Osborne's email address and therefore cannot put her back on the list.

Natasha Petersen

np57@cox.net

 

De: <cliffnorman@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: help

Date: jeudi 13 janvier 2005 14:01

 

The second one is

            _frances@francesosborne.com_ (mailto:frances@francesosborne.com)

                    Greetings,   Norman

 

De: "leopold pander" <pander.nl@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: help

Date: jeudi 13 janvier 2005 18:14

 

Dear Natasha,

I have two addresses for Greg Leck --- but I don't remember which is the good one!

 

gregleck@epix.net

greg_leck_dvm@hotmail.com

Hope you manage,

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>; <np57@cox.net>

Objet: Re: Leila's Feast

Date: jeudi 13 janvier 2005 23:36

 

To get on the Topica Weihsien network, contact Natasha Peterson --

np57@cox.net  -- who invented this wonderful gift to all of us.

Mary Previte

 

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>; "Paul-Emile Lagasse" <paul-emile.lagasse@laposte.net>

Objet: The making of noodles,

Date: vendredi 14 janvier 2005 10:59

 

From Emmanuel Hanquet;

 

Making noodles in Weihsien Camp

 

The last pages of the Weihsien-Topica chat bring in memory the work I did with Langdon Gilkey and Robbins Strong during the spring of 1944 in Weihsien Camp.

 

            It must have been about then that we tried to improve the diet of the prisoners. In a small room not far away from Kitchen 1, there was a machine looking like a big wrangler, that is to say a big wheel that moved two cylinders turning opposite each other. The cylinders were engraved with small circles. A fellow prisoner in charge of the Kitchen apparatuses had discovered that it might be a noodle-making machine, but how could we use it?

 

            The first trial was unsuccessful: in a wooden box of approximately one square foot in size, we put flour and, working it with our hands and rolled up sleeves, we added water to the mixture, little by little. Then we tried to introduce the sticky agglomerate into the cylinders while one of us was turning at the wheel. Sorry, it adhered to the cylinders and nothing resembling to noodles came out of the process.

 

            We tried again and again, adding less water and finally got small lumps of flour very light, just like flakes, that could be introduced lightly between the cylinders and finally we produced the desired noodles.

 

            The team that operated was working from 9 to 12 every morning and had to provide noodles to the three kitchens, a different one every day. We were Reverends, or would be, and from the beginning, started an ecumenical work, I, being a Catholic priest and the others belonging to the American Board Mission. We became friends and called each other by our first name, i.e. Langdon, Robbins and Manu.

 

            Years later, when I was living in Leuven (Louvain), I had the visit of R. Strong on his way to Geneva where he was assigned to the Bureau Oeucemique Des Eglises. I returned the visit the following year and Robbins was very kind to introduce me to his co-workers, while having a cup of tea together.

 

            I hope that this paper may reach Tracy Strong (mentioned on page 106 of the Topica-archives) whose birth in Weihsien I quite remember.

 

            With best regards to all friends of the Weihsien-Topica.

 

Emmanuel Hanquet.

 

 

De: "Tracy Strong" <tstrong@weber.ucsd.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>; "'Paul-Emile Lagasse'" <paul-emile.lagasse@laposte.net>

Cc: "Jeannie Strong" <strongjr@whidbey.com>; "John and Sarah Strong" <jstrong@bates.edu>

Objet: RE: The making of noodles,

Date: vendredi 14 janvier 2005 15:52

 

Cher monsieur le prêtre Hanquet -

 

Quite a theological and ecumenical group of cooks.

 

What a wonderful story you have made available!  I will forward it to my sister (Jeanne, born in Oberlin in 1945) and john (born in Tungzhou –not sure of the transliteration -- in 1948°.  Many thanks.

 

On another matter: my mother, Kitty Strong, told me a story to the effect that after I was baptised (Protestantly, naturally), a nun, fearing for my soul, sneaked me away and baptised me as a Catholic.  My mother, if I read her tone right, still remembered being upset at this.  If anyone knows anything about this, I would be curious to hear it.

 

Tracy Strong

 

Where are you living now, M. Hanquet?

 

Tracy B. Strong

Professeur et directeur, Centre d'études

Université de Californie</>

18, quai Claude Bernard

69365 LYON France

EAP Phone: (011-33)(0) 4-72-73-48-29</>

Tel. domicile: 04 78 37 58 73

Mobile: 06 21 56 78 34</>

  _____ 

 

De: "Frances Osborne" <frances@francesosborne.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Langdon Gilkey

Date: vendredi 14 janvier 2005 19:05

 

Happy New Year! I am trying to retrace Langdon Gilkey, whom I contacted earlier this year. Please can anyone help me?

 

De: "Frances Osborne" <frances@francesosborne.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: New book on Weihsien

Date: vendredi 14 janvier 2005 19:10

 

I just wanted to post a message to say that I have just had published a book about a Weihsien internee, my great-grandmother, Lilla Casey, who wrote a recipe book for new brides whilst interned - the book is now in the Imperial War Museum in London. She was born Lilla Eckford in Chefoo in 1882 and attended the school with her identical twin. The book tells the true story of an "ordinary" woman's struggles through love and war in treaty port China and India, to where her first husband took her. I have had some very encouraging reviews in everything from the New York Times, USA Today and Vogue - not to mention the British and Asian press. The book is called LILLA'S FEAST. It is published by Doubleday in the UK, NZ, Australia, South Africa and Canada. In the US the publisher is Ballantine. It has been translated into Dutch, Italian and Spanish and can be ordered from all bookshops - if it isn't on the shelves. If any of you have seen it, I would love to hear from you.

 

Frances

 

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Langdon Gilkey

Date: vendredi 14 janvier 2005 19:53

 

Hello Frances --

It's great to hear of the success of your book, Lilla's Feast.  Haven't got my copy yet, but look forward to getting  one in the near future.

Regarding Langdon Gilkey -- I expect you know he passed away towards the end of last year.  This is the address I reached him on, and I'm certain his wife would be happy to help you if she can:

Dr. Langdon Gilkey,

123 Cameron Lane,

Charlottesville, VA 22903. 

Phone: 434-293-3949. 

At the time of our correspondence, several years ago, he was lecturing/working at the Georgetown University Theology Department several days a week.

Once again -- congratulations on the book.

Kindest regards -- Pamela

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Langdon Gilkey

Date: samedi 15 janvier 2005 0:46

 

Langdon's Gilkey's address:

    123 Cameron Lane,  Charlottesville, VA,   USA  22903

    Phone:  809-293-3949

Mr. Gilkey died recently.

    Mary Previte

 

 

De: "Frances Osborne" <frances@francesosborne.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Langdon Gilkey

Date: lundi 17 janvier 2005 11:06

 

Dear Pamela,

I am so pleased to hear from you. You were supposed to have been sent a book by my publisher months ago. Please send me your address again and I shall have another sent out asap. I hope you enjoy it.

Frances

 

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Langdon Gilkey

Date: mardi 18 janvier 2005 17:45

 

Dear Frances --

Good hearing from you again.  Forget your publisher. I believe in buying books -- that's how we writers make it in this world.  Guess I can find it on www.amazon.com  -- the only thing is, it won't be signed by you.

Have a great day -- Kindest regards, Pamela

 

 

De: "Frances Osborne" <frances@francesosborne.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Langdon Gilkey

Date: mardi 18 janvier 2005 17:51

 

I'd love to send you a signed copy - send me your address

Frances

 

 

De: "Frances Osborne" <frances@francesosborne.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Langdon Gilkey

Date: mardi 18 janvier 2005 17:56

 

Sorry that last email was for Pamela Masters, who helped me with Lilla's Feast - I don't have that many copies to give away, sadly.

Frances

 

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Langdon Gilkey

Date: mardi 18 janvier 2005 18:10

 

Hi Frances --

Can't turn down such a kind offer.   My address is -- 3001 Camino Heights

Drive, Camino, California 95709-9508, USA

Sass and Serendipity, the sequel to The Mushroom Years, will be out next month, and I think you'd enjoy it.  It's a story of survival...again -- only this time, in the US of A!  If you'd send me your physical address, I'd love to reciprocate.

Also, could you let me have your personal e-mail address so we can communicate one-on-one?  I see mine is at the end of your Weihsien Topica message, but I didn't find yours on any of our email.

All the best, fond regards -- Pamela

 

 

De: <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet:

an unpublished account by a Mrs. potter

Date: mardi 18 janvier 2005 21:51

 

Apparently I was kicked off the list about 12 months or so ago.

 

I'm busy reading the old posts right now starting in January 2004 and will post my comments over the next few days.

 

Kay mentioned "an unpublished account by a mrs. potter"  I read this in November 2002 - she was a captain of the sewing room.

 

The account has some serious falsehoods in it. She claims Chinese guerillas often invaded the camps, and murdered Japanese sentries. 

Sometimes the sentries tried to seek refuge in internee's rooms, so they barricaded the doors.

 

I've read enough accounts now to realize that this just didn't happen.

 

I did find a wonderful poster for the sewing room.

 

Greg

 

 

De: <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: CAC school exams

Date: mardi 18 janvier 2005 22:04

 

Pamela Masters wrote:

"I'd love to learn the saga of how all our exam papers got to England and got graded. Does anyone out there know this story?"

 

Not much of a story, really.  Virtually every camp, with the exception of Canton and Lincoln Avenue, had very organized schools.  Teachers made up the exam questions for the Cambridge Exams.  The tests were collected and saved.  At the end of the war they were mailed to the UK.  The regency boards there agreed to accept the test results as bona fide results.  Students who passed were mentioned in both the Shanghai and London papers.  Some, by virtue of their scores, were also exempt from the London matriculation exams.

 

 

De: <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Repatriation from China

Date: mardi 18 janvier 2005 22:34

 

Pamela Masters wrote: "I have no direct evidence regarding the swap ratio of Japanese to Americans, but I heard it was considerably higher than 4 to 1"

 

It was a strictly one ot one ration.  The Japanese initially tried to get better than a 1:1 exchange but were rebuffed by the British Foreign Office and the Special Division of the US State Department.  There was a lot of "horse" trading going on, though.  The Allies refused to repatriate Japanese pearl divers from Australian internment, because of their specialized knowledge of the coastline.  At the last moment, the Japanese pulled a number of Americans off the repatriation list in September, 1943, including adventurer Hilaire du Berrier and Paul Hopkins, president of China Power and Light.

 

The biggest problem for the Allies is that there were so many more Americans and Britons than Japanese to be exchanged.

 

I've read many, many first hand accounts of repatriation, both published and unpublished, from the Italian liner the TSS Conte Verde, which was "like a cruise ship" to the Teia Maru, which, was very difficult.

 

 

De: <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Tipton and Hummel

Date: mardi 18 janvier 2005 22:55

 

David Birch wrote:

 

Re. Tipton and Hummel:

Did these fellows really accomplish anything worth while?

 

I've seen some of the secret documents in archives regarding the communications Tipton and Hummel had with Allied intelligence in Chungking.

 

They were instrumental in getting desperately needed items, including drugs, smuggled into camp.  These benefited everyone.

 

The Swiss Consul also helped with the delivery of medical items.

 

 

De: <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Hersey in Weihsien

Date: mardi 18 janvier 2005 23:02

 

Norman Cliff wrote: "I have not researched the matter as you have, but I believe that Hersey was genuinely in Weihsien Camp."

 

Absolutely not.  I have personally dug through over a half a dozen copies of Weihsien nominal rolls, from 1943 to 1945, in US, UK, and Japanese archives.  He was not an internee there, unless Hersey is a pseudonym.

 

 

De: <cliffnorman@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Hersey in Weihsien

Date: mardi 18 janvier 2005 23:06

 

My statement has long been disproved.  Stanley Nordmo has shown  conclusively that the Hersey story was based on information given to him by some  5 Weihsienites.  He combined their accounts into one story.

                Norman  Cliff

 

 

 

De: <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Robbins Strong

Date: mardi 18 janvier 2005 23:08

 

During my last visit to the National Archives I came across a report written by Tracy Strong's father about the situation in China.  I didn't know at the time Tracy was a Topica member.

 

 

De: "Greg Leck" <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Hersey in Weihsien

Date: mardi 18 janvier 2005 23:12

 

I saw that as I read further along in the archives.  I'm just now up to November.

 

Greg

 

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: CAC school exams

Date: mercredi 19 janvier 2005 2:59

 

Thanks a million.  I always wondered when and how they were mailed.  As we got our results quite soon after liberation, I thought they'd been sent home to England before the war was over.

Pamela Masters

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Tad Nagaki's 85th birthday

Date: vendredi 21 janvier 2005 1:25

 

Hello, Everyone:

 

    Weihsien rescuer Tad Nagaki will celebrate his 85th birhday on January 25.  If you'd like to send a greeting, his address is 5851 Logan Road,  Alliance, NE 69301 

 

Tad was the Japanese-American interpreter on the August 17, 1945, rescue mission.  Mary Previte

 

 

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Langdon Gilkey

Date: vendredi 21 janvier 2005 3:59

 

Hi!  Langdon Gilkey died November 19, 2004 in Charlottesville, VA.  I have obituaries from the New York Times, Washington Post and Joyce Cook of Weihsien EMail on 12-22-04.  Let me know if you want copies besides Joyce's.  Gladys Hubbard Swift, ed. of "Tungchow Re-Collected". (There will be an obit in TR-C #65 in February, largely from Washington Post. )

 

PS  I have a copy of Lilla's Feast, given me by a friend, which I am reading with great interest!  GHS

 

 

De: <cliffnorman@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Langdon Gilkey

Date: vendredi 21 janvier 2005 8:55

 

Yes please, Gladys,    Norman  Cliff.

 

 

De: "Mahlon D. Horton" <berean@lincsat.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Tad Nagaki's 85th birthday

Date: mardi 25 janvier 2005 1:25

 

Thank you so much for reminding us.   Audrey Nordmo Horton

 

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: "Paul-Emile Lagasse" <paul-emile.lagasse@laposte.net>

Objet: Re: The making of noodles,

Date: mercredi 26 janvier 2005 18:11

 

By snail-mail from Father Hanquet

to: Tracy Strong,

 

It is very pleasant to hear about the children of R. Strong, whom I considered as a friend and an excellent pitcher in the ball game of Weihsien Camp.

About your baptism as a Catholic by a nun in the camp, she certainly kept the news secret. What she did seems overzealous today. There were only 4 nuns left in the camp at that time.

I live at: 1/201 Rue des Buissons, 1348 Louvain-La-Neuve, Belgium.

Very glad that you teach in Lyon, France. Unfortunately I do not travel anymore. Otherwise I would certainly pay you a visit.

Very friendly yours,

Emmanuel Hanquet.

 

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Courtyard Of The Happy Way Camp

Date: jeudi 10 février 2005 11:19

 

Hello,

From Norman Cliff's scrap-books: the Chinese version of "Courtyard of the Happy Way-Camp"

Click on: http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/index.htm

Click on: the "Log-Book"

Click on: the latest entry (a PDF-file)

--- on the new image, click again on the PDF symbol and you should be able to read the 35 pages, --- all in Chinese.

As it is quite a big file, so --- I shall leave it on the web-site for more or less two months --- the time for you to print it.

Hope you like it!

Best regards,

Leopold.

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: 60th anniversary of the death of Eric Liddell in Weihsien

Date: samedi 19 février 2005 19:22

 

Dear Chefoo & Weihsien friends and colleagues;

 

This Monday, 21st, February will mark the 60th anniversary of our beloved hero Eric Liddell's passing.

 

You will be interested to know that Pure Gold has been translated into Chinese in advance of Beijing Olympics '08. The attached file gives the English version of a Foreword I was asked to write for the Chinese edition..

 

I feel deeply indebted for the tremendous impact Eric had in my life. What a model he was to so many of us in Weihsien! 60 years ago he passed the baton to us.

 

Your brother in His service,

 

James H. Taylor III

 

 

De: "Dawei Beard" <phoenix7788@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: 60th anniversary of the death of Eric Liddell in Weihsien

Date: dimanche 20 février 2005 0:23

 

Hullo everyone,

This is David Beard 'surfacing' after a long time lying low. I think many of us would like to read the English version of the Foreword which James Taylor was asked to write for the Chinese edition of 'Pure Gold', especially since most of us are unlikely to be purchasing the book in its Chinese form.Could Mary Previte be persuaded to send us the English version of the Foreword, or could James Taylor oblige?

On my visit to Weifang on 13.09.03 to be interviewed by the 'Lawsuits for the Future' TV production crew from Jinan (covered in a posting to Topica later that month), I presented them with a copy of 'Pure Gold'. Hopefully they have made good use of it in the final documentaries of a series  on the Japanese War of Aggression against China, beginning with the Shenyang (Mukden) Incident in 1931 and ending , as many of us know from personal experience, in August 1945. This final series is due to be screened on China National TV this year, it being the 60th anniversary of the end of hostilities.

I still remember back on 13.09.03 when I was taken to the Eric Liddell MemorialGarden. As I stood by the Scottish granite monument erected there in his memory, I felt deeply moved by a sense of the historical significance of the site and spoke to the gathered Jinan film crews and local TV crews about Eric Liddell's exceptional quality of life in Weihsien Camp and of the privilege of being in his 1944 Bible Class prior to his passing on 21.02.45.

It's great to know that Eric Liddell's story will be read by many Chinese in their own language in these days when the Olympic fervour will be building up in China prior to 2008.

David Beard

 

 

 

De: "leopold pander" <pander.nl@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: 60th anniversary of the death of Eric Liddell in Weihsien

Date: vendredi 25 février 2005 13:06

 

Dear David,

Try this link:

http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/NormanCliff/people/individuals/Eric01/PureGold/txt_foreword.htm

or go to http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/index.htm  and click on

"From: James H.Taylor" in the left frame.

Hope you manage,

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Letter from China

Date: mercredi 2 mars 2005 11:46

 

>At 5:27 AM -0500 3/2/05, Gladys Swift wrote:  This letter came from >Sui Shude of Weifang People's Government, China.  I am forwarding >the letter to the Weihsien group:

>>

>>I just finished reading of the whole edition on the net "CHINA >>BORN" By Gladys McMullan Murray, the English version. Several times >>my eyes get wet with tears. It is a touching family story with good >>language.

>>

>>The year of 2005 is the 60th anniversary of the victory of the

>>World Anti-Fascist War and Chinese Anti-Japanese War, also, is the

>>60th anniversary of the liberation of the Japanese Weihsien

>>Concentration Camp internees. With the approval of the China

>>Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Shandong Provincial People's

>>Government, Weifang People's Government will hold commemorative

>>activities in Weifang in August at the original site of the

>>Weihsien Concentration Camp.

>>

>>The Office of Foreign Affairs of Weifang People's Government kindly

>>formed a Commemorative Activities Organizing Committee and it is

>>intrusted to contact and collect the Weihsien Concentration Camp

>>Friends and their relatives to a list. We are even planning a trip

>>to the U.S., Canada and some other countries to visit some of the

>>camp internees or their family to get more detailed story of their

>>camp life under the Japanese guns 60 years ago to full-fill that

>>part of history, for making the commemorative activities rich and

>>success. And we would like to invite as many camp friends and their

>>relatives to attend the commemorative event in this August in

>>Weifang, China.

>>

>>It is highly appreciated if you can infom us as many people

>>concerned to the Weihsien Concentration Camp as well as their names

>>and contact information. Then we can send them invitations or we

>>can go and visit and talk to them in their homes.

>>

>>We are looking forward to your answer as well as the list of people

>>you might know that related to the Japanese Weihsien Concentration

>>Camp, no matter which part of the world they are in.

>>

>>Our best regards and hope to see you, either in your home. Or in

>>Weifang China.

>>

>>Sui Shude

>>Office of Foreign Affairs,

>>Weifang People's Government, China

>>Address:

>>Room 1401, 99 East Shengli St.,

>>Weifang, Shandong Province,

>>P. R. China   Post Code: 261061

>>E-mails:

>> Weifangfanyi@yahoo.com.cn 

>> Suishude@sohu.com 

>> emailshude@yahoo.com.cn

>>Tel: 0086-536-8789858

>>Fax:0086-536-8789850   0086-536-8233692

>>Contact:

>>Mr. Sui Shude   Mr. Li Yuejin

 

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Weihsien Movie

Date: mercredi 2 mars 2005 16:46

 

 

Thanks, Gladys, for the wonderful letter from China.  Looks like our "reunion" is already being planned for us.

 

I've lost the email address for the person who is writing a screenplay about Weihsien.  His name is Duane something, and I know he communicated with several people, including Mary and Gladys.

 

Can one of you send it to me?

 

Thanks.

 

Donald

 

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Letter from China

Date: mercredi 2 mars 2005 21:11

 

Thank you Gladys for sharing with us this wonderful letter from Mr. Sui Shude of Weifang!  How I wish I could be in a position to travel to Weifang (Weihsien) this August to take part in the special commemoration of the liberation of the Japanese Concentration Camp at Weihsien sixty years ago! It is truly heartwarming to learn that there are people in the government of the city even now who care enough to hold a special commemoration six decades after our release!

 

Please pass on my deep appreciation to Mr. Sui Shude!

 

Warmest regards,

 

David Birch

Former Internee in the Weihsien Concentration Camp

 

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: <suishude@sohu.com>

Objet: Fw: from Weifang

Date: vendredi 11 mars 2005 23:44

 

 

TO: Weihsien group moderator,

 

 

Sui Shude is the government official who is setting up the memorial celebration of the 60th anniversary of the liberation of the Weihsien camp and would like to be able to communicate efficiently with former internees.

 

Please add Mr. (or Ms.) Sui to the group list.

 

Thank you.

 

 

Don Menzi

 

 

De: "Sui Shude" <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: try from Weifang

Date: lundi 14 mars 2005 7:30

 

I am trying to get me on the list. Trying now.

