De: <grannydavies@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Yule-tide greetings

Date: mardi 26 décembre 2006 2:33

 

Have a blessed Christmas= Phyllis

 

De: "Greg Leck" <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Weihsien photos

Date: jeudi 4 janvier 2007 20:20

 

I sent a message to Topica relating to the Weihsien photos but did not receive the message myself.

 

Did anyone else get it?

 

Greg

 

De: "Buddy Graant" <jlgrant@sympatico.ca>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien photos

Date: vendredi 5 janvier 2007 7:06

 

Greg,

I got the email without any photo attachments.

John (Buddy) Grant

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien photos

Date: vendredi 5 janvier 2007 9:16

 

unfortunately not :-(   

Question: Is there a link to your other web-site?

--- could you send it again? :-))

Best regards,

Leopold

 

 

De: "Greg Leck" <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Weihsien photographs

Date: lundi 8 janvier 2007 2:24

 

Gay Talbot Stratford mentioned she received a photograph taken in Weihsien.

(Gay - was this recently?  What was the source?)  From her description of it, it sounds like the same photo I found and published on page 158 of my book, Captives of Empire.

 

I have now forwarded the photographs of 53 individuals, taken in March of 1943, shortly after the arrival of internees in Weihsien, to Leopold.

 

Hopefully he can get them up on his website and we can identify some of these individuals.

 

Leopold recognized his mother in a shot of internees leaving camp on a transport plane, and Judith Hamin recognized herself and her husband Boris playing the piano.  I'm sure others in the photos are still out there.

 

Greg

 

De: "Marti Suddarth" <MarthaSuddarth@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien photographs

Date: lundi 8 janvier 2007 17:28

 

In a message dated 1/7/2007 7:24:38 PM Eastern Standard Time,

gregleck@epix.net  writes:

 

> I have now forwarded the photographs of 53 individuals, taken in March of 1943, shortly after the arrival of internees in Weihsien, to Leopold.

>

Hi, Greg!  Can you tell me where these photos are being posted?  I'd like to

look for my grand-aunt, Martha Kramer.   

 

THANK YOU!

Marti (Kramer) Suddarth

 

De: "Tracy Strong" <tstrong@weber.ucsd.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Weihsien photographs

Date: lundi 8 janvier 2007 19:43

 

Might I trouble you for the url of Leopold's website?

Thanks

 

Tracy B. Strong

 

De: "Gay Talbot Stratford" <stillbrk@eagle.ca>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien photographs

Date: lundi 8 janvier 2007 22:18

 

Greg,

 I received a copy of the photograph from Desmond Power, who was an old family friend. He explained that it was taken by a Japanese press photographer in 1943, and it had come to light from one of his sources. There were three girls in the foreground, one i recognised as Barbara Barnes. The other two were Greek I think. I have not read your book, so cannot confirm or deny that the photograph was in your book. Perhaps Desmond can help.

Best wishes,

Gay    

 

De: "Pamela Maters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien photographs

Date: lundi 8 janvier 2007 22:30

 

If they were Greek, they were probably the Marinellis girls. I don't recall their names, but they would be the sisters of Alex Marinellis

Pamela

 

Pamela Masters - Author/Publisher

Henderson House Publishing

Titles: The Mushroom Years, Sass & Serendipity

Phone: 530-647-2000

Fax: 530-647-2002

pamela@hendersonhouse.com

http://www.hendersonhouse.com

 

De: "Greg Leck" <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Weihsien photographs

Date: mardi 9 janvier 2007 1:19

 

I'm sure the photo was the one I found in the archives, and Desmond recognized you and passed it on.

 

Yes, you do look kind of dour!

 

I'm glad that another face has been identified!

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien photographs

Date: mardi 9 janvier 2007 16:38

 

_http://www.weihsien-paintings.org_ (http://www.weihsien-paintings.org )

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: greg's portraits

Date: mardi 9 janvier 2007 18:57

 

Hello,

Could "07b" be Father deJaegher?

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien photographs

Date: mercredi 10 janvier 2007 0:56

 

Dear Greg,

On which page of your book can we find that photograph?