 

 

Sui Shude

 

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: try from Weifang

Date: lundi 14 mars 2005 8:11

 

 

 

Mr. Sui,

 

I have received the email that you sent to the weihsien@topica.com list, so you must now be a full member of the group now.  I am sure that the other people in the group will be glad to welcome you, as a representative of the Weifang government who is preparing an official ceremony in memory of the liberation of the camp. 

 

In the archives of the group at Topica.com you will find many memories of that liberation already written down.   As a member of the grojup you should be able to look at them whenever you are ready.

 

Also, one member of the group - Leopold Pander - has collected the emails from several years - hundreds of pages - and if I may speak on his behalf, I am sure that he would be glad to send them to you.

 

Again, we welcome you warmly.

 

Donald Menzi

 

 

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: try from Weifang

Date: lundi 14 mars 2005 10:01

 

Dear Mr. Sui,

Please be welcome to click on this link:

http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/index.htm

Compared to other web-sites it is "amateur work". Many former internees have helped me to gather all the information, texts, documents, paintings, photographs, sketches, etc... A wonderful team-work. As Donald has just written: many hundreds of pages.

Best regards,

Leopold

 

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: try from Weifang

Date: lundi 14 mars 2005 17:11

 

Welcome Sui Shude to our Weihsien Topica group.  We look forward to more information regarding the celebrations in Weihsien/Weifang.

~Dwight W. Whipple

 

 

De: "Sui Shude - Chinese govt." <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: From Weifang China

Date: vendredi 18 mars 2005 9:21

 

Dear Friends on the List,

 

I am not sure if I am on the list, or if everybody can read my message now.

 

Sui Shude

from Weifang

 

Emails:

suishude@sohu.com

emailshude@yahoo.com.cn

 

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: From Weifang China

Date: vendredi 18 mars 2005 9:27

 

Hello,

Just got your message out here, in Belgium.

All seems to work perfectly!

Best regards,

Leopold

 

 

De: "Sui Shude - Chinese govt." <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Date: vendredi 18 mars 2005 9:33

 

Dear Friends on List,

 

First of all let me introduce myself: Sui is my family name and Shude is my given name, so my friends usually call me Mr. Shude.

 

I started to know and study the Weihsien Concentration Camp story in 1986 when I was a English-speaking tour guide in Weifang after I graduated from university. As a tour guide, I needed to know everything about this city, so the Weihsien Camp information came into my mind since then. And I guided many foreign English-speaking tourists/internees to the place, which is now a high school and a hospital, and give my English introduction to them (I had thought I knew more).

 

Oh! Got to leave the office now. Write later.

 

Sui Shude

 

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet:

 Re: 60th Anniversary Weihsien Liberation

Date: samedi 19 mars 2005 0:42

 

Dear Mr. Sui --

If you are getting together a list of people who will be attending the 60th Anniversary of our liberation from WeiHsien Prison Camp, please put my name on the list.  May I also bring my daughter and my grandson?

My name is Pamela Masters (Pamela Simmons in the prison camp), and my daughter is Gillian Thomas; her son's name is Dakota Lee Thomas.

We look forward to further communication with you, and thank you for all you're doing.

Sincerely,

Pamela Masters

 

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: From Weifang China

Date: samedi 19 mars 2005 0:51

 

Dear Mr Sui Shude,

 

It seems that you are indeed on our list and I think that is wonderful!

Welcome, good friend!

David Birch

Former Weihsien Internee

 

 

De: "George Kaposhilin" <gkapo@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: From Weifang China

Date: samedi 19 mars 2005 11:24

 

I can read your message so you are OK to communicate to us your program for 2005

 

 

De: "Tracy Strong" <tstrong@weber.ucsd.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: From Weifang China

Date: samedi 19 mars 2005 20:55

 

Dear Mr Sui -- indeed you are on the list

Tracy Strong

(born in camp in 1943)

 

 

De: "Sui Shude - Weifang China" <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: From Shude Weifang

Date: dimanche 20 mars 2005 11:05

 

Dear Friends,

 

I am so glad to be a new member on the topica discussion lists. My special thanks to Donald Menzi, Gladys Swift, Natasha Petersen, John Grant, Nicky & Leopold and other friends, who helped much to put me on the lists and offers the internee list and others.

 

My name is Sui Shude, Sui is my family name and Shude is my given name, so my friends usually call me "Mr. Shude". The following is who I am:

 

I got to know the Weihsien Concentration Camp story in 1986 when I was a English-speaking tour guide in Weifang International Tourism Company after university graduation. As a tour guide, I needed to know everything about this city. I gave my English introduction to many tourists/internees visiting the Weihsien Camp place, which is now part of a high school and a hospital.

 

In 1995, I was the manager of the International Dept of Weifang International Tourism Company. At the beginning of August that year, 6 people contacted me for coming to visit Weifang for the 50th anniversary celebration of the liberation of the Weihsien Camp.

 

With the president of the company, I wrote a report to the local government for further instructions. The government paid much attention on the case and arranged the celebration in the Weifang 2nd High School--the former Weihsien Camp site in the morning of August 17, 1995, the vice-mayor of the city as well as some other leaders of the government, also the group representatives gave speeches on memorizing the victory of China Anti-Japanese War and the liberation of the Weihsien Concentration Camp. Nearly 1,000 people attended the ceremony together with many reporters and medias.

 

The ceremony was held on the sports-field of the high school, which is also called: "Eric Liddell Sports-field" since 1991.

 

I was also one of the interpreter for the ceremony and I still have the documents, the name-list of the visitors, some pictures of the event and a copy of a book "A Song of Salvation at Weihsien Prison Camp" by Mary Taylor Previte. 

 

The people came to the celebration were:

 

Theodore Bazire --(UK)

Neil Yorkston --(UK)

Estelle(Cliff)Cowley --(South Africa)

Ron Cowley --(South Africa)

Anne Yorkstone --(Canada)

Ruth Yorkston --(Australia)

 

Unfortunately I lost contact with all members of this group!???

 

In 1999, I changed to work in the Office of Foreign Affairs in Weifang.

And still, I do part-time job on organizing and guiding tours for American and European tour groups visiting all over China. Sometimes I escort Chinese visiting abroad. I have visited Austria, Switzerland, Italy, France, Netherlands, The U.K., Australia, New Zealand. Life is busy but full of interests.

 

Right now I am entrusted to contact and collect former internees and their families on a info-list, for the planned celebration in August this year of the victory of China Anti-Japanese War and the liberation of the Weihsien Camp, I hope I can find back old friends and get to know more new, to enrich my information of the Weihsieners' Camp stories, as well as their status now. It will be a big job, but with the kindliest help of friends on the lists, I am sure it will be a good done.

 

My best regards and looking forward to your contacts and suggestions!

 

Sui Shude

 

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: From Shude Weifang

Date: dimanche 20 mars 2005 20:26

 

Welcome to our group, Mr. Shude.

 

    You'll find that our memories, articles, and pictures provide the most complete collection in the world of the Weihsien Civilian Assembly Center.

 

    Mary Taylor Previte

 

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Weihsien group

Date: dimanche 20 mars 2005 22:45

 

The address which goes to all the Weihsien group is < weihsien@topica.com  >   You are on this address list.  You will be getting some letters.  Gladys

 

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien group

Date: lundi 21 mars 2005 2:25

 

Thanks so much, Howard!  I printed it out and am now wrapped in nostalgia. It was a fun car, and whenever we double-dated, the gals had to sit in the back seat and my hair got blown to hell! Maybe that's why I don't have such a soft spot for it...Pamela

 

 

De: "Frances Osborne" <frances@francesosborne.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: To Sui Shude - books on Weihsien

Date: lundi 21 mars 2005 13:04

 

Dear Mr Shude,

I think I may be able to help you a little with a story or two. My great-grandmother, Lilla Casey, was interned in Weihsien and whilst there she wrote a fantasy cooking and housekeeping book for new brides - this is now held in the Imperial War Museum in London. I have written her story, which is also the story of the Weihsien camp and westerners in China. It was published a few months ago in several countries around the world and has been translated into Dutch, Italian and Spanish. Its title is LILLA'S FEAST.

The principal publishers are Doubleday and Ballantine. If you have difficulty obtaining a copy, let me know.

There are also several members of this internet group who have written their own FIRST_HAND accounts of their time in Weihsien. In particular Norman Cliff, Courtyard of the Happy Way and Pamela Masters' The Mushroom Years - there are even more books written by Weihsien internees who are no longer with us such as Langdon Gilkey's Shantung Compound and David Michel's A Boy's War - I can give you more titles and I am sure that discussion group members can add to these.

I am also interested in participating in anything you might organize.

With very best wishes,

Frances Osborne

frances@francesosborne.com

 

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Oops...I goofed!

Date: lundi 21 mars 2005 19:51

 

Sorry everyone! 

Somehow, comments meant for the graphic artist illustrating the cover for my latest book, Sass & Serendipity, got routed incorrectly.

If anyone's interested, the artist wanted to put my 1949 Packard convertible on the cover, and I nixed it.

Have a great day -- Pamela

 

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Screenplay about Weihsien

Date: mercredi 23 mars 2005 3:27

 

 

Does anyone have the email address for the person who is writing a screenplay about Weihsien, based on Gilkey's book.  He may even be on this list.  His first name is Wayne, and I last heard from him about nine months ago and have lost his email since then.  If you've got it, please send it to me.

 

Thanks.

 

 

De: "C. Wayne  Mayhall" <solomon110@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Screenplay about Weihsien

Date: mercredi 23 mars 2005 4:24

 

Hi, Donald,

 

It's Wayne Mayhall. How are you?

 

 

 

De: "Sui Shude - Weifang China" <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: A Letter From Weifang China

Date: jeudi 7 avril 2005 8:34

 

A LETTER TO

THE FORMER WEIHSIEN CONCENTRATION CAMP RESIDENTS AND THEIR FAMILIES

FOR THE CELEBRATION OF THE 60TH ANNIVERSARY OF LIBERATION

IN WEIFANG CHINA

 

Ladies and Gentlemen, and dear friends,

 

The year of 2005 is the 60th anniversary of the end of the War II, and the 60th anniversary of the liberation of the former Weihsien Concentration Camp residents and their families. Weifang People's Government is planning to hold commemorative activities in August at the original site of the former Weihsien Concentration Camp in Weifang, China.

 

Foreign & Overseas Chinese Affairs Office of Weifang People's Government is contacting the former Weihsien Concentration Camp residents and their families for more information and their camp life in Weihsien 60 years ago, to full-fill that part of history and to make the commemorative activities in rich and success.

 

It is highly appreciated if you can contact us for further information to attend the event, and can help to locate/inform us as many Weihsieners and their families with their contact information, for us to extend the invitations to them.

 

Our best regards and we are looking forward to your kindiest reply.

 

Sui Shude

 

Foreign & Overseas Chinese Affairs Office of Weifang People's Government

 

For further information, please contact:

E-mails:

Suishude@sohu.com

emailshude@yahoo.com.cn 

Tel: 0086-536-8789858

Fax:0086-536-8789850   0086-536-8233692

 

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: A Letter From Weifang China

Date: jeudi 7 avril 2005 19:36

 

Sui Shude

I think you have my data already.  I am interested at this point.  I will need to know more about the expense, etc.  I am Dwight W. Whipple, 4728A Lakeshore Lane SE, Olympia, WA 98513 USA.

Thank you~

~Dwight

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: A Letter From Weifang China

Date: vendredi 8 avril 2005 0:03

 

 

Sui Shude,

 

My wife Jane and I plan to come to Weifang with two of our children, their spouses, and three grand-children - a total of nine of us.  The grand-children will be the sixth generation of my family to have lived, worked, or visited China since 1862.

 

We hope that this will be an opportunity to meet some of the people that we have come to know through this wonderful email group.

 

Thank you again for providing this opportunity for us to come together to commemorate Liberation Day.

 

Donald Menzi

 

 

De: "Natasha Petersen" <np57@cox.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Info, please

Date: dimanche 10 avril 2005 20:56

 

Weihshien Internees!

I have been trying to find out the details of the 60th anniversary celebration.  All I know is that it is in August.  Has anyone more information? 

Natasha Petersen

 

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Info, please

Date: lundi 11 avril 2005 2:27

 

I have made the same inquiries but haven't received any information about dates or costs.

~Dwight W. Whipple

 

 

**

De: "Sui Shude - Weifang China" <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: the info you reqired

Date: lundi 11 avril 2005 10:44

 

Dear Natasha Petersen,

 

I will email you the letter on the 60th anniversary celebration of the Weihsien liberation. For more information, please contact me. I will tell you what I know and what I am doing.

 

Sui Shude

 

Weifang, China

 

De: "alison holmes" <aholmes@prescott.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: the info you reqired

Date: lundi 11 avril 2005 17:29

 

Please can we have the information mailed to us all to help us make the decision about the Weifang celebrations!  Thank you!  Alison Holmes

 

De: "Natasha Petersen" <np57@cox.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Letter from sui shude

Date: lundi 11 avril 2005 21:43

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Sui Shude" <emailshude@yahoo.com.cn>

To: <np57@cox.net>

Sent: Monday, April 11, 2005 5:03 AM

Subject: Letter from sui shude

 

 

> Dear Natasha Petersen,

>

> Glad to see your letter pasted on the topica lists.

> Right now we are planning the celebration of the 60th anniversary of the Weihsien Camp liberation. We are contacting to see how many people can come to attend the event, and we are preparing to visit the states and Canada for information-gethering and to talk and see more former internees. So I cannot tell you a detailed cost or something about the celebration, but very soon.

>

 My special thanks for you to help me registering on the topica lists. I am sure we will meet each other in Weifang during the celebration.

>

> Please tell me your living address and other contact ways, like mail add, telephone and fax, so we can know if we can visit you on our visit there.

>

> Sui Shude

>

> Attached is the letter to internees from Weifang gov.

>

>

> Letter to Former Weihsien Concentration Camp Residents for the Celebration of 60th Anniversary of Liberation

>

>

> Ladies and Gentlemen,

>

> The year of 2005 is the 60th anniversary of the end of the War II, and the 60th anniversary of the liberation of the former Weihsien Concentration Camp residents and their families. Weifang People’s Government is planning to hold commemorative activities in August at the original site of the former Weihsien Concentration Camp in Weifang, China.

>

> Foreign Affairs Office of Weifang People’s Government is contacting the former Weihsien Concentration Camp residents and their families for more information and their camp life in Weihsien 60 years ago, to full-fill that part of history and to make the commemorative activities in rich and success.

>

> It is highly appreciated if you can contact us for further information to attend the event, and help to locate/inform us as many Weihsieners and their families with their contact information, for us to extend our invitations to them for the commemorative activities.

>

> Our best regards and we are looking forward to your kindiest reply.

>

> Sui Shude

>

> Foreign & Overseas Chinese Affairs Office of Weifang People’s Government

> Address:

> Room 1401, 99 East Shengli St., Weifang, Shandong

> Province,

> P. R. China   Post Code: 261061

>

> For further information please contact :

> E-mails:

> emailshude@yahoo.com.cn

> Suishude@sohu.com

> Tel: 0086-536-8789858

> Fax:0086-536-8789850   0086-536-8233692

>

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Letter from sui shude

Date: mardi 12 avril 2005 12:13

 

 

hello,

Thanks, Natasha, for the copy of Mr Shude's letter.

Yesterday, we had a chat with Father Hanquet at Louvain-La-Neuve --- with the latest "Topica-news" (printed) containing Mr Sui Shude's message about the August meeting at Weihsien this year. Father Hanquet, at 90 doesn't travel any more. He said that he would be delighted to meet Mr. Shude for an interview about "the old days" --- 60 years ago. Janette would be present. She still has her Weihsien childhood memories. I don't remember much of those remote days but curiously I have a picture of "August 17, 1945" engraved deep in my neurones. I was four years old!

I was looking at Ray Moore's photograph No.4 recently

http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/RayM/pages/page04.htm   

 

This empty field. (?) Ray said that he was looking Northwards and pointed his position on a map of Weihsien. Mrs. Bazire, I think, was sitting at that same place 60 years ago and was looking in the same direction when she painted this painting No.1 (click on "sameView"- on the extreme right of the screen).

 

On the right was block 22 and on the left was block 15! We lived in Block 22 and I think that the deJongh family lived in the two first rooms of Block 22 as we can see on the painting.

It looks very different now!

By the way, Can someone help me locate "The Bell" ?

 

http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/wilder/images/w21.jpg   

I'm trying to position it on a map!

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Fw: Letter from sui shude

Date: mardi 12 avril 2005 17:40

 

 

Leopold,

 

Though I don't have the exact location of the bell in my grandmother's paintings, I believe it is Kitchen #1's bell and should be somewhere near that site.

 

Donald.

 

 

De: "Sui Shude - Weifang China" <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Fw: Letter from sui shude

Date: mercredi 13 avril 2005 6:46

 

Mary Previte,

 

I have sent several emails to you and I am not sure if you have read them. Want to know if you are interested in attending this year's 60th Anniversary Celebration of Weihsien Camp liberation and, if the book I am reading is written by you.

 

Sui Shude

 

De: "Christine Talbot Sancton" <sancton@nbnet.nb.ca>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: the late Marie Robinson

Date: jeudi 14 avril 2005 20:44

 

Just to let people know that:

MARIE ROBINSON  died 31 March 2005 Hartlepool, England in her 97th year, widow of John Bainbridge Robinson. The latter was a physician with the Kailan Mining Administration in China, then later in Hartlepool  UK. Marie Robinson will be buried later this month.

 

The Robinson family went out to China in 1934 to work for the KMA.

 

Our families, the 4 Robinsons and the 5 Talbots, shared 3 rooms when we were first interned in Weihsien.

 

Christine Talbot Sancton

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: the late Marie Robinson

Date: vendredi 15 avril 2005 18:54

 

Thanks Christine -- such memories of you all!

Love and God bless -- Pamela

 

De: "Bob McKnight" <bob_mcknight@telus.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: PA Bruce

Date: mardi 26 avril 2005 0:08

 

Hello to all. This is my first post after learning of this site.

My grandfather was PA Bruce.  My uncle and aunt were Jimmy Bruce and Jean Bruce.  Jimmy wrote a short boob some years ago about life at Chefoo and the subsequent transfer to Weihsien.  I scanned this into Word format.  If anyone would like a copy I'll be happy to email it.

Jean married Stewart Goodwin who was also at Weihsien I believe.  They now live in Wimbleton and I could certainly pass on their email to you to any who know them.

 

Bob McKnight

Vancouver Canada

email: bob_mcknight@telus.net

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: PA Bruce

Date: mardi 26 avril 2005 2:53

 

Hullo Bob!  And a very warm welcome to the

Weihsien!topica.com site!

 

It's really great to hear from you. Jean (Bruce) Goodwin and Stewart Goodwin were both classmates of mine and I recall them with fond memories!

 

And of course your grandfather, the legendary P.A. Bruce was my headmaster over sixty years ago in

Shandong!

 

David Birch

 

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: PA Bruce

Date: mardi 26 avril 2005 16:50

 

Hello,

Thanks in advance for your story in Word-format. May I have your permission to include it on the Weihsien-picture-gallery-web-site. I'd love to open a new chapter with new stories and new pictures (photographs-paintings-sketches-documents ---) Four years old in 1945 --- I don't remember much of the Weihsien Concentration Camp (where we lived for 873 days and nights) --- and with the help of many of the Topica-Weihsien-folks all over the World I'm trying to understand how it was.

Just click on this link:

http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/index.htm

In Norman Cliff's chapter, you should easily find the stories relating to "Pa Bruce".

All this is a fantastic adventure!   ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Bob McKnight" <bob_mcknight@telus.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: PA Bruce

Date: mardi 26 avril 2005 17:46

 

For everyone’s information, Jean (nee Bruce) and Stewart Goodwin;s email

address is: stewart@pylori.demon.co.uk  

 

Following is a greeting from them:

 

"At 72, I am still too busy doing medico-legal reports  (to have a pension and travel) after working with leprosy patients in India, Hong Kong and Ethiopia (no pension!).

 

Then back to England for 6 years - trained in Clinical Microbiology (Infectious Diseases), and then invited to be a Professor in Western Australia for 14 years, and 7 years in the United  Arab Emirates.

 

Now Jean and I are in Wimbledon.

Hope you and yours are well.

Professor Stewart Goodwin"

Cheers Bob McKnight

 

De: "Sui Shude - Weifang China" <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Invitation Letter

Date: mardi 26 avril 2005 18:32

 

WEIFANG PEOPLE'S GOVERNMENT

April 25, 2005

INVITATION

 

Respected Mr/Mrs                   ,

 

The year of 2005 is the 60th anniversary of the end of the War II, and the 60th anniversary of the liberation of the former Weihsien Concentration Camp. Weifang People's Government is decided to hold commemorative activities on August 16-18, 2005 at the former Weihsien Concentration Camp site in Weifang, Shandong, China. The Weifang People's Government and the people of Weifang welcome former Weihsieners and their families to attend the celebration.

 

Main Celebration Activities:

--Meeting of "60th Anniversary Celebration of Weihsien Camp Liberation"

--Opening of the "Weihsien Concentration Camp Exhibition House"

--Flower-presenting Ceremony to the Monument of Dr. Eric Liddle

--The Visit of the Former Weihsien Concentration Camp

--Commemorative & Celebration Theatrical Performances

--Friendship Party Between Former Weihsieners and Weifang People

--Sightseeing and Tours in Weifang City

 

Weifang People's Government will undertake the cost of each former-Weihsien-internee with one of his/her family members/friends during their stay in Weifang on hotel room, food, local transportation and activities.

 

Your participation is warmly welcome.

 

Mr. Zhang Xinqi

Mayor

 

Weifang People's Government, Shandong Province, China

 

 

 

Please note the later attached detailed time schedule and registration information for attending the celebration.

 

Sui Shude

 

De: "Tracy Strong" <tstrong@weber.ucsd.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Invitation Letter

Date: mardi 26 avril 2005 19:12

 

Honorable Zhang Xinqi --

 

 

 

        I hope very much to be able to attend but will need about another month to determine if it is possible.  I am the son of Robbins and Katherine Strong and was born in Weihsien in 1943.  I visited the camp in 1980 with my wife, Helene Keyssar, since deceased, while we were doing research on my great-aunt (my father’s father’s older sister) Anna Louise Strong, and have very happy memories of that visit.  The book from that research was published both in China and the US.

 

I am very pleased that you are undertaking this celebration:

 

Sincerely yours,

 

Tracy B. Strong

 

Professeur et directeur, Centre d'études

Université de Californie</>

18, quai Claude Bernard

69365 LYON France

EAP Phone: (011-33)(0) 4-72-73-48-29</>

Tel. domicile: 04 78 37 58 73

Mobile: 06 21 56 78 34</>

 

 

De: "Tracy Strong" <tstrong@weber.ucsd.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Invitation Letter

Date: mardi 26 avril 2005 19:32

 

My apologies to others on the list if my response to Sui Shude went to all of you – the click and not look reflex

 

 

Tracy B. Strong

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Does anyone of our Weihsien network  live near Dallas, Texas?

Date: mercredi 27 avril 2005 3:48

 

Hello, Everyone:

 

    Weihsien rescuer Jim Moore,  (Jim is also a Chefoo School graduate) telephoned me yesterday from Dallas, Texas, to say that Mr.  Sui Shude, our summer host in Weihsien,  and the Mayor of Weihsien will very shortly visit Jim and his wife Pat in Dallas.

 

    Jim is a not physically able to go to Weihien this summer.

 

     Jim wondered if others who were in Weihsien live near enough to Dallas to join in this upcoming visit of the Mayor of Weihsien.  If you live in the Dallas area and would be interested, please e-mail me with address and telephone number so I can pass it along to Jim Moore.  My e-mail in MTPREVITE@aol.com

 

    Mary Taylor Previte.

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: PA Bruce

Date: jeudi 28 avril 2005 4:44

 

Dear Bob

Welcome to the site. I was one of the first to arrive and one of the last to go from WeiHsien. I was 17 years of age when liberated. My name was Joyce Cooke (now Bradbury) I cannot say that I knew your family but I would be happy to receive a copy of Jimmy's writings. Thank you. Joyce Bradbury.

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Invitation Letter

Date: samedi 30 avril 2005 4:34

 

Hello,

 

Thank you for your kind invitation !

 

I am interested in attending the Anniversary Celebration

Can you tell me how to travel from Shanghai to Weifang ?   I may have 3 or 4

people attending with me.

Kind regards,

Joyce Bradbury

 

 

De: "Fred & Coral Dreggs" <dreggs1@bigpond.com>

À: "Ex Internees" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Invitation

Date: mardi 3 mai 2005 5:41

 

Ni Hao Mr. Shude,

 

Many thanks for your kind invitation to attend the commemorative activities on August 16-18, 2005 at Weifang.

I very much regret that I shall not be able to attend . Please convey to the Mayor,Mr. Zhang Xinqi, my sincere apologies and best wishes for a successful celebration.

It so happens that my birthday is on August 18 and on that day I may have a small celebration here in Australia with my family and think of Weihsien.

I still have fond memories of my life in China where I was born and where I lived for 20 years.

Kind regards

Zai Jian.

 

Fred Dreggs

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Invitation to Weifang and commemorative activities

Date: samedi 7 mai 2005 19:11

 

Hello, Everybody:

 

    Yesterday,  a delegation from Weifang (including the Mayor and  Mr. Sui Shude) visited me in New Jersey to present me with an official invitation  to attend "commemorative activities" on August 16 -18, in Weifang at the site of the former Weihsien Civilian Assembly Center.  Earlier in the week, this delegation visited Weihsien rescuer Jimmy Moore in Dallas, Texas, and presented the same invitation to him.  At age 85, Jim is not well enough to travel that distance.

 

    I believe this is a follow up of the same invitation we have received on the Weihsien Internet site.

 

    The Mayor described to me in some detail activities the city of Weifang plans to include in the two days of activities in August.

 

    Sui Shude, who is the interpreter of the Weifang delegation,  says the delegation will be traveling in the USA and Canada for 10 days.  They left New Jersey yesterday afternoon to visit Donal Menzi in New York, then planned to go to Canada to see the Chefoo School archives.

 

    Here is the exact wording of the invitation to Weifang:

 

        " WEIFANG PEOPLE'S GOVERNMENT INVITATION:

 

The year of 2005 is the 60th anniversary of the end of the War II, and the 60th anniversary of the liberation of the Weihsien Concentration Camp.  Weifang People's Government will hold commemorative activities on August 16-18, 2005 at the former Weihsien Concentration camp site in Weifang, Shandong, China. 

The Weifang People's Government and the people of Weifang welcome former Weihsieners and their families to attend the celebration.

 

Main Celebration Activities:

    Meeting of "60th Anniversary Celebration of Weihsien Camp Liberation"

    Opening of the "Weihsien Concentration Camp Exhibit House"

    Flower-presenting Ceremony to the Monument of Dr. Eric Liddel

    The Visit of the Former Weihsien Concentration camp

    Commemorative Theatrical Performances

    Friendship Party Between Former Weihsieners and Weifang People

    Sightseeing and Tours of Weifang City

 

    Weifang People's Government will undertake the cost of each former-Weihsien-internee with one of his/her family members/friends during their stay in Weifang on hotel room, food, local transportation and activities.

 

    Your participation is warmly welcome.

    Mr.  Zhang Xinqi, Mayor"

 

A schedule attached to te invitation lists te following:

        August 16 -- arrival and registration

        August 17 -- Whole day Celebration activities

        August 18 -- Tour and sightseeing in Weifang

        August 19 --  End of activities and Leave Weifang

 

    The delegation asks for donations of "pictures, drawings, daily used articles, books, diaries, souvenirs, of the Weihsien camp for the collection of the  readyopened 'Weihsien Concentration Camp Exhibition House' to fulfill that part of history and to make the commemorative activities in rich and success."

 

    The delegation spent a great deal of time scanning and photographing my collection of Weihsien photographs.  Jimmy Moore tells me they did the same when they visited him.  They said they want photos for the "museum" and for a video they are producing.

 

The Mayor reported to me that 5 buildings of the former camp remain -- including the hospital which is in bad repair.  They said they plan to repair the roof.  They said they also  plan to improve the "river" that runs in front of the former camp.

 

The pages of the activities give two e-mail addresses for Sui Shude:  suishude@sohu.com    and emailshude@yahoo.com.cn

 

They ask visitors to contact by e-mail:  weihsientravel@tom.com  for China travel service,  China tour  assistance and suggestions.

 

Mary Previte

 

 

De: "Anne Whiteside" <awhites@att.net>

À: <tapol@skynet.be>

Objet: Weihsien Civilian Assembly Center Shantung 36-119

Date: lundi 9 mai 2005 3:51

 

A couple of years ago, an elderly cousin told me about another cousin, Faye Isabel Whiteside, who was imprisoned in a Civilian Detention Center in China.  I believe her sister, Edith, was also there, but am not clear about Edith's married name (Moseworth?).  They would have been in their 50's or 60's when they were imprisoned.  I found a record for Fay in the National Records Administration, but cannot find her name (or her sister's) on any lists on the http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/index.htm  site.  I am trying to confirm they were actually there and also learn more about their story.

 

Have you heard of either of them?  Can you recommend other places for me to search?

 

Thank you,

Anne

 

Anne Whiteside

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: "Anne Whiteside" <awhites@att.net>; <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien Civilian Assembly Center Shantung 36-119

Date: lundi 9 mai 2005 9:17

 

Dear Anne,

Thanks for your message.

After a research on the word "Whiteside" on the Weihsien-picture-galley-site, I found this:

"

 Fred's account continues: "The next few days are a confused recollection of unpalatable food and toiling over mountains of baggage. Rain falls and transforms the dust into a quagmire. A keen wind from the north springs up and searches our bones. We lift heavy crates, boxes and trunks with a last-ditch energy that accomplishes surprising results. Other trainloads of refugees arrive every two or three days until we number eighteen hundred souls: British, American, Greek, Belgian, Philippino, Indian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Chinese, Scandinavian, Parsee, Iranian and Palestinian. There was also one Panamanian. At first volunteers staffed the kitchens, bakery, repair shops, pumps and bathhouses. Dr. Loucks and Miss Whiteside with helpers started whipping the hospital into shape."

"

and you can reach the entire text by clicking on this link:

http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/NormanCliff/Diary/WhiteWolves/txt_WhiteWolves.htm  

 

I looked in Ron Bridge's listings and found the name: "Whiteright"

I'll be sending a copy of this mail to our "TOPICA" friends. Hope someone can help you ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

 

De: "Greg Leck" <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Edith Molesworth in Weihsien

Date: lundi 9 mai 2005 19:37

 

Edith Molesworth, aged 69, was repatriated to Canada in September 1943 from

Weihsien.

 

 

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Invitation to Weifang and commemorative activities

Date: lundi 9 mai 2005 22:02

 

REPLY on my family thoughts:  They wanted to know if the financial help applied to the grandchildren of internees??  You don't even mention financial help below.  If you don't know the answer to this question, please pass it on to Sui Shude, or let me know.  My sons want to know if the invitation applies to grandchildren, and/or if there is financial aid for them.  I myself am only the child of internees Hugh and Mabel Hubbard, and am too old to travel alone.

Gladys

 

 

 

 De: <gbn@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Photos

Date: mercredi 11 mai 2005 5:04

 

Does anyone have photos of the Weihsien camp? I have written a book about China and need some photos of the camp.

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Photos

Date: mercredi 11 mai 2005 17:25

 

 

 

Have you checked Leopold Pander's web site?

 

http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/index.htm

He has some photos there.

What is your book about, and when will it be out?

 

Donald Menzi

 

De: "Gary Nash" <gbn@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Photos

Date: jeudi 12 mai 2005 0:19

 

Hi Donald, Thanks for the info. My book was published in 2002 and is about to go into its third printing. Details are on my website www.tarasovsaga.com

 

 

Gary Nash

Australia

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Photos

Date: jeudi 12 mai 2005 9:12

 

 

> Dear Gary,

> It will be a pleasure for me to help you. Let me know the picture(s) you are

> interested in and I will give you all the info I can for the copywrite permissions.

> My mother was born in Harbin and after the Weihsien "episode" her hair

> became all white!

> Thanks for telling us about your book --- (I'll be on "amazon" after sending

> this message)

> Best regards,

> Leopold Pander

> Belgium.

>

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Elizabeth "Betty"  Dempster

Date: dimanche 15 mai 2005 19:21

 

Hello, Everyone:

    An obituary in the Fort Worth, Texas, Star-Telegram notes the death of Elizabeth "Betty"  Dempster Anthony, age 80.  She was daughter of Salvation Army missionaries to China.   My prisoner list says Betty stayed in Weihsien's Block 7.  Who has memories of Betty? 

    Let me quote  from the obituary.

 

    "Born August 27, 1924, in Peking to James and Helga Dempster, Betty spent much of her childhood studying in a Britsh boarding school.  She was away at school when she received word of her father's death.

    The family was told that bandits killed her father because they mistakenly believed he had reported them to the police.

    After the Japanese invaded during World War II, the family was forced into a Shantung internment camp in 1942.

    Mrs. Anthony said the prisoners were policed by Chinese guards, so they weren't beaten or tortured, said her son Richard.  But conditions were harsh.

    She remembered once being fed horse meat and later told it came from a horse that had died of illness.  'She said they closed their eyes and ate what they were given,' Rachel Anthony said.  'They needed their nourishment, no matter how it tasted.'

        Betty volunteered to take her mother's shift cleaning the latrines because the smell upset her stomach so badly, she said.

    American soldiers freed the prisoners about 2 1/2 years later, right around Betty's 21st birthday  The family boarded a Navy transport ship for the

United States.

    Betty joined the Salvation Army and met Dick Anthony, a fellow officer, in Kingsburg, California.  They were married in June 1958."

 

    ON THE SUBJECT OF THE AUGUST CELEBRATION IN WEIFANG:

 

    Weihsien rescuer Jim Moore, has dropped me a note that he hopes to attend the reunion in Weifang wih his son Michael,  "if my health holds out,"  Jim writes.  Jim is 85 years old.

 

    Mary Previte

   

 

De: "Greg Leck" <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Elizabeth "Betty"  Dempster

Date: dimanche 15 mai 2005 22:27

 

Talk about a coincidence.

 

Just one hour before I received the email, I was looking at the Dempster family's entries in the Weihsien nominal roll.  I was familiar with the story of her father.

 

Like many obituaries, relying on sources who don't know the full story, there are errors - the date of internment and "Chinese guards."

 

 

Greg

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: RE: Elizabeth "Betty"  Dempster

Date: lundi 16 mai 2005 2:18

 

Greg:

    Mistakes like these in Betty Dempster Anthony's obituary show the importance of documenting or recording our stories from the Weihsien chapter of our lives.

    The final paragraph of Betty's obituary  says,  "Rachel Anthony said she lived with her mother for all 44 years of her life.  She said she has one regret:  'I wish I had gotten her to talk into a tape recorder,' she said.  'To tell us all the amazing stories from her life.  Now that she's gone, we just have to try to remember everything she told us.'  "

 

    Mary Previte

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Elizabeth "Betty"  Dempster

Date: lundi 16 mai 2005 4:07

 

Hi Mary --

Ann Pellegrino, a friend of mine in Forth Worth, sent me a copy of Betty Dempster's obit.  I sent an e-mail to the author, Alex Branch, mentioning that I had been in Weihsien and asking if he would give my name to her family so that one of them could get in touch with me, but was bluntly told he wouldn't accept my e-mail. Then I decided to write the Star Telegraph with the same message -- as they're not allowed to give out the names and addresses of those they interview -- but now that you and the others have learned of her death, maybe one of you know how I could contact a member of her family.

You guessed it -- I thought possibly if I sent them a copy of The Mushroom

Years they would get a more accurate picture of what Weihsien was like and what we went through.

Much love -- Pamela

 

 

De: "Greg Leck" <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Elizabeth "Betty"  Dempster

Date: lundi 16 mai 2005 4:15

 

Pamela,

 

You can always contact the funeral home, and they will pass on any message.

This way the family's privacy is protected, and they can decide whether to return contact or not.

 

Greg

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Elizabeth "Betty"  Dempster

Date: lundi 16 mai 2005 4:31

 

Hi Greg --

The article I read was not a regular obit, but now that you mention it, I notice there is funeral information with the name of her church and the memorial park.  I should be able to find the address of either, or both, quite easily.

Thanks so much for the suggestion.

Best regards -- Pamela

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Elizabeth "Betty"  Dempster

Date: mardi 17 mai 2005 3:43

 

Hello, Pamela,

    Have you asked telephone information for the phone number of either Betty's son, Robert Anthony or her daughter Rachel Anthony?  I'm guessing that the North Fort Worth Baptist Church where Betty attended would know how to contact the family.

 

    Mary Previte

 

De: "Gary Nash" <gbn@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Photos

Date: mardi 17 mai 2005 4:49

 

Dear Leopold,

 

Thanks for your note. On the www.weihsien.menzi.org site, there is an aerialphoto of the camp and also an excellent map of the camp produced by Fr Verhoeven. They are the ones I would be interested in.

 

As you probably discovered, the US Amazon site suggests the book is out of print - only second-hand copies available. That's because my Australian publisher's US distributor has gone bankrupt, and there is no ready supply until a new distributor is appointed. However it is available on the UK

Amazon site because there is a European distributor.

 

What nationality was your mother? Why was she born in Harbin? How did she get to be in the Camp?

 

Good hearing from you.

 

Gary Nash

61-2-9958-3089

Australia

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Sui Shude

Date: mardi 17 mai 2005 10:02

 

I am very grateful for Mary Previte's email about Sui Shude and the Mayor of Weifang's visit relative to the proposed Weifang re-union. The following message I sent speaks for itself. But I have had absolutely no answer to that and other emails I have sent to Weifang. I know that a number of ex internees are awaiting confirmation from Weifang that the re-union is really a goer. Can anybody re-assure me.? Regards. Joyce Bradbury.

----- Original Message -----

From: Bob&Joyce Bradbury

To: Sui Shude office

Sent: Friday, May 13, 2005 9:56 AM

 

 

I telephoned your office yesterday and spoke to a lady named Deak about my intention to come to the re-union of civilian internees who were in a prison camp under the Japanese Army during the Anti-Japanese War, 1941 to 1945. I understand that the Mayor of Weifang People's Government, Shandong Province Mr. Zhang Xinqi has invited all ex internees with one companion to attend the functions on 16th 17th and 18th August 2005 and to be given free accommodation food and some other benefits.  I also understand that Mr. Sui Shude is in charge of arranging the re-union. Could you please confirm to me that this function is to be held and accommodation will be provided.

I intend to bring my three sons and a granddaughter with me to Weifang. My sons will require accommodation for the three days for which they will of course pay. Preferably at the same accommodation where the internees stay. Would you please tell me the name and details of where this accommodation is situated. I realise that the Mayor and Mr. Shude are in Canada but I urgently desire to be told that this function is genuinely going to take place so that I can make travel arrangements from Australia. Thank you. Joyce Bradbury (British civilian internee in WeiHsien, 1942-45 under my maiden name Joyce Dorothy Cooke. born 13-6-1928)

 

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: "Janette & Pierre @ home" <pierre.ley@pandora.be>

Objet: Re: Photos

Date: mardi 17 mai 2005 11:47

 

Dear Gary,

 About your book I recently ordered, I got a confirmation message from amazon.com who told me that booksulove@hotmail.com: was going to send me the book --- so I suppose that everything is OK.

---

 The photos:

 The aerial photo was sent to me by David Beard, beard@xtra.co.nz  . There is a whole chapter with his documents and recent photographs of Weihsien on the picture gallery: http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/index.htm

 This fantastic picture was taken from a B-29 (73rd wing) in 1945.

     Father Verhoeven's map is a copy I made from an almost wiped-out photocopy we had with his paintings --- I found in our dad's papers. We had the OK message from Father Bellemakers when asking previously for "Lilla's Feast". So --- Feel free to use this document. He just asked for a copy of the book to be sent to: "Father Wilh. Bellemakers c.m., Postbus 7055, 5980

AB PANNINGEN, Holland."

 

 May I transfer the two documents by e-mail. They are in a  *.tif format and rather big in size --- (±5Mo each !!). If you prefer, I'll transfer them on a CD and send them by ordinary post.

---

 My mom's family was from Kiev. Her father worked for the trans-Siberian in Harbin where she was born. Her parents died and she fled Harbin to China where she found my dad. ---  Her name was Clavdia Vorotilo (later Russified into Vorotilova). It's a long story !!!!

---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Elizabeth "Betty" Dempster

Date: mardi 17 mai 2005 20:01

 

Hi Mary --

Thanks, but I've already mailed the book and a letter of sympathy to Rachel Anthony. As Greg Leck suggested earlier, I contacted the North Fort Worth Baptist Church and they were most helpful.

Thanks again for your concern and help.

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: RE: Photos

Date: mercredi 18 mai 2005 2:50

 

Gary,

 

    Would you once again list the name and identifying information about your book?

    Thank you.

    Mary Previte

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>; "Anne Whiteside" <awhites@att.net>

Objet: Re: Wished

Date: samedi 21 mai 2005 4:52

 

Anne. I have sent your query to weishien@topica.com and I am sure anybody who can help will communicate with you direct. You can then return a message to weishien@topica.com introducing yourself etc. Good luck. Joyce Bradbury.

  ----- Original Message -----

  From: Anne Whiteside

  To: 'Bob&Joyce Bradbury'

  Sent: Saturday, May 21, 2005 12:21 AM

  Subject: RE: Wished

 

 

  I have tried twice to post messages, but keep getting an error message.  Do you have any tips?  Do I just send email to weishien@topica.com  I have been trying to use the "POST" button on the Topica site.

 

  

  Sorry, I am new to lists.

  

  Anne

 

  From: Bob&Joyce Bradbury [mailto:bobjoyce@tpg.com.au]

  Sent: Thursday, May 19, 2005 11:18 PM

  To: Anne Whiteside

  Subject: Re: Weihsien

  

 

  Anne. Sorry but I do not recall your cousins Why  don’t you ask the same question on weishien@topica.com  Most ex internees read it and I feel sure somebody will be able to give you information about them.   Joyce Bradbury

 

    ----- Original Message -----

    From: Anne Whiteside

    To: bobjoyce@tpg.com.au

    Sent: Tuesday, May 17, 2005 9:11 PM

    Subject: Weihsien

    

    Joyce, did you by any chance know my cousins in Weihsien?

    They were:

    Faye Isabel Whiteside (sometimes spelled Fay) - a nurse missionary from Tennessee.

    Edith Whiteside Molesworth - her sister who was visiting from Canada when the Japanese invaded Peking.

    

    They were both considerably older than you being born about 1888 and 1874, respectively.  I am trying to locate someone who remembers them.

    

    Anne

 

De: "Ron Bridge" <rwbridge@freeuk.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>; "Anne Whiteside" <awhites@att.net>

Objet: Re: Wished

Date: samedi 21 mai 2005 11:41

 

Ladies RE your query.

Neither ladies were ever in Weihsien as far as can be ascertained. There were a number of people moved directly from Peking ( Beijing) to Shanghai in late 1942/early 1943 in anticipation of an exchange. The ages of the ladies would have put them on the early ones to be exchanged.

 The only records are the following:

Faye Isabel Whiteside born 1888 nurse hometown Johnson City Tennessee sailed from Shanghai on the Meia(Tiea) Maru in Sept 1943 to Goa India where she transhipped to ss Gripsholm of the Swedish America Line. Name recorded in the NY Times report of the arrival in NY of the Grispholm and also in a List published by the British Association of Malaya ( Who were co-ordinating the names of all those interned by the Japanese) Pitt St Sydney Australia in 1944 ( Copy in Cambridge Univ libraray) showing names of "exchanged" US and Canadian Citizens.