---

I just finished adding the 53 portraits on the Weihsien-paintings' web-site. To do so, I created a new chapter --- "From Greg Leck" and there is a lot of free space to add whatever. If anybody recognises somebody --- just click on the "send-me-a-mail" sign and I will add the info on the who's who page. Of course, you can also send a mail to Weihsien Topica if you have a mail-box open there. Oh! Yes! --- don't forget to put the "number" of the picture of the person you have identified ---- Thanks :-))

Click on:  http://www.weihsien-paintings.org  

All the best ---

Leopold

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien photographs

Date: mercredi 10 janvier 2007 7:12

 

Ooops --- I read too fast ---- The picture is on page 158 !!!!

 

De: "Pamela Maters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien photographs

Date: mercredi 10 janvier 2007 8:08

 

I'm sorry, but I didn't recognize anyone in Greg Leck's photos.

Pamela

 

Pamela Masters –

 

De: "Greg Leck" <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Weihsien photographs

Date: mercredi 10 janvier 2007 10:11

 

The photo described by Gay Talbot is, I believe, the one on page 158.

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: "Weihsien-paintings" <info@weihsien-paintings.org>

Objet: Re: Re;  Mug shots

Date: mercredi 10 janvier 2007 13:59

 

Leopold, by now you will also have the e-mail I sent marked to Greg's attention which I think is self explanatory and concerns 30d and 30e possibly being one of more in the group.

To be quite honest, I can't remember what Mrs. De Jong looked like now, except that she was a big woman. (a bit on the fat side.) And at 41 years of age, with 8 kids already, she couldn't have looked as young as the girl in 30e.  Sorry, Janette.

 

Now, 10e and 10f could be sisters, don't you think? That's why I think it could be a help to know where they came from.  And I'm getting into more trouble with my wife for living in the past!  Ha, Ha!

Take it easy,   Z

  ----- Original Message -----

  From: Weihsien-paintings

  To: Alexander Strangman

  Cc: Janette & Pierre @ home

  Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 9:01 PM

  Subject: Re: Re; Mug shots

 

  Hello Zandy,

  I just had Janette on the phone this morning and she thinks that "30e" could be Mrs. De Jong who lived in our block-22! She also told me not to put it on my web-site because she wasn't sure about it. What do you think?

  all the best :-))

  Leopold

    ----- Original Message -----

    From: Alexander Strangman

    To: info@weihsien-paintings.org

    Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 2:52 AM

    Subject: Re; Mug shots

 

 

    Hi Leopold,

    Here is one 'certainty'.......

    #10b is W.H.(Tony) Tolland (aged 58 at release) A Brit. from Peking and old family friend.

 

    !7a I have no idea who he is, but he looks like the same 'bakeryman' in that picture watching the girls playing softball.

     By the way, do we know which camps these 53 people are from?

    All the best ,   Zandy

 

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: greg's portraits

Date: jeudi 11 janvier 2007 6:59

 

Sorry Leopold, absolutely not!  Fr. de Jaegher wore glasses and had a round face.  If I can locate the photo (I mentioned earlier to you) I'll forwarded it and you will see what I mean.

 

I've been looking long and hard at #08e and the boy looks very much like John Beruldsen (14)who was a year older and a grade above me at the Peking American School.

 

By the way, I did not read Greg's note properly, so forget my question about which camp they all came from, and amend the ages I put on my earlier email which was estimated age at 1945 in lieu of 1943.  And further more, some look too happy to be arriving in camp, but with so many wearing hats, I admit they do look like they are going some where !    Zandy

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien photographs

Date: jeudi 11 janvier 2007 22:04

 

Attention Greg Leck

#10b was an easy I.D. W.H.(Tony) Tolland was a pre war friend of our family.

And it could aid the identification process if we knew or saw the setting from which the remaining 52 came.

ie;  #17a's face has obviously been extracted from the photo of the man watching the girls softball game at Weihsien, and therefore unlikely to have been one of those 'snapped' upon arrival.

The girl's face in 30e is partially visible in 30d and they could be part of a larger group.

Also if 04a and 04b had been together, I'd have a good idea who they were. Further more, if the little girl in 03b happens to be the focus of their attention, I'd then have no doubt who they were.

 

In closing, let me also repeat that it was a pleasure to finally meet you in person, in December, and that my wife and I really enjoyed your book's terrific presentation on that warm evening at the State Library of NSW.

All the best,

Zandy

 

I have now forwarded the photographs of 53 individuals, taken in March of 1943, shortly after the arrival of internees in Weihsien, to Leopold.