Edith Whiteside Molseworth born 1875 sailed from Shanghai on the same ship. Then there is a discrepancy the NY Times passenger list gives her  as American having a home town of Cedar Rapids Iowa but the British Association report gives her as Canadian also there is an India Office document in the British library which lists her as a Canadian who was exchanged in 1943.

Hope this helps

Rgds

Ron Bridge

Weihsien 1943-5

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: I_remember

Date: mercredi 25 mai 2005 10:33

 

 

 

 

Hello,

Click on this picture:

 

if it doesn't work, click on this link:

http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/I_Remember/indexFrame.htm  

You should reach a new chapter of the Weihsien picture-gallery:

http://weihsien-paintings.org$  

So, ---

Right-click on the map at the right side of your screen and print the map of Weihsien on a sheet of A4-paper.

I gave a copy of that map to Father Hanquet and asked him: "What do you remember, Father, when you look at this map?"

So ---

Click on the little map in the left frame on your screen and you will find out --- all in postits!

Question:

Look at the map, and tell me: --- "what do you remember?"

How?

On the map, write down the numbers, 1, 2, etc ---

On a separate piece of paper write down what you remember:

1= I remember ----------------

2= I remember ------------------  etc ---------

Send it to me:

Leopold Pander,

Sentier du Berger 15

B-1325-Corroy-le-Grand

Belgium.

 

Thanks in advance?

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: I_remember

Date: mercredi 25 mai 2005 16:52

 

 

Dear Leopold,

 

Another "home run" for you! (I'm not sure what the equivalent soccer terminology would be, but I assume you know enough about American baseball that you don't need a translation.)

 

Jane and I are looking forward to our meeting you and the others in Weifang this August.

 

Donald

 

De: "Sui Shude - Weifang China" <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Report From Sui Shude Weifang

Date: mercredi 25 mai 2005 18:23

 

Reprot from Sui Shude - Weifang

 

Dear Friends,

 

Sorry for not on the internet so long, as it was not so convenient to get myself on net during my hectic working trip in the U.S. and Canada this month. Now I can hold my computer to read and write.

 

The Official Delegation from Weifang People's Government took a special tour to U.S. and Canada, visited and interviewed some of the former Weihsieners there this May.

 

During the quite limited visiting time the delegation visited and interviewed some former Weihsien internees and their families, including Mary Previte--the New Jersey State Legislature, as well as Weihsien rescuer, Chefoo Schools Association of North America, "Flying-tiger" team people and other organizations concerning the world War II and Weihsien Concentration Camp. The delegation would like stay there for 2 months instead of 2 weeks and even like walk over the whole world to visit all former Weihsieners, which seems not possible. Fortunately the internet helps much.

 

We are trying to put all the former internees/people concerned, who have contacted us with the interest of attending the commemorative activities on August 16 -18 held in Weifang at the former Weihsien Civilian Assembly Center, on our registration list.

 

The preparing works for the celebration of the 60th Anniversary of the Weihsien Camp Liberation is going on in Weifang, as the time schedule for all the activities listed on the invitation letter is decided. 

 

Best wishes,

 

Sui Shude

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: I_remember

Date: jeudi 26 mai 2005 0:57

 

Is 1941 the correct date on one of the post-its?  But what a great map to jog our memories!

~Dwight

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: I_remember

Date: jeudi 26 mai 2005 1:46

 

Thank you Leopold!  I echo Donald's remark about the HOME RUN!  What would we do without people like you and Donald?

 

I'm so thankful that a friend is making it possible for me to attend the 60th Anniversary Celebrations in Weifang (Weihsien)!  So I too am eagerly looking forward to meeting you and Donald (and many others) there in August!

 

David

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: I_remember

Date: jeudi 26 mai 2005 7:43

 

Thanks Dwight, --- you had to read "1943". It's OK now.

--- all the best, 

Leopold

PS (--- send --- or mail to me what YOU remember when looking at that map!!)

 

**

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Report From Sui Shude Weifang

Date: vendredi 27 mai 2005 23:29

 

Dear Mr. Shude --

 

Thank you so much for your invitation to attend the 60th Anniversary of our liberation from Weihsien Prison Camp. I was so looking forward to coming, but due to an unexpected family situation, I have had to change my plans and will not be able to attend.

 

I send my best wishes to you and Mayor Zhang Xinqi, and thank you once again for remembering all of us, old prisoners of war, who lived in Weihsien so long ago.

 

Kindest regards --

 

Pamela Masters

(nee Simmons)

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: "Janette & Pierre @ home" <pierre.ley@pandora.be>

Objet: 60th anniversary celebrations

Date: samedi 28 mai 2005 12:34

 

Dear Mr. Shude,

Dear Mr. Zhang Xinqi,

 

Thank you, and please thank the Chinese government on our behalf, for your kind and most interesting invitation. We would have loved to take part in the Weihsien 60th anniversary celebrations!

After quite a few discussions, we have decided to stay in Belgium, as we are expecting a happy event in our family at about that date or a little later. Twins! ---

Be sure that on the 17th of August, our thoughts and hearts will be with you all, --- in Weihsien!

Best regards,

 

Janette Ley-Pander.

Nicky and Leopold Pander.

 

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: the bell

Date: dimanche 29 mai 2005 8:54

 

Hello,

There was one BIG bell in the tower of block 23!

Did each kitchen have a bell?

Best regards,

Leopold

 

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Fw: the bell/Also regrets re Leopold's inability to come in August

Date: dimanche 29 mai 2005 23:51

 

There definitely was a large bell in the tower about Block 23. And it was rung every day at 12 o'clock noon so that people in the camp could set their watches - No quartz crystal accuracy in those days of old!

 

I think it was the responsibility of John Barling, a Chefoo grad, to ring the noon-hour bell each day. Barling was a boy who was convalescing from tuberculosis and had to avoid any heavier type of work. But he was conscientious and highly dependable and never missed in his bell ringing duties.

 

There were no bells in the various kitchens Donald, as I recall.  Your grandparents, I think, must have simply regarded the Weihsien Camp Bell, as I think we all did, as

OUR bell!

 

Once again I must echo Donald as I too express my regrets that Nicky and Leopold are not able to come to the Weihsien 60th Anniversary of Liberation this August!  I had SO looked forward to meeting you folks!

 

Congratulations as you look forward to the birth of your twins this summer!  May God bless you greatly!

 

David

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Who is attending the reunion in Weihsien (Weifang)?

Date: jeudi 2 juin 2005 5:28

 

Hello, Everybody:

    If you plan to attend our 60th anniversary reunion at Weihsien (Weifang), please drop a confirmation note on this Topica site as well as names of those who will be attending with you.

 

    Here's information we would like to collect for nametags and mealtime groupings:

 

    1. Name you used in Weihsien

    2. Name you use today

    3. What city in China did you come from to Weihsien?

    4. In what Block or building were you housed in Weihsien?

 

    Here're my data:

    1. Mary Taylor

    2. Mary Previte

    3. Chefoo

    4. Hospital building

 

Would you help us spread the word about this reunion?  If you know of Weihsien internees who have not joined our Weihsien Topica group, please notify them of the August reunion.

 

Mary Taylor Previte

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Who is attending the reunion in Weihsien (Weifang)?

Date: jeudi 2 juin 2005 7:00

 

I plan to attend our 60th anniversary reunion/celebration at Weihsien (Weifang) in August.

 

My friend, Cam Copeland, will be attending with me.Cam was not an internee but is keenly interested in the story of Weihsien and is a close personal friend of mine.

 

The information Mary requests is as follows for me:

 

1.  David Birch

2.  David Birch

3.  Yantai (Chefoo/Temple Hill)

4.  Block 61 (hospital bldg - attic)

    (Earlier Block 23, the bell-tower bldg)

 

De: "Sui Shude - Weifang China" <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Who is attending the reunion in Weihsien (Weifang)?

Date: jeudi 2 juin 2005 7:04

 

Dear Mary Taylor Previte,

 

I sent two emails to you on your MTPrevite@aol.com email add during the last few days but all returned. Now I will try another email add on your name card.

 

Sui Shude

 

De: "Sui Shude - Weifang China" <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Guide to Register

Date: jeudi 2 juin 2005 19:11

 

From Sui Shude - Weifang

 

Dear Friends

Focusing on the Celebration of Weihsien Camp Liberation

 

Welcome you, your family/relatives/friends to the 60th Anniversary Celebration Activities of the Weihsien Concentration Camp Liberation held in Weifang, Shandong, China on August 16-18, 2005!

 

Following are the guide for registration to attend the event as well as some forms for you to enter. Please go over the following first.

 

GUIDE to Register:

 

A. Please contact us to show your interest to the celebration and describe the brief background information (Weihsien-internee/EX-internee/Relatives/Friends/Others). And inform us your direct contact information such as your Full name, E-mail, Tel & Fax, for us to send you by email/fax the Invitation Letter as well as the Registration Forms.

 

B. Please read our Invitation Letter, enter the 3 registration forms for the celebration activities and email back to us, and also send us a printed copy with your signatures by fax, before June 30, 2005 to confirm your attending. Then bring printed and signed forms to us in August.

 

C. The city government of Weifang will arrange buses to pick up participants in Qingdao Liuting Airport or Weifang Airport to the hotel in Weifang on Aug 16th, and will arrange a 4-star or the same class hotel down town for all guests attending celebration to stay in.     Accoding to the financial aid policy in each Invitation Letter of  Weifang People's Government, we will undertake the cost of each former-Weihsien-internee or his/her representative with one of his/her family members/relatives/friends during their stay in Weifang on hotel room, food, ground transportation, activities and sightseeing during the celebration time in Weifang city. Other accompanies to the celebration, the cost for hotel room/bed, meals, activities, sightseeing and local transportation during the celebration in Weifang(Aug 16--18)will be:

US$60 / each day/night per person(in double or twin room)

US$80 / each day/night per person(in single room)

 

We will send by email this note, Invitation Letter, as well as the registration forms to all the people on our invitation list as soon as possible:

INVITATION LETTER for the 60th Anniversary Celebration Activities from Weifang People's Government

REGISTRATION FORMS to the celebration activities

 

Weifang People's Government and the people of Weifang warmly welcome you to this 60th Anniversary Celebration Activities and enjoy a happy re-union!

 

Please check on your email and contact for further information if you failed to get the invitation or registration forms.

 

 

Mr. Sui Shude

 

Foreign & Overseas Chinese Affairs Office of Weifang People's Government Add: 99 East Shengli Street, Weifang, Shandong, P.R. China   Post Code: 261041

E-mails:

suishude@sohu.com

emailshude@yahoo.com.cn

Tel: ++86-536-8292675  ++86-536-8233692   Cell: ++86-1390-536-9362

Fax: ++86-536-8292675  ++86-536-8789850

 

De: "George Kaposhilin" <gkapo@sbcglobal.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Weihsien 60th Anniversary Commemoration

Date: jeudi 2 juin 2005 21:39

 

I plan on attending the re-union in Weifang in August 2005. I have found a tour group whose Itinerary includes the visit to the Weifang event,

plus an interesting extra to Kunming and Beijing. The cost is comparable

to a solo trip from San Francisco to Qingdao and a two day stay in a

Qingdao hotel, before and after the Weifang visit. As you know the

Weifang part of the stay is paid by the people of Weifang .

The group's itinerary is attached. They welcome additional Weihsieners but you must make reservations ASAP.

If you are interested contact Mr.. David Cheng at 626-279-2981 or

Americauic@aol.com

In any event, hope to see as many of you as possible in Weifang.

 

George Kaposhilin

 

In Weihsien aka "Porky" Watts

 

De: "Albert Dezutter" <albertdezutter@worldnet.att.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien 60th Anniversary Commemoration

Date: jeudi 2 juin 2005 22:47

 

MessageGeorge:

 

I would be interested in seeing the itinerary, but I didn't see an attachment to your message. Could you resend?

 

Albert ("Albie") de Zutter

 

De: "George Kaposhilin" <gkapo@sbcglobal.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: FW: Weihsien 60th Anniversary Commemoration

Date: jeudi 2 juin 2005 22:56

 

Sorry, I forgot to include the itinerary for the Flying Tiger group.

Here it is.

The Flying Tigers were a group of American volunteers and adventurers who flew critical supplies into Japanese occupied China during WWII. Because all coastal areas of China were occupied by the Japanese they flew the supplies from India over the Himalayan Mountains and into Kunming, which was then the seat of the Chinese government. The trips were treacherous, had to be done at night and many fights were lost. To this day, the Chinese regard the Flying Tigers as the saviors of China in WWII. This part of the trip should be quite interesting.

 

George

 

 

 

 

 

US Flying Tiger Delegation visit China

                         The 60th Anniversary of the World War II

   The 60th Anniversary of the Liberation of the Former Weihsien Concentration Camp

                 (Shanghai /Qingtao /Weifang /Kunming /Beijing )

  11 Days {From August 14, Sunday – August 24, Wednesday.2005}

 

  Attn : Ms. Wang, Hong

Day 01) AUG 14, SUN, 2005     LAX/NRT  NH  005 (1255P/420P) +1

                     Depart West Coast today abroad a spacious jet for your China trip and

                   cross the international datelines. (By All Nippon Airlines– NH )

 

Day 02) AUG 15, Monday          NRT/PVG  NH 921  (610P / 815PP)                      

                   You will arrive in Shanghai at 6:15 pm, the local guide in Shanghai will

                   warm welcome to your arriving. After dinner then transfer to your hotel

for rest.

Day 03) AUG 16, Tuesday          Shanghai - Qingtao  MU 5533 (1220P/130P)

                                                       Qingtao city - Weifang city by coach 

You will arrive in Qingtao at 1:30 p.m. Then will transfer to Weifang City

 by coach. Welcome Dinner Party by Weiafng City Municipal

 Government, Shandong  Province. 

 

Day 04) AUG 17, Wednesday      The Celebration of the 60th Anniversary of

                                                        the Liberation of the formal Weihsien

                                                        Concentration Camp  

                        The schedule for the former Weihsien Concentration Camp Residents and

                   Their Families for the Celebration of the 60th Anniversary of Liberation in

                   Weifang, Shandong Province.       

                  

Day 05) AUG 18, Thursday          Weifang City visit

The schedule for the former Weihsien Concentration Camp Residents and

                   Their Families for the Celebration of the 60th Anniversary of Liberation in

                   Weifang, Shandong Province.

 

6.00 p.m. the reception dinner hosted by Shandong Party Committee,                  & Shandong Province Government, Foreign & Overseas Chinese Affair Office of Weifang People’s Government. Stay in Weifang Hotel

 

 Day 06) AUG 19, Friday           Weifang CityQingtao City by coach  

This morning, will going to Qingao City. In the afternoon,

Landungsbrucke in Qingdao, Mt. Laoshan. Stay in Qingtao Grand Regency hotel five star hotel.

 

 

 

 

Day 07) AUG 20, SAT      Qingtao City by –Kunming   CA 4745 (755A/1225P)

This morning, will going by China Airlines from Qingtao City to Kunming.

 

More than 50 years ago, Kunming was one of the hubs of World War II. Hundreds of thousands of Americans fight with Chinese the Japanese invaders. Together, they pushed the " Burma Road " through the jungles from Kunming to Mandalay. Among American were the " Flying Tigers ", the American Pilots, Who flew lumbering transports over " the Hump " of the Himalayas into the airfield west of the city.

 

Even Today " Flying Tigers " (fei hu dui in Chinese Pinying) is still a household name. Anna Chan, the wife of general Chennault, the creator and head of Flying Tigers, is still active in building the sound friendship between Americans and Chinese. Recently, the publishing of Anna Chan's Chennault and me is an influential event in China.

 

Day 08) AUG 21, SUN      Kunming  -US Flying Tiger in Kunming

 

In October of 1991, 46 survivors of Flying Tigers Association had a nostalgic visit to Kunming 50 years after fighting the Japanese in China during the second world war. The streets of Kunming were decorated to welcome these war heroes, which made  a lot of people recall  that on Aug.1,1941 when general Chennault left China people filled the streets of Chongqing to see him off and it is said the Chennault's driver turned off the ignition and let the throng push the car to the airport.

A lot of Chinese books about Flying Tigers have been published. In Kunming, there are several societies dedicated to the research of Flying Tigers.

US Fly Tigers will be remembered forever for their valuable help to China, and their valiant and heroic deeds.

Day 09) AUG 22, MON      Kunming  -Beijing  CA 4171 (845A/1135A)

This morning, you will fly to Beijing by China Airlines, Beijing local guide will welcome

you – US Fly Tiger at Beijing airport. After lunch, you will visit Tiananmen Square, Forbidden City – this massive complex was the center if the Ming & Qing dynasties. With almost 10,00 rooms, this remarkable, well –preserved imperial palace, is the largest

palace in the world.

 

Day 10) AUG 23, TUE        BeijingGreat Wall & Summer Palace

Today we will visit the Great Wall of China, the pride of China, and one of the Seven

wonders of the World, the great wall is one of the most amazing manmade structures.

After lunch, we will visit Summer palace. Tonight, enjoy the world Peking Duck. Then

a Chinese acrobatics show.

 

 

 

 

Day 11) AUG 24, WED      BeijingTokyo         NH 956  (815A/1235P)

                                             Tokyo – Los Angels   NH 006  (500P/1110A)

After breakfast at hotel, we will fly by international airlines from Beijing to Los Angles

your home- Los Angeles.   (Transfer at Tokyo )                                                    

*        *        *        *        *        *        *        *        *        *        *        *        *

Attn : Ms. Wang, Hong   (Remarks:    The last application date is May 31, Tuesday, 2005 )

 

     Quotation

 

US$1,995 /Per Person + Airport Tax : $100.00 /Per Person

         (Single Room Supplement of $360.00 /Per Person )                                           

                    

This price including of

  • Transpacific round trip for international airlines by economic class.

(This price is only for departure from Los Angeles )

(Departure from Los Angles to Shanghai //Beijing to Los Angeles)

 

  • Including China Government Officials arrangements. 
  • This price including China demotic airlines and airport tax. 
  • Hotel rooms (1/2 twin share). three meals daily, admission fees
  • English Speaking guide & Sightseeing and transportation  

 

This price excluding of

  • China Visa Fee : $60.00 /Per person
  • US Insurance fee
  • Tour guide and Tour driver tips.
  • US demotic air tickets 

 

If you have any question, would you please fell free to contact us at  626-279-2981,

Our fax no is 626-279-5779, we are looking forward to hear from you, thanks.

 

Best Regards,

 

David Cheng, Executive Director

America (UIC) Company

11100 Valley Blvd., Suite 340,

El Monte, CA 91731

Tel: 626-279-2981 & 626-279-5759

Fax: 626-279-5779

E-mail: Americauic@aol.com

 

( David Cheng’s Mobile:  626- 318-5256 )

 

 

De: "George Kaposhilin" <gkapo@sbcglobal.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Weihsien 60th Anniversary Commemoration

Date: vendredi 3 juin 2005 1:21

 

Albie, Sorry, must be a sign of old age. Forgetting what you thought two seconds after you thought it! I have resent it.

 

George

 

De: "George Kaposhilin" <gkapo@sbcglobal.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Info for Weifang trip

Date: vendredi 3 juin 2005 1:48

 

I will be going. Here is my info:

 

Weishien name: George Watts, aka "Porky"

Present name: George Kaposhilin

Arrived in camp from: Tsingtao

Lived in Block 18 with my stepmother Pauline

Activities in Camp: Student, boy scout, soccer player, pumper on Kitchen no 1 pump.

After camp returned to Tsingtao.

Emigrated to U.S. in 1948.

Hopefully my son Nicholas will join me from Singapore.

 

George

 

 

De: "Gary Nash" <gbn@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: RE: Photos

Date: vendredi 3 juin 2005 6:45

 

The book is called "The Tarasov Saga: From Russia through China to Australia". The website for it is www.tarasovsaga.com  

 

Gary Nash

(Igor Ivashkoff)

61-2-9958-3089

 

De: "Edmund Cooke" <shedco@optusnet.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Who is attending the reunion in Weihsien (Weifang)

Date: vendredi 3 juin 2005 11:46

 

  Hullo Everybody,

 

  I intend to be at the reunion, together with my wife, Shirley and the following is my data         -

 

  1.  Eddie Cooke (brother to Joyce Bradbury (nee Cooke)

  2.  Ed. Cooke

  3.  Tsingtao (Qingdao)

  4.   Block 2

 

  Am looking forward to catching up to the past sixty years!

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Who is attending the reunion in Weihsien (Weifang)

Date: samedi 4 juin 2005 1:09

 

Thank you, Eddie, for your response.

 

May I also have your mailing address?  We  hope to  compile a directory of attendees to distribute at our reunion.

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: RE: Who is attending the reunion in Weihsien (Weifang)?

Date: samedi 4 juin 2005 2:17

 

Hello, Mr. Shu:

 

    I have received one e-mail from you, but have not yet received from you a list of attendees at our Weihsien reunion or the official invitation and list of registration forms that attendees must fill out.

 

    I am now getting daily requests for information about any available tour groups going to Weifang for this reunion.  Is there any other tour group?  I know of the tour for the  Flying Tigers, sponsored by America UIC Company.

 

    Mary T. Previte

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: "Carol Fairchild" <icevend@ntlworld.com>; <weihsien@topica.com>; "Sui Shude <" <suishude@sohu.com>

Objet: Request for Invitations and Registration Forms.

Date: dimanche 5 juin 2005 6:31

 

Dear Mr. Shude.

 

Would you please send an Official Invitation and Registration forms to the following Ex Internees:

 

 1. Joyce Dorothy Bradbury, nee Cooke.( In the very first group to arrive in WeisHien (Weifang) Civilian Assembly Centre and one of the last to leave two months after liberation on 17th August, 1945.)  With the Main Accompany granddaughter Danielle Bradbury aged 13 years and sons George Bradbury, Tom Bradbury and Bill Bradbury. Please send invitation and registration form to email bobjoyce@tpg.com.au . Sydney Australia telephone number 2-98783694.

 

2. Stanley Frederick Fairchild from Tsintsien (Now Tianjin) Interned at Weishien (Now Weifang) until end of War. With The    

   Main  Accompany, his wife Jane Fairchild. Please email to icevend@ntlworld.com

 

For the purpose of nametags and mealtime groupings here is the required information as requested by Mary Previte.

 

1. Joyce Cooke

    Now Mrs Joyce Bradbury.

    Tsingtao (Qingdao)

    No. 2 Compound. Kitchen No. 1.

 

2. Stanley Fairchild.

    Tientsin.

    Kitchen No.1

 

We are eagerly looking forward to attending this celebration.  Joyce Bradbury.

 

De: "Dawei Beard" <phoenix7788@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

Objet: Attendance at Weihsien (Weifang) reunion

Date: dimanche 5 juin 2005 20:16

 

Hi everybody,

 

My wife Margaret and I plan to attend the August 16-18 celebrations:

 

1. David Beard

2.     "      "

3. Chefoo/Yantai

4. Block 23; Hospital 21

 

Looking forward to catching up on the past 60 years!

 

David Beard

 

De: "Gay Talbot Stratford" <stillbrk@eagle.ca>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Guide to Register

Date: lundi 6 juin 2005 1:12

 

Unfortunately I am unable to attend, but I thank you and the people of

Weifang for the kind invitation

Mt parents worked for the Kailan mining administration in Tianjin, Linsi and Chinwangtao before being sent to Weihsien. My father  was on the waterpumping team, and worked in the bakery in camp. We lived in Block 6 and block 1.

My best wishes for the reunion.

Sincerely,

Gay Talbot Stratford

Graham and Gay Stratford

285 Cherry Hill Road, P.O. Box 119

Grafton, Ontario

Canada   K0K 2G0

 

 

De: "Mary Broughton" <wilmar@clear.net.nz>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Who is attending the reunion in Weihsien (Weifang)?

Date: lundi 6 juin 2005 3:26

 

Dear Mary,

 

Many thanks for all you are doing concerning Weihsien and have done.

 

I am planning to attend the celebration with my son James Broughton and his fiancée Carolyn Christenson

 

I am

1. Mary Hoyte

2. Mary Broughton

3. Chefoo

4. Block 23 then the Hospital.

 

I replied early on to Mr Shude mentioning a friend Lisa who was coming with me. She is no longer coming.

So looking forward to it all,

Mary

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Request for Invitations and Registration Forms.

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 5:34

 

Hello, Joyce,

 

    I've not yet received the necessary official invitations and registration forms from Sui Shude.  If he e-mails them to you, would you forward them by e-mail to me?  Horrors!  I think we've overwhelmed that office!

 

    Nor have I had a response from Mr. Sui to my request for names of those planning to attend the Weihsien reunion.  Quite a few of the Chefoo contingent have e-mailed me of their plans.  I do hope we can get names to put together a directory of participants to distribute at the reunion.

 

    Would you allow me to broadcast on the Topica network your suggestions for the Weihsien reunion?  I think it might inspire others to offer helpful ideas. 

 

    David Beard from New Zealand is working with Mr. Sui on a map of the old concentration camp site to superimpose on a map of the modern day site.  What a great idea to help directionally-challenged people like me who need landmarks!

 

Mary Previte

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Request for Invitations and Registration Forms.

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 6:08

 

Dear Mary. By all means use anything that will help. I too am having trouble with Sui Shude, even though my brother asked for the invitation last Friday and got it the next day, together with the registration forms. I am sending you a copy of his forms. I think it is important to get an individual invitation form because it is addressed personally and would be a good keepsake.

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Request for Invitations and Registration Forms.

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 6:30

 

 

 

Mary,

 

Mr. Sui has sent me an email stating that he has tried repeatedly to email you but that his emails have been returned to him undelivered.  He asked me to forward the material to you, which I did.  If you have not received it, then it is possible that your email system is blocking his (and my) messages.  If you DID receive my forwarded email, sent directly to you at MTPrevite@aol.com, will you please acknowledge receiving it.  If you did NOT receive it then someone more knowledgeable than I will need to explore the technical reasons for the breakdown in communications.

 

Donald

 

De: "Raymond Moore" <raym82@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: I can't go

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 6:31

 

Hello to all my Weihsien friends,

 

It is with a good deal of envy that I have been reading about the plans for attending the 60th anniversary celebrations in Weifang.   I was fortunate in being able to visit there in 2000, but without the fanfare and official dinners etc that you people will enjoy. Have a look on my page on Leopold Panders website for pictures of this trip.

 

The reason I won't be there is that we are saving for another important trip to China.  Our youngest daughter, Tracey is married to Wilfred and they have a problem having babies due to a chromosomal disorder.  IVF treatment has not worked and is expensive and now they are going through the process of adoption.   They will be adopting a Chinese baby (maybe two) and when the time comes to meet their adoptee, they have asked that we go to China with them.  This of course has become a priority in our lives.  We have a "China trip" biscuit tin which is gradually collecting spare cash for this trip.

 

It is rather exciting for me, because it brings our familly history full circle.  My great grandfather and greatgrandmother, George and Jessie Andrew, went out to China in 1881 and my grandmother Esther was born in China.  She married an ex policeman from Shanghai who had been converted as a result of the witness of CIM missionaries who used to watch him play rugby. She returned to China as a missionary in 1906.

 

My father was born iin China and went back as a missionary in 1931, and I was born in China and lived there until 1950.  That makes three generations of our family actually born in China and now here we have the fourth generation of our family to be born there.

 

For a person who feels more Chinese than Australian, this is exciting and brings our history full circle.

So, much as I would love to be there with you all in August - I have other pressing matters to deal with!

 

Best wishes to you all

 

Ray Moore

 

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Who is attending the reunion in Weihsien (Weifang)

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 16:22

 

>Reply from Gladys Hubbard Swift, daughter of Hugh and Mabel Hubbard of Weihsien.  I would have been at Weihsien but my parents sent me out of China back to the US in January, 1941.  I was a Freshman in college then.

  My granddaughter, Suchi Swift, who spent a year at Hangzhou while in

college, will represent my Hubbard family.

 

 

 

>1.   Hugh  and Mabel Hubbard were in Weihsien Internment Camp

>2.  Suchi Swift is the great granddaughter of Hugh and Mabel Hubbard (already elderly      when      at Weihsien)

>3.  They came from Baoding, Hebei, through Beijing, to Weihsien

>4.  We don't know where they were located in camp.  Does someone else know?

>

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: I can't go

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 16:39

 

Hello, Raymond,

 

    What a disappointment that you won't be joining our Weihsien reunion! 

But I know you'll be with us in spirit.

 

    Your own China trip provides a worthy substitute.  A while ago, the daughter of my oldest brother, James Hudson Taylor, adopted a beautiful Chinese baby girl from an orphanage in Zhenjiang.  Zhenjiang is the city where my great grandfather, J. Hudson Taylor,  died just 100 years ago last week.  Anna is now a bright, beautiful, lively part of the Taylor family.

 

    Mary Taylor Previte

 

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: I_remember,

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 16:53

 

Hello,

--- a new page in the "I remember" chapter ---

go to:

http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/I_Remember/indexFrame.htm  

and click on the maps!

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: To Sui Shude

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 17:03

 

Would you please send Official Invitation and Registration forms to the following :

 

Suchi Swift and Geoffrey Nazzaro

195 Wyckof Ave. 3L

Brooklyn, New York 11237

 

Suchi is the great grand-daughter of Hugh and Mabel Hubbard who were interned at Weihsien.  Geoffrey is her friend.  They plan to attend.

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: I can't go

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 17:09

 

 

Dear Ray,

 

Your story is touching and I'm sorry we won't have a chance to meet in August.  I, too, just had a circle completed last weekend when we attended the marriage of my son, Mark, to a lovely young woman whom he met in China.  My great-grandfather went off to China in 1862, my grandmother and mother and two sisters were all born there, and our family has always felt about as Chinese as American.  Now, this marriage creates a physical bond to go with the emotional bond that the family still carries on.  I would imagine that the descendants of many of these old-time China families feel the same way.

 

Anyway, congratulations.  We will have to include a moment in the ceremony when we think of all of you who would be there with us if you could.

 

Best regards.

 

Donald

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Email Problems

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 17:50

 

 

TO:  All Weihsieners,

 

Apparently either Topica or the "aol" email server has been interfering with communications between Sui Shude and some topica participants.

 

If you have been expecting to receive forms or other communications from Sui Shude and have not received them, please respond to this email. I have offered to try to figure out the source of the problem and deal with it, though I am not yet sure how to do it, since I don't know the scope of the problem.  Mary gave me an alternate email address, to which I forwarded Shude's message to her.  I hope this worked for her, at least.

 

Donald

 

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: The room where Hugh and Mary Hubbard were interned

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 18:04

 

>To Mary Previte - If you hear from David Beard about the map of the old camp site, I would like very much to find out where my parents, Hugh and Mabel Hubbard, were interned '42 to 45.  Since my granddaughter Suchi Swift has decided to go to the celebration in August I would like to tell them where the Hubbards were located.

>Thanks.

 Gladys Hubbard Swift

>

>   "  David Beard from New Zealand is working with Mr. Sui on a map of the old concentration camp site to superimpose on a map of the modern day site.  What a great idea to help directionally-challenged people like me who need landmarks!

>

>Mary Previte "

>

 

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: I can't go

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 18:04

 

To Ray Moore - My granddaughter Phaedra Swift Larner is also adopting a Chinese girl this fall or winter.  Just telling you in case you run into the family.  I understand these adoptions occur in groups.  I was born in China so of course I am delighted that Phaedra and David Larner have decided to do this!!  Gladys Hubbard Swift

 

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: LILLA'S FEAST by Frances Osborne

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 20:44

 

I've just finished reading this wonderful book written  by the great granddaughter of Lilla Casey who was interned at both Temple Hill (Chefoo) and subsequently Weihsien at the very time I was during World War II.

Although I do not personally remember Lilla, after reading Frances O's wonderful bio of her great granny, I honestly wish I had known this marvelous old lady back in those days.

 

What a truly amazing woman!  In spite of what could easily have been insurmountable obstacles of many kinds and descriptions, Lilla kept her sanity and her dignity all her life long! 

 

If you have not yet read Lilla's Feast, you really owe it to yourself to read it right through!  It is a superb treat!!!  I'm sure it is available through AMAZON DOT COM!  Or your local library must be able to obtain copies to loan out!

 

I particulary appreciated the descriptions of places I personally knew long ago:  CHEFOO, QINGDAO, SHANGHAI, for example.  Frances made Chefoo really come alive again for me - I lived there at the CIM Chefoo School from 1938 to 1943.  I was six when my missionary father, George A. Birch, took me to the school in 1938. And I was eleven when the Japanese took us all from Chefoo to Weihsien in September 1943.  When the war ended in August 1945, I was thirteen going on fourteen!

 

What memories!  I well recall making "coal balls" and "briquettes!"  And I clearly recall doing my regular chore as a twelve and thirteen-year-old boy.  My job was to pump water into the large water tank just outside the Ladies' Showers.  Also how well I remember joining the long line-up for slack coal and carrying the heavy coal scuttle back to my dorm during the viciously cold winter months.

 

Many of my memories are not bad ones at all. 

I remember playing a version of basketball outside the hospital (Block 61) with my good friend Torje Torjeson. And I remember learning how to play baseball (softball) in which we boys were coached by our well-loved master, S. Gordon Martin!  The day that I caught a high flyball and heard Goopy shout Attaboy

David is forever etched in my memory!  How proud I was of my simple achievement!  What a wonderful teacher Goopy was!  He also coached us boys in gymnastics.  We had what he called and "Agility Squad" where we performed amazing feats of physical contortions and leaps and human pyramids, and so on!

 

And I learned to play table tennis (ping pong) at Weihsien too!  Many is the game I played in Kitchen One with my special chum Stanley Thompson!  In fact I have "immortalized" the last game of ping pong I recall playing with Stan in a published article entitled simply "A Game of Pingpong!"  Stan and I were actually locked in deadly combat in this pingpong game when the US Army Air Force B24 Liberator bomber flew over the camp and dropped those marvelous young airmen down to us by parachute on that memorable day in August 1945!

Of course, like everyone else on that memorable day, we dropped what we were doing and ran out to welcome out liberators!

 

I do not recall feeling hunger pangs at Weihsien, even though we were woefully undernourished!  The reason I believe is that the human stomach adjusts in its capacity to the amount of food that is available.

 

Well I could go on and on!  The vegetable and flower gardens we children were encouraged to develop.  The kindness of a Japanese guard in helping me to cultivate my personal garden patch, etc., etc.

 

Thank you Frances Osborne for bringing all this back to me in your fascinating and very well-written book, Lilla's Feast!  You have certainly made a marvelous contribution not just for your own family but for us all!

 

David Birch

gdavidbirch@yahoo.com

 

 

De: "Tracy Strong" <tstrong@weber.ucsd.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: The room where Hugh and Mary Hubbard were interned

Date: mercredi 8 juin 2005 21:50

 

Does anyone know where my parents, Robbins and Kitty Strong, were interned?

I visited Weihsien in 1980 and was apologetically told that that building had been torn down, but that this other one "was just like it." Also got an extended banquet (2 bottles of Maotai!)

Best to you all

Tracy

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: The documents arrived!

Date: jeudi 9 juin 2005 14:49

 

Thank you, Mr. Siu Shude,

    The official invitation and registration papers have arrived safely, forwarded from Donald Menzi.   Thank you for all your efforts to create a new and wonderful memory of Weihsien for all of us.

 

    Mary Previte

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>; <douglasrosie@ntlworld.com>; <jknisely@paonline.com>; <roycampbell@earthlink.ca>; <mikecalvert@hotmail.com>

Objet: What activities will help make our Weihsien reunion a success?

Date: jeudi 9 juin 2005 21:34

 

What suggestions do you have for making our Weihsien reunion a success? 

Please add your own thoughts.

 

Here are suggestions from Joyce Cooke Bradbury in Australia. 

 

From my experiences from attending a number of China Hands reunions, I remember difficulties in identifying old friends. Therefore,  I think each ex internees should wear a LARGE (for obvious reasons) identification  badge with the name or maiden  name of the wearer. It would be helpful if the city or town from which the wearer came, such as Tientsien,  Chefoo, Tsingtao,  etc. were shown on the tag.

 

I think a list of all ex internees attendees should be prominently displayed at the reunion. Also a list showing the attendees from each town or area and perhaps room or phone numbers. If possible the list should show table numbers for each person. I remember at one reunion (in Los Angeles) the names were listed but there was no way of contacting them until a large blackboard was set up so that people could chalk alongside names messages to contact giving phone/room numbers,  etc.

 

Perhaps persons from specific towns could be grouped in the one area - tables for instance.

 

On the first day or soon afterwards a MEET AND GREET opportunity should be arranged. Perhaps with drinks available so that people could seek out friends informally and have a chat.

 

To enable appropriate lists to be prepared,   registration forms should be completed as soon as possible. They should show names, maiden names, as well as towns where from,  etc

 

Of course photographs and other mementos of the camp should be brought, as already requested.

 

Maybe it would not be out of place to find some of the Chinese blackmarketeers who were involved with Father Scanlan and others in providing much needed sustenance for inmates - particularly children. (Just a thought)  I remember when Stan Fairchild and myself visited WeiHsien camp in 1986,  he actually met one such and both reminisced.

 

Maybe it would be possible to invite each ex to stand up and very briefly (say two minutes) give an outline of where they finished up after the camp. That may depend of course on numbers attending.

 

A schedule for how to obtain transport from Tsingtao and other places to WeiHsien to and from the reunion would be helpful

 

As you suggest it is probably worthwhile to ask those on WeiHsien Topica to add to my thoughts. I realise that this may entail extra input by the organisers but some suggestions are bound to make the function a great success.

 

Joyce Cooke Bradbury

 

De: "Dawei Beard" <phoenix7788@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

Objet: Contact with former Chinese blackmarketeers

Date: vendredi 10 juin 2005 2:51

 

The suggestions made by Joyce Cooke Bradbury for making our Weihsien reunion a success are all excellent. I think that making contact with any surviving former Chinese blackmarketeers - if any are still alive - or their families, is most important. It would be nice to express our appreciation for the risks they took in the black market operations. And there were also those who smuggled in the secret messages from our two escapees.

To locate any of the above may require some detective work by the Weifang Govt.  I'd be happy to follow up on it if it wasn't for the fact that I'm already in touch with Sui Shude on other matters, one of which is getting a map of the area of Weifang where No 2 Middle School is sited, and want to ensure that these are successfully actioned.  Perhaps Mary Previte, or Joyce herself, could take it up directly with Sui Shude?

 

The Reunion is hotting up to be a great one. Looking forward to seeing you all, providing I can get hold of the elusive registration forms!!

 

David Beard

 

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: LILLA'S FEAST by Frances Osborne

Date: vendredi 10 juin 2005 4:01

 

To David Birch:  - I have also read Lilla's Feast  and was amazed at her description of the food at Weihsien, something I had not heard in such detail.  Do you remember or have access to the information of where people were located at Weihsien Camp ?? 

Specifically, my parents Hugh and Mabel Hubbard? 

And I see Tracy Strong wants to know where his parents, Robin and Kitty Strong, were located.  Presumable that was where Tracy was born!  Any suggestion would be appreciated.

Gladys Hubbard Swift

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: I_remember

Date: vendredi 10 juin 2005 5:20

 

 

 

-----Forwarded Message-----

From: Nicky & Leopold <tapol@skynet.be>

Sent: May 25, 2005 4:32 AM

To: weihsien@topica.com, weihsien@topica.com, weihsien@topica.com

Subject: I_remember

 

 

 

 

Hello,

Click on this picture: 

 

if it doesn't work, click on this link:

http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/I_Remember/indexFrame.htm  

You should reach a new chapter of the Weihsien picture-gallery:

http://weihsien-paintings.org

So, ---

Right-click on the map at the right side of your screen and print the map of Weihsien on a sheet of A4-paper.

I gave a copy of that map to Father Hanquet and asked him: "What do you remember, Father, when you look at this map?"

So ---

Click on the little map in the left frame on your screen and you will find out --- all in postits!

Question:

Look at the map, and tell me: --- "what do you remember?"

How?

On the map, write down the numbers, 1, 2, etc ---

On a separate peice of paper write down what you remember:

1= I remember ----------------

2= I remember ------------------  etc ---------

Send it to me:

Leopold Pander,

Sentier du Berger 15

B-1325-Corroy-le-Grand

Belgium.

 

Thanks in advance?

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: LILLA'S FEAST by Frances Osborne

Date: vendredi 10 juin 2005 5:30

 

 

Gladys:

 

I do recall Mr Hubbard - just slightly.  I was only a very young teenager at Weihsien though.  In fact I was not yet twelve in September 1943 when I arrived with the others from Chefoo at Weihsien.

 

Somehow I seem to remember - please correct me if I am mistaken - that Mr Hubbard was a wellknown authority on birds.  When I was twelve or thirteen, I attended an evening lecture given in Kitchen One on birds of China. I think that Mr Hubbard was the man who gave us this intensely interesting talk.  If he was indeed the man whom I heard that evening, probably in 1944, he told us of his experiences in observing (up close) some fascinating breeds of birdlife!  One that really caught my attention was the story of how he approached a very large bird which was most dangerous to come close to. He said this bird would attack if it felt threatened and that its sharp beak could penetrate right into a human being's lung.  The bird may somehow have been held in a trap. I think Mr Hubbard had to throw a dark blanket or tarpaulin over the bird so that he could rescue it.

 

I'm very sorry Gladys, but I really do not know which residential block Mr and Mrs Hubbard occupied.  I wonder if Ron Bridge might know.  I do know that Ron has probably got the best overall records of the names of internees from those days.  Perhaps he also has some idea of where in the camp they lived.

 

It is admirable that you are doing your best to piece together an accurate record of your parents personal history in Weihsien. Such records are an important part of a family's history.

 

It's great that you have also read LILLA'S FEAST by Frances Osborne.  What a tremendous treat it was to devour this truly important piece of wartime history.

 

Sincerely

 

David Birch

gdavidbirch@yahoo.com

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Photo and Map

Date: vendredi 10 juin 2005 5:33

 

 

 

David,

 

Leopold's email mentions that you are developing a "superposition" of the camp map and the aerial photo.  Is this the same thing that Leopold has posted, or are you doing another.  If so, I would like very much to have a copy to use at the beginning of the Powerpoint presentation Leopold and I are developing.  Perhaps you could email a copy as an attachment.  If it is too large for Topica to transmit, you could send it directly to dmenzi@earthlink.net .

 

Thanks.

 

Donald

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Presenting Weihsien Memories

Date: vendredi 10 juin 2005 5:39

 

Hello all,

 

Leopold and I have agreed to jointly develop a 20 - 30 minute visual (Powerpoint) presentation that will combine paintings done by Weihsien internees with the map of the camp and the memories that Leopold is collecting in the "I remember" project.  I will be combining them all in a visual/verbal "tour" of the camp, which will be projected onto a screen.  Sui Shude will be able to provide a running translation during the presentation itself.    We should also be able to provide each of you with a CD from which you can "play" the presentation on your own computer.  I hope to be able to make the text bilingual (English and Chinese).

 

Our Weifang hosts have agreed to make this presentation part of their formal celebration program. 