 

  Hopefully he can get them up on his website and we can identify some of these individuals.

 

  Leopold recognized his mother in a shot of internees leaving camp on a transport plane, and Judith Hamin recognized herself and her husband Boris playing the piano.  I'm sure others in the photos are still out there.

 

  Greg

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw:

Date: vendredi 12 janvier 2007 9:17

 

Dear Joyce,

Thanks very much for your help :-))

--- I just added the name to the list

Best regards,

Leopold

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Bob Bradbury

To: info@weihsien-paintings.org

Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2007 11:44 PM

 

 

I think 16D is photo of one of the Turner twins, probably Michael who were in compound No. 2 right next door to our room. The other twin was Peter and he had a limp and wore a brace on  one leg. Barbara Turner, their younger sister was also in the same room.  Jopycer Bradbury/Cooke

 

----- Original Message -----

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, January 15, 2007 9:19 PM

Subject: Article about Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

 

________________________________________

Hero honored

By Douglas Williams 2007-1-13

 

________________________________________

Olympic gold medal-winning runner Eric Liddell will be celebrated tonight in a show called "Beyond the Chariots," looking at the man's life and faith, from when he returned to China until his untimely and sad demise, writes Douglas Williams.

 

There was no small amount of hype surrounding Eric Liddell in the run- up to the 1924 Paris Olympics. The British public was quietly confident that their lightning-fast sprinter, born in Tianjin in 1902, would bring home gold in the 100 meters.

 

He did bring home gold, but not for the 100 meters.

 

Liddell's Scottish father, a missionary working in China, had instilled in him a strong faith that was to be tested to the limit in Paris that summer.

 

One of the qualifying heats for the 100m final fell on a Sunday, the Sabbath, and Liddell refused to take part. One Sunday, one race, Olympic gold at stake and the hopes of a nation - but the Edinburgh University undergraduate would have none of it. As a strict evangelical, he would simply not race on the Sabbath. He would, however, run in the 400 meters, a distance he had never competed at but which didn't have heats on Sundays.

 

Astonishingly he won, took gold and smashed the world record in the process. His refusal to run the 100m was big news but his victory sent shockwaves around the world.

 

It inspired the film "Chariots of Fire," which won four Oscars, and the one-man show "Beyond the Chariots" by Rich Swingle, which plays tonight in Shanghai.

 

"Beyond the Chariots" looks at Liddell's life beyond the Olympics when he returned to China to initially teach science at the Tianjin Anglo Chinese College and later serve as a missionary like his father. He was ordained as a minister in 1932.

 

"Despite all the fame and adulation he was showered with after the Olympics and all the career opportunities that were presenting themselves at the time, Liddell chose to return to China and teach," says Swingle who has performed his show off Broadway, across the States, Canada and in Hong Kong. He has also performed the show in front of Liddell's three daughters who now live in Canada.

 

"His daughters told me they found the show a cathartic experience," says Swingle. "It brought them a sense of closure."

 

Liddell sent his wife and daughters from their Tianjin home to safety in Canada in 1941 with war encroaching.

 

Swingle, also a runner, is returning to the Chinese mainland for the first time in 20 years. "I competed in an International Sports Exchange program in Guangzhou in 1986. It was a great experience and it was then that I heard about the Liddell story. It has fascinated and inspired me ever since," says the native New Yorker.

 

As a competitive runner, Swingle listened to the "Chariots of Fire" Vangelis soundtrack before races.

 

"Liddell was obeying his calling when he returned to China, it was what God wanted him to do, or so he believed," says Swingle, an actor.

 

Liddell taught and worked as a missionary in the Tianjin area until he was interned in a Japanese concentration camp in Weifang, Shandong Province, in 1943.

 

"Even as a prisoner Liddell continued teaching and carrying out pastoral duties," says Swingle who bares a remarkable similarity to Liddell. "In our research we've met several of his students from both his time in Tianjin and in the camp and they all say he was an inspiring teacher."

 

The show looks at how Liddell gets on with one of his students in the camp, the fictional Maiker, a Chinese who is also played by Liddle. "The two have a volatile relationship, with Maiker holding some resentment towards Liddell due to familial history. Maiker is basically anti-Westerner," explains Swingle.