 

In order for this presentation to be as successful as possible we need you to contribute your memories, stimulated by the map of the camp, to Leopold's "I Remember" project.  They will have to be brief, similar to those Leopold has already posted on his site:

 

http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/I_Remember/indexFrame.htm

 

So please send your memories to Leopold as soon as possible.  We can only use those that you submit, and we will need some time to assemble them and create the Powerpoint presentation.   I will be forwarding Leopold's 5/25/05 email to you as a reminder of how to do it.

 

Hope to see as many of you as possible in August!

 

Donald

 

De: "Dawei Beard" <phoenix7788@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: <glaswift@cstone.net>

Objet: RE: The room where Hugh and Mary Hubbard were interned

Date: vendredi 10 juin 2005 14:48

 

Hello Gladys

Your parents were quartered in Block 10/9. To get a visual idea of where they were, go to Leopold Pander's excellent website dedicated to Weihsien:

http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien  On entering the Picture Gallery, on the left is a list of 'chapters'. Click on David Beard. On the top left click on the map and enlarge it. Look for Tin Pan Alley. On the right side of Tin Pan Alley, starting from Market Square Park, the blocks start from Block 15 Thistle Dew. Count down to Block 10, which has the initials C.H.E. as the name. Try clicking on the red arrows on the map and you'll see my listed pictures come up on location. (Clever of you, Leopold!)

Next, click on 1945, locate the aerial shot of the camp and click on it and enlarge. Using a copy of the map, you hopefully will figure out the location of Block 10. In a few more weeks I may have some new aerial photos to add to the collection, one of which shows the Tin Pan Alley area from a new perspective. Watch this space!

I'm in touch with Sui Shude of Weifang, who will try and provide a to scale map of the 500m square area of Weifang City which was formerly the site of the Camp. On it hopefully will be marked the location of the five remaining historic houses. Over that we will place a transparent overhead projection print of C.A.C. Weihsien, in the same scale as the map, so that we can get our bearings.

Here's to hoping it works!

Have fun on the Picture Gallery!

Best wishes

David Beard

 

 

De: "leopold pander" <pander.nl@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: The room where Hugh and Mary Hubbard were interned

Date: vendredi 10 juin 2005 18:24

 

Hello David,

Fantastic!

I was preparing a location for Gladys and you were faster!

Ron Bridge's listings are real precious.

Thanks.

---

Let me know when you get the city-map of Weifang? I'm really impatient to see it (as others certainly are). I made a research on the Internet (for a city-map of Weifang) but only found general maps --- nothing more.

I hope Mr. Shude will be able to help.

Donald is boiling with ideas for the 17th --- so are you and so am I.

Hope we will manage ---

Best regards,

Leopold.

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: "Desmond Power" <despower@shawcable.com>

Objet: Re: LILLA'S FEAST by Frances Osborne

Date: samedi 11 juin 2005 4:51

 

To Gladys and David,

 

After reading both your e-mails, may I add my 'tuppence worth.

 

The Hubbards were an outstanding couple who gave much of themselves for the benefit of others in camp.  Sometime ago, I did mention their generosity in allowing their room, Block 10/9, in camp to be used as a classroom for the PAS students, one of whom was myself.

 

Not that you would be able to place it, Gladys, but blocks 10 & 11 were directly across from Kitchen-1, separated by Rocky Road, (recent maps show it as Tin Pan Alley) which was the name of the main thorough fare that connected Block 23 to the ball field.

 

However, with great regret, I missed out on Hugh Hubbard's lecture that night, as I am sure his devotion to Ornithology would have insured it was a talk well worth listening to.

I don't know how I missed out on hearing about that lecture, as my childhood interest on anything with wings that flew, was already keen, even in those days.

 For what it's worth, some of you may even remember the boy (me) who raised a brood of 4 Peregrine falcon chicks, in camp, to full fledged adulthood? Yes, by begging for definite discards of meat to feed them from K1, no less.

 

Kind regards to you both,

Zandy

 

 

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: LILLA'S FEAST by Frances Osborne

Date: samedi 11 juin 2005 5:27

 

Reply to David Birch - You are absolutely correct that Hugh Hubbard was an authority on birds, the co-author with George Wilder of "Birds of Northeastern China" and  also "Tape Recorded Reminiscences of a Lifetime of Service in China 1908-1952"  I just checked the latter and there is almost nothing in it of the Weihsien internment.  Too bad.  He only explains how some missionaries were able to get money by going to the Italians and writing chits to their mission boards, and "I keep the account, and then the Italians completed the deal with the Japanese, and got the money that could be used in the canteen."  Maybe there is more in some of his papers but I haven't seen it yet.  Thank you, David for our help.  Gladys Hubbard Swift

 

De: "Dawei Beard" <phoenix7788@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: LILLA'S FEAST by Frances Osborne

Date: samedi 11 juin 2005 8:31

 

Zandy,

A fascinating recollection! How did you manage with the peregrine falcons as they approached full fledged adulthood? Did you teach them to hunt? How does the story end?  I think we must all have been 'bird mad'! I tried raising a fledgling pigeon when we were in Block 23, but it didn't survive. Bird watching for the Scout badge is one of my happy Weihsien recollections.

There was an excellent site in the area back of the hospital marked 'playground', behind the basketball court, I think, where quite a high mound gave a clear view over the camp wall. I recall there were quite big trees there and I spotted a few golden orioles. Obviously the ';Hugh Hubbard ornithology spell' was cast wide.

Will we be seeing you at Weifang? Doubt the bird life will be as good this time!

Regards,

David Beard

 

De: "Sui Shude - Weifang China" <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Dr. Norman Cliff is Visiting Weifang Now

Date: dimanche 12 juin 2005 17:31

 

Dear Weihsien Friends,

 

Sorry for slow response as we are busy out to everything concerning the celebration and re-union preparing works. The application forms has completed and will be sent tomorrow to each who contacted us for attending the celebration.

 

Dr. Norman Cliff, who was interneed in Weihsien Camp and now lives in London, arrived Weifang this afternoon from Yantai. He will stay in Weifang the whole day tomorrow for visiting the Weihsien Camp and accept the interview of Weifang TV.

 

Dr. Norman Cliff will also meet with leaders of Weifang People's Government to donate the books he wrote and pictures he collected concerning his life and impression of the former Weihsien Concentration Camp.

 

Mr. Li, the vice mayor of Weifang, invited Dr. Norman Cliff to the fromal welcome banquet this evening in Weifang Hotel. Leaders from Weifang Foreign Affairs Office, Weifang TV Station attended the welcome banquet. Sui Shude did the translation.

 

Tomorrow Dr. Norman Cliff will visit the Weifang 2nd Middle School and Weifang People's Hospital, where the former Weihsien Concentration Camp was. He will see most of the former buildings there are being under repairing for the celebration.

 

Dr. Norman Cliff is very healthy and comes to China alone, he will leave Weifang for Ji'nan tomorrow evening by train.

 

This news is posted at 11:24 pm, June 12, 2005 in Weifang, China

 

 

Sui Shude

 

De: "Dawei Beard" <phoenix7788@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>; <pander.nl@net.be>

Cc: <rwbridge@freeuk.com>; <snordmo@sd.fastq.com>

Objet: 61st Anniversary of the Weihsien Escape

Date: lundi 13 juin 2005 13:02

 

Hello everyone,

 

This Thursday, June 16, 2005, will be the 61st anniversary of the epic escape of Tipton & Hummel from Weihsien CAC - the account of which is enshrined for posterity in "Chinese Escapade", by Laurance Tipton, London Macmillan & Co Ltd 1949, ASINB0007J2AB6.

 

I've just re-read Father Hanquet's article 'A Successful Getaway.' Fr Hanquet, who was deeply involved in planning the getaway,refers to "our block No 56.......Tipton lived with us, on the first floor". The article gives fascinating insights. Leopold, could we have the article posted once more on Topica - while it's topical. Thanks.

 

On consulting the 'oracle' - i.e.  Ron Bridge's near worth-it's-weight-in-gold 'Weihsien Camp - Total List of Inmates Including Those Repatriated' (my copy dates back to the year 2000, when I was applying to the UK War Pensions Agency for an ex-gratia payment), sure enough, there is a listing on p.45 for Laurance Edward Tipton, British, of Yee Tsong Tobacco, with the note 'Escaped 16. 06. 44. If you want to locate a near identical list, go to: http://users.skynet.be/bk217033Weihsien   and on reaching Leopold Pander's most excellent Weihsien Picture Gallery, go to Index and double click on 'Ron Bridge - Camp List'. I've just paid my first visit to Ron's chapter and am VERY impressed! You can either get the full list of Weihsien inmates, dated 30.06.44 (compiled, I see, two weeks after Tipton & Hummel's escape, which expains why they don't feature in it). Or, you can go to the map, click on any given Block, and it will give you an extrapolated list of all those who lived in that block. Thank you for such a marvelous facility, Ron. I had started to laboriously list all the residents of Block 56, but now find you've already done all the hard yards ! Fabulous! You will come to the Reunion so that we can thank you in person, won't you?

 

Have you yet compared the 2003 photo of Block 50 with the 1943 oil painting of it? or an April '45 water colour painting of Block 56,'The Priests' Shack', with an August '45 photo of the same, showing residents Fr de Jaeger, Fr Hanquet et al? They are in Leopold's Weihsien Picture Gallery: under INDEX click 'David Beard', then 1945 for Block 56 and 2003 for Block 50.

Finally, click BACK to reach the map at the top left of my chapter and double click on the map.Point your mouse arrow at the large arrows on the map and 'hey presto', you'll have an instantaneous miniature picture of that Block in situ! (Fantastic; great work, Leopold!)

 

Have fun!

 

David Beard

 

De: "Ron Bridge" <rwbridge@freeuk.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: 61st Anniversary of the Weihsien Escape

Date: lundi 13 juin 2005 14:32

 

Dawei,

Thanks for the accolade I am actually working on all establishing the names British inmates of Japanese Camps, but at this age have included everyone in predominantly British Camps and those that were exchanged because some of those exchanged in 1942 were held in places like Bridge House Shanghai and Forfar Road Tientsin and almost all the 1943 exchanges were in a Camps before hand. Currently my data base is approaching 50,000 names ( in the same format as you have all seen for Weihsien) but that includes the HKVDC, HKDDF,HK RN Dockyard Police, the SSVF, FMSVF, Merchant seaman and 11,000 whom I know to be Dutch women and children and 4500 whom I know to be Americans held in the Philippines. At this stage I am not sure how I will publish the findings. I still think that I have another 5% of the British civilian to find mostly in Burma Manchukuo (Manchuria) and Japan

As to the Reunion I am afraid that I cannot make it I have duties in the UK as Chairman of the Association of British Civilians Internees far East Region on the 15th and 21st August also my wife would want to come and she is banned from flying by her specialist until September having had a double hip replacement seven weeks ago. I will be thinking of you all having a great time swapping stories.

Rgds

Ron

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: 61st Anniversary of the Weihsien Escape

Date: lundi 13 juin 2005 18:30

 

WOW!!!

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: 61st Anniversary of the Weihsien Escape

Date: lundi 13 juin 2005 18:46

 

Hello David,

Thanks for your nice words ---

Well, here comes the successful get away,   (again)

---

June 15th, --- we will be celebrating Father Hanquet's 90th birthday !

---

Best regards,

A+  Leopold

Objet: A SUCCESSFUL GETAWAY

 

Date: mercredi 27 novembre 2002 9:10

 

 

 

Father Hanquet writes:

 

 

 

          All those who were in Weihsien prison camp know that Tipton and Hummel had made an evasion during the month of June 1944, but what they don't know, is how it was prepared and how, finally, it succeeded. I will try to give them that complementary information.

 

 

 

For a few young and dynamic prisoners who didn't have family responsibilities, evading camp was a constant dream. I was one of them. It was also a means to lessen the monotony of the camp days.

 

 

 

Well, to do so, there were a few conditions to respect. Firstly, absolute secrecy was a major clause. Father de Jaegher, who was one of those young and dynamic elements, and with whom I shared the same room, had the same desire of evasion. We however never spoke about it.

 

 

 

Every one of us, without the knowing of the others, was trying to put up a contact with a Chinese from the outside. That was the second condition to accomplish: to find a serious arrangement with a Chinese from the exterior who sometimes came into camp. This service would have to be well paid for, and that would be done by Larry Tipton, often seen with Father de Jaegher and who had a few gold bars, a necessity for the transaction.

 

 

 

Tipton and R. de Jaegher were often seen in the mornings, walking to and fro on the sports field pretending to improve their Chinese language while, in fact, they were exercising their muscles for the long walks they would have to make, once outside. That was during the winter period of 1943-44.

 

 

 

Meanwhile, R. de Jaegher kept on trying to establish a contact with the cesspool coolies that came daily to empty the prisoners' latrines. As for myself, I was lucky enough to meet and make friends with a Chinese carter bringing the vegetables into camp. I talked about it to R. de Jaegher, and we decided that I could maybe try something about it. As my Chinese friend seemed trustworthy and quite serious, we promised him a good reward by the means of Larry Tipton's gold bars. That was during the months of March-April, 1944.

 

 

 

One day, my Chinese contact brought me a written message: "our plan is well established, and on the chosen day, we would be met and provided with donkeys or mules on a road boarded by trees, situated beyond the valley at the North-East end of the camp. We were to have a little flag with the mention: "welcome to our foreign friends". We hoped to travel by night so as to reach a safe enough point by the following day.

 

 

 

We had now to select the date. We had observed the moon and decided to choose a night when the moon would rise after midnight, which would ease our moving about. Don't forget that in those days, there was no street lighting. That got us in the whereabouts of the 10th of June.

 

 

 

In the meantime, Father de Jaegher had had difficulties with our immediate ecclesiastic superior in camp, Father Rutherford. He had been informed of our project by another Father, (N.W.), and had pronounced an ecclesiastic sanction in the terms of: "suspensus a divinis" if ever he left the camp. He had to, he said, because it was vital to avoid the eventual reprisals by our Japanese captors towards the Christian prisoners in camp.

 

 

 

Tipton was very disappointed. He absolutely wanted to leave the camp with a missionary. You must know, that in those days, local churches easily welcomed the traveling missionaries.

 

 

 

Father de Jaegher told me of this interdiction, and it was agreed between us that I would take his place. Alas, whilst sitting on my bed, and while, in great secrecy, I was confectioning my back sac, my colleague, Father N.W. saw me doing so and quickly concluded that I was going to take Father de Jaeger's place in the escapade. He told so to Father Rutherford who called for me and pronounced the same banning as he had to R. de Jaegher.

 

 

 

A hasty meeting was held, and we decided that Tipton would ask Hummel to take our place. He immediately accepted which allowed us to keep the schedule previously established for the getaway.

 

 

 

Now, we had to choose the place and the exact time such as to involve the smallest amount of people and however succeed in our task. As for the place of the breakthrough, we quickly found complicity at the end of an alley (in the vicinity of n°10) where we hid a ladder, absolutely necessary to go over the boundary wall high of more or less 2.40 meters. In those days, on the other side of the wall, there was just a fence with 6 to 7 barbed wires of which the uppermost was electrified. We believed that the current was put on that wire only after 10 P.M., which was curfew time, and also the moment when a Japanese guard switched off all the lights in our compound for the night. We weren't sure about that and told the escapees to wear rubber-soled shoes and rather put their feet on the big porcelain isolators while climbing over the fence.

 

 

 

We had also to make sure that there were no Japanese guards around. On the chosen night, our group of 6 or 7 friends were all in place and watching in the different alleys in order to get the ladder in place, against the wall. The time was then, 9.30 P.M. and in less than 5 minutes, Tipton and Hummel were beyond the wall and over the fence.

 

 

 

We were, however, very anxious to avoid any mishaps, and had previously arranged with them for a recuperation procedure if ever they missed the "contact" at the scheduled location.  That is why, between 6 and 7 in the morning, the following day, I had to be waiting for them near the boundary limits not very far away from our bloc n°56 at a place, behind the wall that was invisible from the watch towers. I hid myself just behind the morgue ready with a thick strong rope. If ever I heard the cry of the owl, I had to thrust the rope over the wall to help them back into the compound.

 

 

 

You can easily understand that on that particular night, we didn't sleep very much and that I sighed with relief after 7 o'clock in the morning when I got out of my hiding place just behind the morgue.

 

 

 

Now, we had to give the best possible chances to our two escapees in order to let them get away as far as possible from the camp. As we know, the Japs made a roll call every morning at 8 o'clock. At that precise moment we all had to stand in a row in front of our respective blocks and in the order of our badge-numbers. Tipton lived with us, on the first floor. Actually, it was Mc. Laren who was responsible for us towards the Japanese Commandant. I secretly informed Mc Laren of our projects and arranged with him that as warden of our bloc, I would give the alert as late as possible. At the roll call, I would simply say that Tipton was already working in the kitchen. It is only around 10 o'clock that morning, that I mentioned Tipton's absence to Mc Laren. He then asked me, in the presence of the camp's Commandant, to go and make sure that he was not in the toilets or anywhere else. The same thing happened for the missing of Hummel. While I was going all over camp to search for Tipton, the rumour spread fast, and at about 11, I came back empty-handed, and informed the irritated Commandant. He was very sure of himself and absolutely certain to recapture the escapees. As a precautionary measure, he put all the escapees' roommates under room arrest. Even, days after that, and from time to time, they had us rounded up in the middle of the night and guarded by armed Japs.

 

 

 

As for the escapees, they rapidly managed to reach the Chinese guerrilla forces and shared their lives with them for 14 months. They managed to smuggle a radio, in small parts, as well as medicines for the hospital and supplements of flour.

 

 

 

It is only the day after the parachutes came with the Americans that we saw, one morning, our two escapees all tanned by the sun and in excellent health.

 

 

 

E. Hanquet.

 

De: "M and D Beard" <phoenix7788@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: <pander.nl@skynet.be>

Objet: Re: 61st Anniversary of the Weihsien Escape

Date: mardi 14 juin 2005 12:47

 

Thanks, Leopold, for posting again Fr Hanquet's "A Successful Getaway".

C'est une chance heureux - how fortuitous that Father Hanquet should be celebrating his 90th birthday TOMORROW!! No doubt you, Nicky and Janette will be joining in the celebrations. Please pass on the collective very best wishes of all of us ex-internees of Weihsien CAC. It would be lovely if he could get to the Celebrations in August, but then, at 90.......!

Regards,

 

David Beard

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: 61st Anniversary of the Weihsien Escape

Date: mardi 14 juin 2005 18:56

 

Add my HAPPY BIRTHDAY to Father Hanquet.  90 years old!  How wonderful! 

God's blessing!

 

Mary Previte

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: 61st Anniversary of the Weihsien Escape

Date: mardi 14 juin 2005 19:36

 

What an amazing gift to have this story in all these details!  Thank you so much for posting this account.

Mary Previte

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: 61st Anniversary of the Weihsien Escape

Date: mardi 14 juin 2005 20:20

 

David --

Please send my love and warmest wishes to Father Hanquet on his  90th, and tell him it was the example set by him, and the other wonderful priests in Weihsien, that led to my becoming a Catholic. I hope God gives me 90 + years to enjoy all the gifts I have received from Him.

Kindest regards -- Pamela (Simmons) Masters

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: HUBBARD, a  HERO of Weihsien

Date: mardi 14 juin 2005 20:24

 

Gladys,

 

    My older brother, Jamie Taylor, says that Hugh Hubbard was one of his heroes in Weihsien-- teaching the boys about birds.  They took long birdwatching walks.  I believe Jamie still has the bird watching diary he kept in Weihsien.  Perhaps Jamie could write his recollections to you.  Will you be attending our reunion at Weihsien so he can tell you face to face?

  

Here's a paragraph from "Song of Salvation at Weihsien Prison Camp," which  I wrote for the Philadelphia Inquirer Magazine in  1985.   "Inside our prison walls we preserved the wonders of childhood.  From the third floor window of his (hospital) dormitory, Jamie perched a hollow tree trunk behind a gutter and watched a family of sparrows nesting and raising their young.  If he did it right, he could chew up bread from Kitchen Number One and get the fledgling sparrows to eat the mush out of the side of his mouth."

 

    I hope we can take time at our reunion to pay tribute to our heroes like Hugh Hubbard with stories of how they touched our lives.  These heroes preserved our childhood, and in doing so, I suspect, preserved themselves.

 

Mary Previte

 

De: "Gay Talbot Stratford" <stillbrk@eagle.ca>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: 61st Anniversary of the Weihsien Escape

Date: mardi 14 juin 2005 22:03

 

Please pass on my best wishes to Père Hanquet for his birthday. I have always considered that the priests and nuns in Weihsien gave evidence of the kingdom of heaven among us, by lives lived in joyful service. My faith is upheld by that vivid memory, and I thank him and the others for being channels of grace for so many.

My sister Christine and Rick, her husband were delighted to have the opportunity of meeting you. Thank you for all your work on behalf of us all.

Gay Talbot Stratford

Graham and Gay Stratford

285 Cherry Hill Road, P.O. Box 119

Grafton, Ontario

Canada   K0K 2G0

 

 

De: "Ron Bridge" <rwbridge@freeuk.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Monseigneur Hanquet

Date: mardi 14 juin 2005 23:19

 

Cher Leopold,

 

Je vous serais reconnaissant de bien vouloir leur envoyer cette message

 

Le Monseigneur Hanquet

 

Cher Pére

Je vous souhaite un joyeux anniversaire. Quatre-vingt dix ans est un grand accomplissement.

Croyez mon Pére a l'expression de mes sentiments les meilleurs

Ron Bridge (Weihsien)

 

De: "Dawei Beard" <phoenix7788@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: <glaswift@cstone.net>

Objet: RE: HUBBARD, a HERO of Weihsien

Date: mercredi 15 juin 2005 2:33

 

Hi Gladys,

 

Here's a topical titbit of information which may interest you, and others.

Your father appears to feature on pages 94-95 and 97-98 so 'Chinese Escapade', L. Tipton 1949. The references occurred at a time - in May 1944 - when our camp circumstances had deteriorated to a marked degree. Supplies were repeatedly cut and comfort money was drying up. Rumours were circulating about "a ridiculous scheme to rescue members of the camp, of a secret airfield and relays of plans that would whisk us all off to Chungking." Tipton, who lived in Block 56 ('The Priests' Shack'), and was at the time involved with Father de Jaegher in planning to escape, writes "..we went off together to see H---- of the American Board Mission, who, we felt, would know all about [these rumours]. H----- was an extremely sound man with years of experience of China and the Chinese, a man of wide interests and incidentally the leading ornithologist in North Chinaj; I had made a practice of discussing with him the various plans which we had made from time to time.  Being on the committee, we felt sure he would know the details of this latest development. We were not disappointed."

 

I'm curious to know why Laurance Tipton didn't refer to Hugh Hubbard, by name, when, apart from a reference to a 'Father H-----' (Father Hanlon?) and one to Fr de Jaegher's superior 'Father R------' (Father Rutherford), he  refers openly by name to all the others - Dr Grice, Fr de Jaegher, Ted McLaren and Arthur Hummel.

 

As one of the many inveterate bird watchers of Weihsien CAC, I also salute the memory of Hugh Hubbard, China ornithologist par excellence.

 

David Beard

 

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: 61st Anniversary of the Weihsien Escape

Date: mercredi 15 juin 2005 5:26

 

Please pass on to Father Hanquet our best wishes for his birthday. Joyce Cooke, Eddie Cooke and Ivone Ozorio.

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: HUBBARD, a  HERO of Weihsien

Date: mercredi 15 juin 2005 20:33

 

To Mary Previte - Sorry I won't be going to Weihsien (at age 82) but my granddaughter, Suchi Swift (Chinese name Su-Chi)  will be going with a friend and I am sure would enjoy stories about her great grandfather Hugh Hubbard.  She is a young teacher and loves to collect stories.  I have an old well-worn copy of "Song of Salvation", August 25, 1985 from the Philadelphia Inquirer, still tucked inside the cover of "Shandong Compound"  where I put it long ago!!!  Well written! Gladys

 

>Gladys,

>

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Father Hanquet,

Date: jeudi 16 juin 2005 10:52

 

Hello,

From Louvain-La-Neuve in Belgium --- the pictures of Father Hanquet's 90th Birthday ---

Go to http://www.weihsien-paintings.org   and click on the "log-book"

If you want to have a look at ALL the pictures, go to

http://skynetphotoservice.wistiti.be/Skynet-Id-461241:hanquet

Hope you manage

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Appropriate Dress for the Reunion/Celebration (?)

Date: samedi 18 juin 2005 0:57

 

Could some of you who may be more accustomed to attending similar events please share with the rest of us what they feel would be in good taste for us to wear at Weifang this summer?

 

My own thought on the matter is to dress comfortably and reasonably simply.  As I recall (from sixty years ago), Weihsien in August can be "boiling hot!"  And fairly humid too!

 

I thought I should wear clothes that are lightweight and loose - the emphasis being on comfort and cleanliness.  I think perhaps light socks and sandals would be okay.  As well as short-sleeved shirts – open at the neck (no ties).  But perhaps I'm not in touch with what is acceptable?

 

For the banquet that the City officials (mayor and council members) will be hosting, perhaps the men should be wearing a shirt and tie (but not necessarily a jacket)?

 

I would not want to attend any of the functions wearing clothing that might be thought to show disrespect to our hosts.

 

The weather in mid-August 1945 was "blazing!"  The daytime temp could reach as high as 120 degrees Fahrenheit in the shade, unless my memory is wildly inaccurate.

 

No doubt things are radically more modern in Weifang than they were in 1945 Weihsien.  Air conditioned banquet rooms are probably common today.

 

Anyway, if you would be so good as to share your thoughts on these matters, I will be deeply grateful!

 

Thank you!

 

David Birch

gdavidbirch@yahoo.com

 

De: "Ted Margrett" <yanshida@Yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Appropriate Dress for the Reunion/Celebration (?)

Date: samedi 18 juin 2005 2:26

 

Dear Mr. Birch,

I have been in Yantai now for nine years, and I can tell you the temperature is very hot in August on the days that it does not rain. Then when the sun comes out, it's quite humid. Looking at some old Chinese Imperial Customs Service medical reports for August, I see that the high is about 100 degrees plus Fahrenheit for the years 1873 to 1899. Not much has changed. So you are quite right about wearing comfortable lose-fitting clothes.

 

Over the past year I have been doing comprehensive historical research into the history of Yantai. Just last night, I was able to walk from Er Ma Lu , the road above, through the old Chefoo School grounds down to the seaside. I could not help but think about all the students and staff who had the distinction of attending so august a learning institution.

 

I wish everyone attending the Weihsien Liberation Anniversary in Weifang a very meaningful, joyous and blessed celebration.

 

Sincerely,

 

Ted Margrett

 

Teacher

China Canada College,

Shandong Institute of Business and Technology,

Yantai.

 

De: "Dawei Beard" <phoenix7788@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Appropriate Dress for the Reunion/Celebration (?)

Date: samedi 18 juin 2005 3:39

 

Hi David/Dawei!

 

Your ideas about dress code at Weifang are generally OK. Coolness and comfort is the name of the game. For the formal functions, Chinese invariably dress in suits. But for us, a tie to match a shirt (could be short-sleeved), together with a dressy, lightweight jacket and trousers, is in my book reasonable for travelers from afar living out of suitcases.

Weihsien was very hot in the summer - certainly at least 100F in the shade.

But I'm not so sure about 120F.

Looking forward to seeing you and everyone else who is going.

Regards,

David Beard

 

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: the bell ?

Date: samedi 18 juin 2005 9:48

 

Hello,

Found the bell?

go to:  http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/Weihsien/LogBook01.htm  

There was ONE big bell in Block-23's tower and ONE small bell in front of our Police's office that was just next to the administration building. Any other?

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: the bell ?

Date: dimanche 19 juin 2005 0:18

 

The Chefoo School had an old-fashioned school bell that  was rung by hand.  It used to be rung for change of classes.  It comes to my mind now because I recall  Mr GP Welch mentioning this bell at Brian Thompson's memorial service when he paid tribute to Brian for his faithfulness in attending to his duties in camp.  He stated that shortly before the roll-call where Brian died he had been careful not to omit his responsibility of "ringing the bell."

 

I have good memories of Brian Thompson, my friend Stanley's oldest brother.  One Christmas, probably 1943, I received a little gift of a calendar made from a picture postcard with a small, hand-lettered pad of months.  Each of us younger boys received a small token gift from the School. When Brian saw mine, he told me that he had made it.  I'm sorry that I did not keep it after the year was up - it would have made a fitting memento of Brian. I was present when he died so tragically that evening just months before the end of the war.

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: I_remember

Date: dimanche 19 juin 2005 3:47

 

Leopold,

    I LOVE your "I REMEMBER"  addition to our Weihsien web site.  What a gift!  Reading these memories let me see Weihsien in new ways through the eyes of children and grown ups.

 

    I'll send  "I REMEMBER"  memories via  regular mail because my computer freezes when I try to download the map.

 

    Please, everybody, do  take part in this  beautiful project.

 

    Mary Previte

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>; tonyandedwina@optusnet.com.au

Objet: Edwina

 

Date: lundi 20 juin 2005 10:05

 

 

To WeiHsien Topica. I spoke on Sydney radio today about the re-union and Edwina Farr, who was born in WeiHsien camp telephoned asking for details. I have answered her call with the following. I do not know her birth name but please welcome her on tonyandedwina@optusnet.com.au  Joyce Bradbury

 

 

Hi Edwina. Following our conversation a few minutes ago I send you the site for weihsientopica.com to enable you to find out all about the ex-inmates of the camp and a lot of details - paintings etc of the camp. Introduce yourself and I am sure someone will remember your mother etc and send you greetings. If you email Sui Shude on suishude@sohu.com and tell him you were born there and to send you an invitation and registration form he will let you know all necessary details. As a matter of fact I will introduce you to WeiHsientopica and see what happens. Joyce Bradbury

 

De: "Nicky & Leopold" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Edwina Ann Ross

Date: lundi 20 juin 2005 10:38

 

Hello,

Welcome,

Ron Bridge's listings are fantastic!

go to http://www.weihsien-paintings.org  

click on Norman Cliff/people/who-was-born

--- and this is what you get.

September 19, 1943 = Edwina Ann Ross was born in Weihsien. Block 9 - room 7.

Correct?

Best regards,

Leopold

 

 

SURNAME

Initial

Status

Nationality

DoB

Sex

Profession

Blk/Rm

Died

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Albert

RP

Miss

British

1945

F

Infant

47/6

 

Allan

Robert Jeremy

British

28.06.44

M

Child

21/5

 

Baliantz

H A

 

Iranian

00/03/44

M

Child

58/7

 

Campbell

Eileen Ariadno

Miss

British

23.03.43

F

Child

31/4

 

Chilton

 

 

British

00.03.45

 

Child

 

10.04.45

Cowlam

Edward

 

British

1943

M

Infant

 

14.05.44

Cox

Angela Louisa

Miss

British

13.10.43

F

Child

57/2

 

Dhunjishah

Michael

 

British

00.00.45

M

infant

42/2

 

Dobson

Susan Margaret

Miss

British

27.06.43

F

Child

59/2

 

Foyn

Valentive Amelia

Miss

British

16.02.44

F

Infant

12/1

 

Fulton

J C

Miss

British

00.02.44

F

Child

7/7

 

Howie

Margert R

Miss

New Zealand

05.05.43

F

Child

14/3

 

Jones

Carmine Ruth

Miss

British

00.09.43

F

Child

6/11

 

Jongh de

Peter L J

 

Dutch

<1943>

M

Child

22/2

 

Lane

G E

 

British

00.00.45

M

infant

33/6

 

Levin

Lazar

 

Palestine

29.08.43

M

Child

2/7

 

Levin

Olga

Miss

Palestine

18.07.45

F

Child

2/7

 

McDougall

J T

 

British

00.00.45

M

infant

8/1 

 

McLaren

Janet?

MIss

British

<1944>

F

Baby

 

 

Minny

A R

 

British

00.01.44

M

Child

39/2

 

Moseson

Abe

 

Palestine

08.05.43

M

Child

16/8

 

Murray

Jean Margaret

Miss

British

02.09.43

F

Child

30/5

 

Murray

Juliette Ann

Miss

British

28.03.44

F

Child

13/3

 

Painter

F J

 

British

1945

M

Infant

16/5

 

Pander

Marie Louise Julienne

Miss

Belgian

07.07.44

F

Child

22/8

 

Reid

Charles Anthony

British

31.05.44

M

Child

12/6

 

Retzke

R F

 

American

<1943>

M

Child

20/7

 

Roche

S H

Miss

American

27.01.45

F

Child

18/10

 

Ross

Edwina Ann

Miss

British

19.09.43

F

Child

9/7

 

Staphylaris

G

 

Greek

<1943>

M

Child

4/1

 

Thomson

D C

Miss

British

9/43

F

Child

59/4

 

Voyce

C E

Miss

British

00.02.44

F

Child

9/12

 

Winslow

D H

Miss

American

<1943>

F

Child

19/1

 

 

De: "Dawei Beard" <phoenix7788@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

Objet: Yantai Chefusian Reunion?

Date: mardi 21 juin 2005 2:44

 

We hear via the 'grapevine' that there are plans for a get together of Chefusians at Yantai prior to the Weihsien Liberation Celebrations. We urgently need confirmation of this and the details, as our flight plans have to be confirmed very soon.  If such a get together is definitely on, what are the arrangements for getting to Weifang on 16 August?

 

David Beard

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Yantai Chefusian Reunion?

Date: mardi 21 juin 2005 5:37

 

I am planning to fly from Vancouver, BC direct to Beijing on 10th August, then take a connecting flight to Chefoo (Yantai) the same evening. I will spend the following three or four days in Chefoo (Yantai) before continuing either by train or bus to Weifang arriving in time for the Weihsien 60th Anniversary Celebration.

 

A friend of mine, Cam Copeland, will be with me.

 

I was planning to have a completely unstructured visit to Chefoo - lots of nostalgia, some strolling along the familiar beach, hopefully a hike up San Lane (if it's still there) and across the Mule Road, or whatever superhighway may have taken its place.  A picnic in the hills.  Maybe a trip to Lighthouse Island if such is available.  A nostalgia walk from where the old School used to be along Beach Road and up to Temple Hill.

 

At the risk of sounding antisocial, I really was rather dreading the idea of meeting with a bunch of my former schoolmates there (after all we're all going to be getting together in Weihsien anyway!)  I just wanted to be alone with my thoughts for a few days amid scenes so precious to me of my young boyhood.

 

When I first planned this, I did not know anyone else was thinking of visiting Chefoo before continuing on to Weifang.  Then Mary mentioned several names including hers and her brother's and a Chefoo alumnus (Peter Bazire I think) from England who were planning to meet first in Chefoo.

 

Please do not misunderstand me. Of course it's perfectly understandable that old Chefusians would want to meet in Chefoo. My friend and I will be staying at a beachfront hotel for three days or so. Perhaps if others are staying nearby, we could meet for breakfast, talk over plans for the day, and then each decide what we will personally do whether with others or alone.

 

I would hope that others will understand my desire to keep formal plans to an absolute minimum and to reserve a lot of time for reflection and meditation. Chefoo was a place where I was taken by my father in 1938 and left, much against my will for the following five years - followed by two additional years at Weihsien.

 

Although I have many happy memories of the place, I also suffered very badly there. I still have a need for some healing from what I underwent there as a sort of "orphan" over six decades ago.  Healing that comes in quiet reflection and the cultivation of a spirit of forgiveness.

 

What are your thoughts on what I've mentioned above?

Are my sentiments reasonable in your view?

 

I would like to discuss some of these matters personally with you, perhaps even in Chefoo, if you feel it could be profitable. You may even have suffered more than I did. Maybe my experiences could be of real value to you.

 

Very sincerely

 

David Birch

 

 

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: A few map questions.

Date: mardi 21 juin 2005 6:36

 

 

Hi folks,

 

I'm working on "colorizing" the base map for the powerpoint "tour" of the camp.  It's totally amazing what Leopold has done in locating the place where almost all of the paintings and sketches were done.  A great job, Leopold!

 

I have a couple of questions that some of you who were there may be able to answer - or perhaps Leopold himself.

 

1. What was the function of the "Peabody Building."  Was it just living space, or did it serve some other public function.

 

2.  The "white elephant" exchange is identified on the map, and Gertrude Wilder painted it as a little shack that looks like it's against a wall, but the building itself doesn't seem to be on the map, unless I'm missing it.  Can anyone help pinpoint it?

 

Thanks.

 

Donald

 

De: "leopold pander" <pander.nl@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: "Janette & Pierre @ home" <pierre.ley@pandora.be>

Objet: Re: A few map questions.

Date: mardi 21 juin 2005 12:07

 

Hello,

To be honest, Father Verhoeven's map did not even mention the "Elephant shop". I added it on the map as Father Hanquet told me where it was. I guess that the "Elephant shop" didn't exist before the Fathers & Sisters left for Peking before the Chefoo folks came in. --- Or did Father Verhoeven simply forget it?

The "Peabody Building" as mentioned on Father Verhoeven's map is I presume ---- the name given to the little street between Block-6 and the bakery. If you "click" on "RonBridge", then on the map, then on Block-6 you will see that there were quite a lot of people in there, including the Robinsons.

I'm still busy trying to locate the photos in Norman's chapter (path=NormanCliff/photos/1945---) The picture with the tent ---- ?? --- in the back ground there is the same wall as in Father Verhoeven's painting No.9. If so, the Headquarter's building is just behind. I supose that the picture was taken at the end of the day in September (after our liberation)

The person on the left must be Norman Cliff?? The building on the far-left should be the Canteen and just behind the trees is the police office --- and the bell -- (this famous bell I was looking for) must be just outside of the picture in the background on the far right????  The other picture with the tent must be about at the same place but with a different orientation. If you look at the shades, this photo was taken at about 12 o'clock (hardly no shades). I guess that the photographer was looking  ± ESE!?

So many questions !!

Tell us, ---- how is your powerpoint project going to be?

à bientôt,

Leopold.

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Reunion visit to Chefoo for Chefoo students?

Date: mardi 21 juin 2005 14:25

 

Hello, Everybody,

    Several former Weihsien internees who attended the Chefoo School are

planning to visit Chefoo/Yantai before going to Weifang for our reunion there.

 

    Can you imagine looking for cats eyes on the beach again?

 

    For more information, contact me or my brother Jim Taylor,  

jhtiii@psmail.net  or   jht3msi-professional.org 

 

    Mary Previte

 

   

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com

Objet: Re: Fw: A few map questions.

Date: mardi 21 juin 2005 15:56

 

Leopold,

 

Thanks.  I could see the location of the "White Elephant" shop on the map but it doesn't show any structure there.  Maybe it was too small, or just a shed, as it looks like in Gertrude Wilder's painting, so it wasn't considered necessary to draw a structure on the map.  In English usage, by the way, a "white elephant" is an expression for any object that you have no use for and have difficulty getting rid of because nobody else needs it either.  A good name for a barter-place. One of the newspaper articles my mother collected based on interviews with Gripsholm passengers (New York Times, October 23, 1943) says this about the shop:

 

"In the camp was an exchange shop started for barter purposes called "The White Elephant's Bell" after Helen Burton's "Camel's Bell" shop in Peking.  Here a fur coat was exchanged for a can of jam, for instance, which shows the change of values one undergoes in a prison camp.  After months of almost no sugar, the craving for something sweet becomes so great that almost anything would be given to attain some."

 

About the hospital the article said:

 

"The Japs had not made any arrangements for a hospital, but they were so proud of the fine one the Americans created out of rubble that they took many pictures of it, which they sent all over the world as propaganda showing how well they were treating the prisoners."

 

The Powerpoint presentation is coming fine, thanks to your research.  It will basically be a "walking tour" around the camp.  I encourage everyone to contribute to the "I remember" project so we can include some of those memories in it.  I plan to make self-running copies on CDs for anyone who wants one.

 

Donald

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: A few map questions.

Date: mardi 21 juin 2005 19:38

 

Donald and Leopold!

 

You two wonderful fellows have done SO MUCH to help all the better memories of Weihsien stay alive for all of us who were there!

 

Thank you very, very much!

 

David

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Dances at Weihsien

Date: mardi 21 juin 2005 19:50

 

Please, please will someone add a memory of dances held in Weihsien.

 

Of course, for us Chefoo students, dancing was considered very, very  wicked -- which made it all the more delicious for us  to watch clandestinely.  Ah, the temptations of forbidden fruit!  Who sponsored the dances, where were they held, who provided the music?  I seem to recall evening dances in the open area between Blocks 23 and 24 -- not far from the arbor vitae.  In fact, we may have even hidden behind the arbor vitae to watch.  At the age of 11 and 12, my hormones were not on fire, so we Chefoo children took part in debates in Kitchen Number 1 or worked on badges for Girl Guides, not dances.  I can still sing Stephen Foster's "Way Down Upon the Swanee River," which I learned and sang for some kind of folk song badge.

 

Mary Previte

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Fw: A few map questions.

Date: mardi 21 juin 2005 19:54

 

Donald,

I love the memories you contribute from Gertrude Wilder's diary.  Bless you! 

I seem to recall calling it the White Elephant Bell Exchange.  It was just a short distance from Block 23 where we lived when we arrived in Weihsien.

 

I'm actively working on my "I REMEMBER" contributions.  I hope everyone else is, too.  Leopold, you will be the savior and genius that figures out how to locate my memories on the proper place on the Weihsien map.

 

I phoned Associated Press in Beijing yesterday and BEGGED them to help us spread the word around the world about this reunion.  I'm sure that many, MANY former internees would love to attend if only we could reach them with news of this wonderful invitation.

 

Great job, Joyce, getting the word out on the radio in Australia.  Can you reach every major city?

 

Mary Previte

 

De: "David Allen" <dandya@fidalgo.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Dances at Weihsien

Date: mardi 21 juin 2005 20:34

 

Hi Mary:              6/21/05                11:30 PDT

    Something you did not mention was the fly catching job we younger kids had in Kitchen 1.

Before the meals we would go in to the tables and swat flies and put then in bottles to be counted later.  I remember killing 21 flies at one swat back of kitchen 1 and counting them into my bottle.  Maybe your brother John might remember some of these details.

    John slept in Building 23 Room 2 beside Val Nichols.  Val was in the corner where they stored the Red Cross Boxes and John next to him.  We would try to pull the empty boxes tied with string down on Miss Priestman or Miss Carr when they came to wake up Val who would pretend to be sleeping more soundly.  Strictly kids stuff !

    Dave Allen                dandya@fidalgo.net

 

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Dances at Weihsien

Date: mardi 21 juin 2005 22:59

 

Hi Mary --

Maybe I can help out here, as I was one of the wicked, wicked girls who loved the Saturday night dances.

No one sponsored them, they just happened. The camp was blessed with some great contemporary, and jazz musicians who just had to have an opportunity to let off steam. The leader of the combo was Earl West, his singer and bass player was Jonesy (never did know his given name), and I've forgotten the name of the third black musician.  Earl's pianist died within a month or so of being in camp, as our hospital at that time wasn't able to perform necessary surgery to save him.

There was also The Two Pineapples: George Kalani and George Alowa (darned if I can remember how they spelled their last names) who were guitar players. Kalani played conventional guitar, and Alowa Hawaiian guitar. There is a kinda cute story here, that never got into "The Mushroom Years." One evening, George Kalani, who had a very short fuse, smashed his guitar over George Alowa's head. I mean, it was totally wrecked and beyond repair. I forget who remembered that I came into camp with a huge concert guitar, which I played sometimes in the quiet of my cell. Anyhow, they told Kalani about it, and he came to me, all contrite, and asked if he could buy it off me. What could I say? Without his guitar playing, Saturday nights dances would never have been the same ... so I sold it to him for 5 dollars American! After that, every time he got mad and started to swing at Alowa, someone would grab the guitar and shout, "HOLD IT!"