 

"In the show I want to show that although there were Westerners who came to China to merely exploit the country, Liddell wasn't one of them. The same is true today, while some are here for their own ends, many aren't," says Maiker.

 

"I also hope to get across some of Liddell's philosophy. He was a great believer that if something is worth doing then it's worth doing well. I also think the message of Liddell's life is to love each other wholeheartedly no matter where we come from."

 

Liddell died in the camp in 1945, six months before the end of the war, from a brain tumor brought on by overwork and malnourishment. He is interred in the Mausoleum of Martyrs in Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province.

 

Time: January 13, 8pm

 

Venue: Community Center Shanghai, 568 Julu Rd

 

Tel: 6247-2880

 

Tickets: Free

 

 

 

De: <grannydavies@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Article abiout Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

Date: mardi 16 janvier 2007 2:20

 

Thanks for the article on Eric Liddell, we all knew him in Weihsien, If saints walk on earth he was one of them  MY family came from Tientsin(Tanjien) 

Phyllis (evans) Davies

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Article abiout Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

Date: mardi 16 janvier 2007 7:29

 

Phyllis. Do you remember me? - Joyce Cooke (Now Bradbury) from Tsingtao.  Brian Clarke was my boy friend at the time.  A couple of years ago I met a mutual friend, Serge Chunehan at a China re-union. He lives in Sydney now. Do you still have your beautiful blonde hair? I have three sons and four grandchildren with more to come.

Regards. Joyce.

 

De: <grannydavies@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Article abiout Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

Date: mercredi 17 janvier 2007 5:03

 

How nice to hear from you, yes, I remember you and Serge Chunehen and I have corresponded all these years, He.s outside Sydney I also fondly remember Lucy Attree  and Brian Clark  I. Grannydavies @AOL.com  and a great grandma.of two.

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: portraits,

Date: mercredi 17 janvier 2007 13:24

 

Hello,

I met Father Hanquet this morning and showed him all the portraits. At first, he didn't recognize anybody but told me that 17a could be J. Goyas --- who was very active in the black-market business ---

All the best,

Leopold

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: portraits,

Date: jeudi 18 janvier 2007 4:00

 

Fr. Hanquet is too kind in pointing out Goyas was simply 'involved in the 'black-market' business'!  Because in our Weihsien terminology, camp 'black-marketeering' was almost considered an honorable 'profession' but there was nothing honorable about our FAT 'friend' Goyas' activities there.

 You see, even in camp he was not adverse to doing a bit of trading (solely for his own benefit) in jewelery, preferrably of the golden variety.  I've got no idea where his money came from, but no surprise, he always came out the winner in each of his lop sided deals.

 

But what Goyas was more notorious for in camp, and Fr. Hanquet may remember this, was his blatant avoidance of any work detail and shamelessly refusing to do his share of work in camp?

I'm sure Langdon Gilkey covered this episode in his book, and who better placed to report on the fat man's LAZY trait than the author of 'Shandung Compound', who just happened to be on the 'Work Detail Committee' himself, at the time.

Finally, it was also common knowledge the WDC discussed various options to try and force him into complying with his obligations but for one reason or another, it was all to no avail.

 

However, in my opinion the face in 17a isn't that of Goyas!   The 17a 'snap' looks like an extraction from the photo of the girls playing softball.   17a matches the face of the man wearing white overalls and being near the bakery suggests he was having a break from all that heavy work, 'kneading' dough!   But that sort of dough was definetly not Goyas' type!

Furthermore, he was a lot more rotund than the man watching the game.

 

 

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: "Weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: portraits, and "Uncle Jacob" Goyas

Date: jeudi 18 janvier 2007 5:05

 

Very interesting observations Zandy! Your reminiscing causes memories to flood back to me too!  I clearly recall some of the younger children facetiously referring to Goyas as Uncle Jacob. I don't think anyone really had any sort of respect for the old slacker!  I also recall hearing, way back in those far-off days, that when Jacob Goyas refused to do his share of work at the pump by the ladies' showers, Mr Stewart, whom we all respected greatly and who trained many of us boys in Block 61 in a sort of Weihsien Camp Cadet Corps, Mr Stewart was reputed to have given this rotund sluggard a well-deserved black eye!  Whether it actually happened or was just part of camp legend, Goyas certainly had it coming!

 

Again Zandy, thanks for the recollections - you certainly have a sharp memory after more than sixty years since liberation!

 

Regards

 

David Birch

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: portraits, and "Uncle Jacob" Goyas

Date: jeudi 18 janvier 2007 5:54

 

I also recall stories about him lending people money in the camp on condition the borrower signed an  IOU for redemption after the War ended. My girl friend told me ( and she is still alive) that he had a pile of IOU's in his hand one day and he was counting them up. My mother remarked in the  camp that he was disgusting. He was short, fat and with a tanned complexion. My father was wary of him because he was told that he was a spy for the Japanese. He was very affable when met walking around the camp but nobody trusted him. Joyce Cooke (Bradbury).-----

 

De: "lucy lu" <lucy9859@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: portraits, and "Uncle Jacob" Goyas

Date: jeudi 18 janvier 2007 6:20

 

how intersting story!

I’m lucy from foreign and overseas Chinese affairs office of weifang city (the former weihsien), Shandong province, china.

 

In 2005, we held a series of commemorative activities to mark the 60th anniversary of the liberation of weihsien camp. Before and after that, we’ve made a lot for it, and been keeping in touch with the former internees or their friends.

 

In 2007, we’ll make a documentary and film about the weihisen camp. So we’ll go abroad to interview the former internees or their friends and relatives, and collect materials for them. I think all of you here would like to provide us with something about the camp, like Eric Liddel or children in Cheffo prep-school and so on.

Anything about the camp will be warmly welcomed.

thanks!

 

keep in touch.

lucy

 

 

De: "Greg Leck" <gregleck@epix.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: portraits, and "Uncle Jacob" Goyas

Date: jeudi 18 janvier 2007 6:48

 

I think Goyas, who was a Uruguayan merchant, was beaten up by two taipans in camp, after he refused to do his assigned duty rotation at manning a pump..

Such beatings also occurred in other camps, though usually as the result of personal animosities.

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: portraits, and "Uncle Jacob" Goyas

Date: jeudi 18 janvier 2007 7:22

 

Greg,

 

That is interesting!  I was thirteen years old when I manned that very pump at the ladies' showers'! 

 

Weihsien had a very well-organized and run camp committee, as I'm sure you well know through all your research for your book. This committee was in turn broken down into other committees, one of which was Weihsien Camp's highly respected Discipline Committee.  Any acts of violence would certainly have been reported to the Discipline Committee which was headed by a very fair, but firm, Scotsman named Mr McLaren. No one wanted to be reported to McLaren and so such incidents would have been few and far between.

 

Uncle Jacob was a bit of a legend to us youngsters in the camp. Actually, as Joyce recalls, he was quite friendly. But just don't try to enter into business dealings with him.

 

David

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: portraits, and "Uncle Jacob" Goyas

Date: jeudi 18 janvier 2007 11:04

 

This is getting more amusing by the day, so what will we have by the end of the week ?  

So far we've got this Ol' uncle Jacob sporting a black eye and coming away with a fist full of IOUs, (according to reliable sources.)   But my better judgement tells me it is most unlikely 'he' would have lent anyone hard cash for a 'pile' of IOUs, especially for redemption after the war.   How much money could he have had?

 

My earlier statement was made on a first hand bases.    You may remember we were all 'dying' for that extra little bit of 'grub' that our comfort money just couldn't cover and after hearing about this 'fella' who was actually dealing in a pawn shop type way, my mother called him in.   For the sake of her growing teen age son, she had to turn up something of value, and all she had to part with, was one English Gold Sovereign. 

What etches this incident so indelibly in my mind, is that I got back to our room just in time to catch him standing over my mother, pressuring her to show him what else she had in her 'steamer trunk'.

 

At the time, that was certainly no laughing matter but I've just pulled out my old camp list and had to have a bit of a chuckle to see my notation ........"ROGUE"......marked between his name  and  " 44    M    Uraguayan   Merchant  "

 

David, regarding your comment on memory, it's an interesting subject.....why do we remember certain things?

When you find out, let me know the answer and the reasons.   Maybe then I'll be able to 'delete' those scary moments!