As to where we danced : In  the winter months, and in rainy weather, the dances were held mostly in #2 Kitchen, steamy and stinking of leeks, but in good weather we danced wherever the ground was smooth and the band could set up. As the music was mostly loud and rambuctuous, we always tried to steer clear of the classical concerts and lectures that were also being held in the different compounds.

Hope this sheds some light on our wicked ways...

Kindest regards -- Pamela

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Dances at Weihsien

Date: mercredi 22 juin 2005 2:09

 

"Pineapple," the musician I recall very clearly, was a renowned softball umpire!  He was quite a loveable fellow, and in spite of semistarvation at Weihsien quite a rollypoly lad!  I remember him mercilessly calling the batter "OUT" in many a softball game in Camp!  He'd roll around behind the catcher and holler:

O - U - T  !  !  ! 

--- And chuck his hand back with the thumb extended over his shoulder!

 

I found Pineapple quite as engrossing a personality as home-run king Aubrey Grandon!

 

David Birch

 

De: "Gladys Swift" <glaswift@cstone.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: LILLA'S FEAST by Frances Osborne

Date: mercredi 22 juin 2005 3:21

 

There is a copy of Lilla's Feast available to me in the near future.

If there is someone who wants to borrow and read it please let me know.  I can make a list of those interested and we can send the book around.  Gladys

 

Here's the quote from our Topica

At 11:02 AM +0000 3/21/05, Frances Osborne wrote:

>To: weihsien@topica.com

>From: Frances Osborne <frances@francesosborne.com>

>Subject: To Sui Shude - books on Weihsien

>Date: Mon, 21 Mar 2005 11:02:00 -0000

>Reply-To: weihsien@topica.com

>X-Topica-Id: <1111403049.inmta002.8376.1020394>

>List-Help: <http://topica.com/lists/weihsien@topica.com/>

>List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:weihsien-unsubscribe@topica.com>

>  My great-grandmother, Lilla Casey, was interned in Weihsien and whilst there she wrote a fantasy cooking and housekeeping book for new brides - this is now held in the Imperial War Museum in London. I have written her story, which is also the story of the Weihsien camp and westerners in China. It was published a few months ago in several countries around the world and has been translated into Dutch, Italian and Spanish. Its title is LILLA'S FEAST.

>The principal publishers are Doubleday and Ballantine. If you have difficulty obtaining a copy, let me know.

There are also several members of this internet group who have written their own FIRST_HAND accounts of their time in Weihsien. In particular Norman Cliff, Courtyard of the Happy Way and Pamela Masters' The Mushroom Years - there are even more books written by Weihsien internees who are no longer with us such as Langdon Gilkey's Shantung Compound and David Michel's A Boy's War - I can give you more titles and I am sure that discussion group members can add to these. I am also interested in participating in anything you might organize.

>With very best wishes,

>Frances Osborne

frances@francesosborne.com 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Dances at Weihsien

Date: mercredi 22 juin 2005 5:28

 

Hello, David,

 

    My brother John says he won a prize of Rose Mille Pate for catching the most flies in the fly catching competition.

 

    I think Norman Cliff should tell us about the rat catching competition in Weihsien.  I believe it was Norman who invented an amazing rat catching device.

    Mary

Mary Previte

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Dances at Weihsien

Date: mercredi 22 juin 2005 5:34

 

What wonderful memories, Pamela!  Keep them coming.

 

Please put something about the dances in Leopold's new "I REMEMBER" section of the Weihsien web site.

Mary Previte

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Dances at Weihsien and reminiscences Joyce Bradbury.

Date: mercredi 22 juin 2005 6:18

 

I think I must have attended every dance. I am almost sure they were held in kitchen No. 1. The band consisted of "Westie" an African American and "Adams".(surname) who was also African American and very tall and very good looking. I think "Adams" married an internee in the camp, a very good looking young woman who had a very fair headed mother with spectacles and they had a baby in camp. I cannot connect this birth up with the list of "who was born" in the camp but I remember she had a baby.

My then boy friend Brian Clarke was also a stringed instrument player.

Because he was in the band he could not dance with me so of course I danced with anybody who would ask me including Michael Calvert (is coming to re-union) and Lloyd Frankie (now deceased) and others. When the Americans liberated us the dances continued and I danced with with a uniformed American  and Brian dumped me. I wanted him back of course but he but he was cranky and said a resounding "NO".

I think all the Brandon brothers are deceased now. I remember some nicknames, "Muscles" Brandon who I believe is immortalised in a muscular statue somewhere around the World.

There was also tuition for Highland dancing which I attended and loved. I forget the name of the tutor but it was a woman. My family and I lived in the only two story residence in a compound - No. 2 compound and the de Zutter family lived above us. Also living in our compound was Tisha Metcalf, the Turner family, Tisha's stepfather Jerry Thomas and family. Also Levin family who had their first child Olga  born there.( See"who was born list")

There was also an elderly couple Mr and Mrs Stephanides. Also my good friend Zartousha Sanosian (now Portnell).(Living in Georgia who told me recently she is unable to attend the re-union. She also told me she has passed on information about the re-union to.Dr Eugene Chan who was in the camp with his brother Professor Junior Chan who died in Hong Kong last year.)

Block three housed a Dutch couple Mr and Mrs Schlager who were known to us as "Holy Rollers"

 I distinctly remember while my father was stirring our watery "stew" in kitchen No. 1 a pigeon flew in through the window and dropped in to the large gwoh whereupon it was immediately fished out, plucked and brought to our room for my brother Eddie was very ill at the time. Dad always said that pigeon saved his life. I also remember my father was blackmarketeerding with Mr de Zutter keeping watch but when the Japs came he forgot to say the warning phrase, "Well good night" and he left. Dad (Pop) heard the guards and ran back into the room with two bottles of bygar, plonked them on to our table and jumped into bed fully clothed.  Mum gave him hell the next morning because had the Japs entered they would have found it. I remember my 10th birthway wristlet watch was used for barter.

I remember one lady brought tinned foods into the camp with which she paid my mother to do her share of the peeling etc but when the tins ran out my mother refused to do her share so she had to do it herself.

When ex internees get to the camp during the re-union look for the insulator cups still on the walls from the electrified wire.  They were still there when I visited the camp with my husband and Stan and Jane Fairchild in 1986.

See you at the re-union. Joyce Bradbury.

 

 

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Dances at Weihsien

Date: mercredi 22 juin 2005 6:24

 

I know why the dances were held near blocks 23 and 24 - I think they were the single mens' and single womens' blocks which makes sense. Joyce Bradbury

PS - Mary I am doing my best to spread the word about the re-union. jb----- 

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Fw: Dances at Weihsien and reminiscences Joyce Bradbury.

Date: mercredi 22 juin 2005 7:07

 

Fascinating memories! There must be many, many more!

 

When you mention the "Brandon" brothers, are they the same or different that the "Grandons?"  I definitely remember a very well-muscled young man, probably about ten years older than I (so he'd have been in his mid-twenties) named Aubrey Grandon. He was an amazing softball player and I can remember him batting some remarkable home runs by sending the ball right over the camp wall. I sort of hero-worshipped Aubrey G. To me he was "larger than life!" 

 

The Japanese used to allow some of our young boys, at one time, to leave the camp and retrieve some of those balls. I think my own classmate, Kenneth Bell, quite an athlete in his own right, got to go out for those balls. Today I would love to have one of those historic "home-run balls" bearing Aubrey Grandon's autograph!

 

You certainly have some wonderful memories Joyce!  I hope you will keep them coming

 

David Birch

 

De: "Ron Bridge" <rwbridge@freeuk.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Dances at Weihsien and reminiscences Joyce Bradbury.

Date: mercredi 22 juin 2005 9:43

 

You will get the names of all the bandsmen on the Camp list on Leopold's web

site

Rgds

Ron Bridge

 

**

De: "Ron Bridge" <rwbridge@freeuk.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: A few map questions.

Date: mercredi 22 juin 2005 11:13

 

The White Elephant hut which the Stantons have a painting of was situated

against the wall almost opposite the south end of Block 24 David Mitchel

inthe boys war has shown it as kiosk but the wrong side of Block 24

Rgds

 

De: "Natasha Petersen" <np57@cox.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: LILLA'S FEAST by Frances Osborne

Date: mercredi 22 juin 2005 14:17

 

Dear Gladys,

I would love to borrow your copy of Lilla's Feast.  My address is:

Natasha Petersen

2807 Edgewood St.

Roanoke, VA  24015  USA

 

Thanks,

 

Natasha

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: A few map questions.

Date: mercredi 22 juin 2005 19:25

 

 

David,

Sometimes in one's life an opportunity comes along to participate in the ongoing process of creation.  This is one of them, and it's a gift - to use Mary's terminology - to be able to be part of it.  It's very personally rewarding on many different levels.

 

I'm sure that Leopold feels the same.

 

Donald

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: More Map Questions

Date: jeudi 23 juin 2005 4:50

 

 

Dear All,

 

Here are some more map questions:

 

1.  Which buildings contained classrooms used for instruction (as opposed to living)

 

2.  What was the function of Bldg #50, which had a very impressive facade.

 

More Qs later.

 

 

Donald

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: A few map questions.

Date: jeudi 23 juin 2005 5:22

 

 

 

Ron,

 

It looks to me like David's map has the White Elephant between block 24 and the outer wall, west of block 24 (marked with letter "E").  Gertrude Wilder's painting of it looks like it abuts the outer wall, which is also west of block 24.  By saying David has it on the "wrong side" do you mean that it was east of block 24?

 

Now that you mention it, were there two kiosks, one on each side of the gate to the general store or only one?  David's map shows a round and a square kiosk.

 

Thanks again.

 

Donald

 

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: More Map Questions

Date: jeudi 23 juin 2005 5:47

 

Re your first questions, I think classrooms that were NOT used for living purposes were very rare.

 

In Weihsien, all classes that I attended were held in bedrooms - mostly in a girls' dorm in the hospital

(Block 61).

 

There was one room in the attic of the hospital where Mr Bruce and other masters used to hold morning and evening prayers.  Somehow I do not recall that this room doubled as a bedroom. It was more of an assembly hall.  There were old-fashioned seats each equipped with a wide "desk-type" arm which could be used for taking notes.  I never had any classes in this room but it's very likely that some of the older boys did.

 

In the room where I had my classes in the hospital, there was a central square table surrounded by four wooden forms. Two boys sat on each side of this table.

The room, as I said was really a girls' dorm, and the girls sat on their beds, mostly around the perimeter of the room.

 

Living space at Weihsien was at a premium. It would have been an almost unaffordable luxury to have had class-room space which would have been exempt from bedroom use.

 

When I first arrived at Weihsien, some months before I was transferred to Block 61, I lived for a while in a large room in Block 23.  Block 23, which contained the bell tower, was originally I believe a school building constructed by the Presbyterians who maintained a school for Chinese students in their mission compound.

Block 23 had at least four of these very large rooms and I'm sure they must have been classrooms originally.

We did have classes in these rooms but they were our bedrooms.

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: draft base map for visual tour

Date: jeudi 23 juin 2005 7:24

 

Dear all,

If you get this, please tell me about any corrections or additions you notice.

Thanks.

Donald

 

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Dances at Weihsien and reminiscences Joyce Bradbury.

Date: jeudi 23 juin 2005 10:53

 

For those 'Sticklers' for detail!

 

K2 was a definitely a popular location for the dances!         In fact Auld Lang Syne rang out there on one of those nights, so I presume it must have been New Years Eve ( possibly 1944). Correct me if  I'm wrong.

Did we get a dispensation on the curfew that night?   I don't know!

As a matter of  interest, can anyone remember what the normal curfew hours WERE ?

Another location for some of the dances was out in the open air, one was held where our roll call site was, in the vicinity of Blk50. There could have been others, I didn't attend all of them.

 

With regard to the band members, as to who they were, etcetra..................... that's covered in detail, else where.

Sorry Joyce,  but I have to correct what you said about "Adams".   If it was the big hunk of a man, it was Wayne Adams alright, but he didn't marry anybody in camp, that I know of.  He was only 'keeping company' with Kathryn Waldman.

 

You got him mixed up with Earl West, who did in fact marry a very attractive lass in camp, and they did have a little girl.

For those who must have the rest of the details, the girl in question was Deidrie Esmond (I think she was better know as Betty). Her mother was a lovely lady with whom she shared a room, and it was a shame when Mum had to move out for Earl, even if he was a real nice fella.

 

By the way, did anybody know that Jonsey played in a band with Louis Armstrong ???

 

A(zandy) Strangman

 

 

 

De: "Natasha Petersen" <np57@cox.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: school in Wehsien

Date: jeudi 23 juin 2005 16:42

 

Hello  everybody,

 

Those of us who were not children of missionaries, went to school in the church building.  Our teachers were those who had taught at Tientsin Grammar School.  I imagine that it must have been difficult teaching under those conditions.  All the classes were in the same building. 

 

Natasha

 

De: "Albert Dezutter" <albertdezutter@worldnet.att.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: school in Wehsien

Date: jeudi 23 juin 2005 17:07

 

I remember going to classes in a room facing south in Block 24 with Mrs. Moore of the Peking American School and Sister Hiltrudis of St. Joseph School in Tsingtao.

 

Albert de Zutter

 

De: "Albert Dezutter" <albertdezutter@worldnet.att.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: school in Wehsien

Date: jeudi 23 juin 2005 17:10

 

Earlier I said I went to school in Block 24. I was mistaken. It was Block 23.

 

Albert de Zutter

 

De: "Ron Bridge" <rwbridge@freeuk.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: school in Wehsien

Date: jeudi 23 juin 2005 20:07

 

Natasha is only partly correct in that the School in the Church only went on for a limited time my teacher was Miss Rudd, she of the walking stick

Rgds

Ron

 

De: "Ron Bridge" <rwbridge@freeuk.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: A few map questions.

Date: jeudi 23 juin 2005 20:11

 

That is correct it abuts the outer wall but the map in Shanting Compound has it to the West in the idle of the space south best of Blocks 23 and 24

Rgds

Ron

 

De: "Ron Bridge" <rwbridge@freeuk.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: More Map Questions

Date: jeudi 23 juin 2005 20:14

 

Answer

1. None unless the Chefoo school had some internal arrangement.

2. IT was a men’s dormitory block see the list of inmates.

Rgds

Ron

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: More Map Questions

Date: jeudi 23 juin 2005 22:05

 

I don't think that the Chefoo School had any internal arrangement that permitted us to have separate rooms for living and for classroom use.  It's so long ago that I do not clearly recall the beds in the room that we used for a "school room" (assembly hall); however it was one of the larger rooms and almost certainly had beds around the perimeter walls.  I definitely remember that room as the one where we boys met evening and morning for Prayers (Chapel) led by the "Master On Duty."

 

The room was in the attic of the hospital (Block 61) and opened into a wide corridor where we had a table and washbasins for our daily ablutions. This hallway also had doors opening into several smaller bedrooms  containing about four boys each.  The table also held a large bowl where Mr Bruce kept a quantity of pieces of stale bread which we could help ourselves to in order to fill our bellies when we were hungry between the skimpy camp meals. I remember that I regularly availed myself of the snacks of stale, dry bread.

 

Sincerely

 

David

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: school in Wehsien

Date: vendredi 24 juin 2005 0:33

 

Same as Albert Dezutter I was taught by Miss Moore, Principal of the Peking American School and I still have my diploma signed by her and titled "Peking American School". I also remember Sister Donatilla and Father Keymolen who taught us French. Some of our classes were in the dining room and others under a tree where we sat on a bench and on the ground in the Summer.

Joyce Bradbury.

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Dances at Weihsien and reminiscences Joyce Bradbury.

Date: vendredi 24 juin 2005 0:53

 

Thanks Zandy. I can visualize them but can't seem to put the correct names to the faces. Joyce.

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: draft base map for visual tour

Date: vendredi 24 juin 2005 1:18

 

I remember when we were visiting the camp in 1986 I had difficulty finding some places because there seemed to be many more buildings than originally and as the newer buildings were built in the same style it was difficult to orientate myself. Is it possible to indicate the camp's dimensions? We did find the church and hospital of course but the present (1986) main gate was quite close to the hospital. I think the original main gate had disappeared.

Correct me if I am wrong. Joyce.

 

De: "Raymond Moore" <raym82@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: front gate

Date: vendredi 24 juin 2005 2:31

 

Yes, the front gate into "The Courtyard of the Happy Way" has gone.   If you look up the wonderful site at http://users.skynet.be/bk217033/weihsien/index.htm  and click on to my page ("Ray Moore") and look at picture number 9, you will see my brother Frank standing on the road that runs past what used to be the front of the camp. 

The gate has disappeared and there is no access in to the area from here at all.   The two fir trees (or whatever they are!) which are visible over the top of the wall are in the area of Eric Liddell's memorial.   I believe that it is situated just beside where the front gate used to be.   Looking at my picture again, there is a section of the wall just behind Frank in which the brick work changes.  That might be the actual position of the old gateway.

 

I love all your letters and memories.   I am bathing in nostalgia and enjoying the swim!

 

Ray Moore

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: school in Wehsien

Date: vendredi 24 juin 2005 2:47

 

Hi~

Yes, I too remember Sister Donatilla and Sister Blanda who taught some of us "younger" kids (age 7).  My wife, Judy and I had hoped to get to the reunion in August but we are unable to go.  We will be thinking of all of you at the old site in August.  Could someone do a simple journal of the activities so those of us who can't make it will be able to share in the memories?  What a great discussion of memories this event has generated!

~Dwight W. Whipple

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: school in Wehsien

Date: vendredi 24 juin 2005 3:30

 

Dwight, what a great suggestion.

I was thinking along those lines too. And with all the 'diggy snaps' I expect will be taken, we (who won't be fortunate enough to be there) might be able to, in a way at least, share the experience.

Zandy

 

De: "Dawei Beard" <phoenix7788@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

Objet: Re: draft base map for visual tour

Date: vendredi 24 juin 2005 4:16

 

Hi Joyce

 

Yes, it is possible to indicate the CAC Weihsien's dimensions. The map I am using in preparation for our visit to Weifang is to the scale of 1:1600. It gives the surface of the whole compound as: 83200m2. It also gives a scale reading of 100 yards (a bit dated, sorry), so it is easy to calculate the dimensions. Sorry I can't send it as an attachment, as it's in TIF and too big to send. Not to worry; I and others will have maps which on arrival at Weifang we can hopefully get photocopied.

Regards

 

David Beard

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Do you remember?

Date: vendredi 24 juin 2005 5:05

 

With all the 'recalls' on camp personalities, can anyone tell me about Ronny Masters ?

I remember him being an outstanding athlete (at our level) amongst us, teenagers.

Incidentally, I first met him in 1937 or 38, as an 8/9 year old Chefoo boy & a fellow passenger, on a boat from HK to Taku Bar. And I still have a little b/w snap to prove it.

After he arrived in camp, he developed noticeably both in physique and athletic ability.  He soon stood out whether he was playing soccer or softball, at top level.

And he won his events at the Empire Day activities, as well !! (I know that, because I'm close to the one he eclipsed.)

My listing shows a T.F.R. Masters in 61/31, and what appears as father and daughter in 48/5.

 

I'm surprised I'm yet to notice a mention of him.  I always considered him a Chefoo school boarder.  Hopefully, someone from the Chefoo group can remember him?   Does he show up in any of the later group photos? 

If I've raised this question a couple years ago, forgive me,  I had the misfortune recently, of loosing everything with a hard drive failure.

Zandy

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: draft base map for visual tour

Date: vendredi 24 juin 2005 6:10

 

 

Joyce,

 

Some of the published maps have a scale that indicates that the camp was about 200 yards at its widest (East to West) and 150 yards North to South, not counting the "out of bounds" area.  I don't know how accurate this is, but it was obviously not large in relation to the number of people confined within it.

 

Donald

 

 

De: "Donald" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Another Map Question

Date: vendredi 24 juin 2005 6:18

 

 

Hello again,

 

Here's another question.  Did the camp's own discipline committee have any punishments available to it to help maintain discipline?  Specifically, was there a detention facility, other than the Japanese jail?  What kind of disciplinary actions was it authorized to take with people who broke camp rules? 

 

I'm sure that the answer is in Gilkey's and others' books, but it's more fun to ask you who were there.

 

Donald

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Another Map Question

Date: vendredi 24 juin 2005 7:14

 

Donald!

 

Good for you! This is a wonderful exercise in remembering the everyday events of six decades ago!

 

I'm quite certain that our inmate leaders, specifically the discipline committee, did not have the authority from our captors to imprison any of their fellow inmates for whatever reason.  Nor do I think they would have wanted to have that responsibility - think of the scandal that would have resulted had a detainee managed to commit suicide for example!

 

The Discipline Committee, headed up by Mr Ted McLaren, did have the authority to post notices on the Camp Bulletin Boards - which they did.  Our camp was so well governed from within by our own leaders that I do not think a great deal of real crime occurred.  But it must have been highly embarrassing for offenders against the Camp's internal code of conduct to find a brief notice naming the culprit and his offense neatly typed up and posted on several bulletin boards around the camp.

 

Mind you, there were a few instances of unofficial physical correction which did take place.  I recall a very fat Latin American "crook" who was rumored to have been involved in "organized crime" in Tientsin before the war.  Col. Stewart, a WWI English veteran who was in charge of the boiler room at the Ladies

Showers, where I pumped water as a twelve and thirteen-year-old, personally gave "Uncle Jacob" a black eye once for his unwillingness to cooperate by doing his share of camp physical labor.  I'm quite certain the Discipline Committee, while not officially condoning Mr Stewart's action, nevertheless quietly overlooked the matter!