Take it easy,

Zandy

 

 

De: "Pamela Maters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: portraits, and "Uncle Jacob" Goyas

Date: jeudi 18 janvier 2007 19:19

 

I'm johnny-come-lately to this discussion, but wasn't Goyas the gentleman -- and I use the term loosely --who was kicking himself in the butt because he had 7 passports to countries in Central and South America, and happened to show the wrong one to the Japanese, so ended up in camp? It's understandable, under those circumstances, why he felt he didn't have to raise a finger to help...!poor guy.

Pamela

 

Pamela Masters –

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Pictures

Date: dimanche 21 janvier 2007 9:22

 

Hello :-))

Three new name added on Greg’s portrait gallery ---

Thanks, Sylvia for your help!

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org  

 

Best regards,

Leopold

 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Sylvia Walker" <salollers@internode.on.net>

To: <info@weihsien-paintings.org>

Sent: Sunday, January 21, 2007 3:30 AM

Subject: Pictures

 

 

> Hi Greg

> 03b is me - Sylvia Tchoo

> 04a is my Mum Lillian Tchoo

> 04b is my Dad Roy Tchoo

>

> What a magnificent job you have done - it's all amazing Regards and thanks

>

> Sylvia Walker in Australia

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Names

Date: mardi 23 janvier 2007 9:23

 

Dear Brian,

Thanks very much for the info --- that I just added to the portraits at

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org  All this is real team-work --- everybody is helping --- thanks again :-))

Best regards

Leopold

 

----- Original Message -----

From: <brianb65@telus.net>

To: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2007 3:35 AM

Subject: Names

 

Hello Leopold,

 

I don't know if you received my last email about the pictures in Greg Leck's book but I am certain that 8B is my mother, Elsie Butcher; 8D is my father, Will Butcher, and 8C is me, Brian.

 

Brian

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Picture i.d.

Date: mardi 23 janvier 2007 9:28

 

Dear Albert,

Thanks for the info :-))

I corrected the name and hope to get more names soon from other visitors of the Weihsien-picture-galley-web-site.

---

Dear Greg,

Do you have any other photographs you would like to identify?

Best regards,

Leopold

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Albert de Zutter

To: info@weihsien-paintings.org

Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2007 7:09 AM

Subject: Picture i.d.

 

 

Picture No. 16d is Peter Turner, not Michael Turner. The Turners lives in the same block as the De Zutters. The boys were my age and I knew them well. They were fraternal twins, and did not look much alike.

 

Albert de Zutter

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Name change

Date: mercredi 24 janvier 2007 23:45

 

 

 

Mr Sui Shude in Weifang:

 

The "Weifang No. 2 Middle School," where the west part  of the Weihsien Camp was located, has changed back to its older name,  "Weifang Guangwen High School," officially from  September, 2006. 

 

De: "lucy lu" <lucy9859@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Article abiout Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

Date: vendredi 2 février 2007 4:35

 

 I’m Lucy from foreign and overseas Chinese affairs office of Weifang city (the former WeiHsien), Shandong province, china.

 

In 2005, we held a series of commemorative activities to mark the 60th anniversary of the liberation of WeiHsien camp. I think you've joined us on that occasion. And I’m reading your book <forgiven but not forgotten>, to know more about the camp.

 

Thanks for your book and great efforts to doing something for the camp.

 

In 2007, we’ll make a documentary and film about the WeiHsien camp. So we’ll go abroad to interview the former internees or their friends and relatives, and collect materials for them. I think all of you here would like to provide us with something about the camp.

 

Anything about the camp will be warmly welcomed.

thanks!

keep in touch.

Lucy

 

 

Bob Bradbury wrote:

> Phyllis. Do you remember me? - Joyce Cooke (Now Bradbury) from Tsingtao.  Brian Clarke was my boy friend at the time.  A couple of years ago I met a mutual friend, Serge Chunehan at a China re-union. He lives in Sydney now. Do you still have your beautiful blonde hair? I have three sons and four grandchildren with more to come.Regards. Joyce.

 

----- Original Message -----

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, February 04, 2007 4:08 AM

Subject: Have you memories of the HUMAN SIDE of our guards?

 

What Weihsien memories do you have that show the human side of the Japanese during World War II? 

 

Today, I watched Clint Eastwood's movie, LETTERS FROM IWO JIMA, which recently won the Golden Globe award  for Best Movie of the Year here in the USA.  Eastwood's movie, FLAGS OF OUR FATHERS,   shows the American  experience on Iwo Jima LETTERS shows the Japanese experience.   My psyche has  allowed me to see only a small handful of movies -- ever --  about World War II,  but I'm glad I saw this one.  It reminded me that there are saints and sinners on both sides of every war.

 

I saw the human side in some of our guards in Weihsien.  A few left  me  tender memories.

 

Remember my perspective.  Separated from my parents by warring armies,  in Weihsien  I was eleven and twelve years old, a student in the Chefoo School, cocooned and sheltered by teachers who took very seriously their role as our guardians.   So my Weihsien memories are those of a child.

 

To the Japanese guards who missed their own families,  our roll call district, with more than 100 children, was their pride and joy.  When visiting Japanese officials  monitored the camp, our roll call was the highlight of the show -- little foreign devils with prep school manners, standing with eyes front, spines stiff at attention, numbering off in Japanese:  Ichi...nee...san... she... go...

 

I thought about it once when I was young,  how curious it was that children watching enemy bayonet drills at dusk could know no fear.   In Chefoo,  we had watched  those drills -- Japanese soldiers practicing how to kill in close range combat.    What I did fear, though, were the Weihsien guards' Alsatian police dogs.  I hated the dogs.  You could play with the guards, but never with their dogs.  The dogs were trained to kill.

 

Housed  on the second floor of the hospital, we girls often played close to the Japanese guard tower which was positioned atop  the wall near the hospital.  We played  in the underground air raid shelter not a stone's throw from the guard tower.  With some of the Japanese guards  we had a game.  We would  "accidentally" throw our ball over the wall  then  rush in desperation to the guard tower and its ever-present Japanese guard.   He would  lift us over the wall and let us  frisk in freedom until we found  the missing ball.  This would have become a ritual -- but our teachers found out.

 

In 1945 when the "bamboo radio"  said that Japan was on the run,  for grownups the prospect of an Allied victory was tinged with terror.   Does a defeated army rape and kill its prisoners?    We girls  worried about the Japanese guards who had become our friends.   Someone told us  that hari kiri  was the honorable way for a Japanese soldier to face defeat.  Ceremonial suicide.  The older Chefoo boys who knew about these things demonstrated on their bellies where the cuts of the Samurai sword would be made -- a  triangle of self-inflicted wounds followed by a final thrust to the heart.

 

It made me shudder.  The Japanese guard who  lifted us  so gent;ly into the guard tower and dropped us into the field beyond the wall -- would he commit  hari kiri?

 

Norman Cliff, who has captured so much of Weihsien internment history for us, writes in COURTYARD OF  THE HAPPY WAY about the Japanese commandant Kosaka who oversaw our first internment camp in Chefoo:  "This immaculately dressed man, with a kindly face, impeccable manners and a good command of English, stands out in my memory as  unique and superior to any Japanese officials with whom we dealt up to that time and subsequently.  He never raised his voice in anger and always approached us with courtesy which removed all fear and tension of those difficult days.  He would inquire after our health and wellbeing, and showed a special concern for the older missionaries.

 

"We gathered that Kosaka had come under the influence of Christian missionaries in Japan and was a Christian himself, and regarded himself as having been divinely placed in the largely missionary camp to soften the hard blows of the war `for his fellow Christians."

 

I'd liketo hear from you.  What memories have you of the human side of our Japanese guards?

 

Mary Previte

 

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Article abiout Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

Date: dimanche 4 février 2007 14:30

 

Dear Lucy. Thanks for your message. My book Forgiven But Not Forgotten is an authentic account of WeiHsien and Tsingtao Camps as I experienced them during the War and all names given in the book are real names of the persons involved.  I will be happy to assist you with information at any time and if you do come to Australia (Sydney).  All the very best wishes for success with your project. Joyce Bradbury.

 

De: <grannydavies@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Have you memories of the HUMAN SIDE of our guards?

Date: lundi 5 février 2007 1:07

 

I was in my late teens in camp. Only one time did I see anything like sympathy from the guards. Had broken my leg, in a cast, getting late so was trying to hurry, boyfriend on my left helping, guard came up on my right, placed hand on my shoulder, I  slid  around in front of Steve  so he was between us. The guard  then pointed to my cast. Coming up to us with rifle, affixed with bayonet did not give me a "friendly" feeling. He made friendly noises then left. We hurried  home before curfew. The guard seemed to be about our age.  I stayed away from them as much as I could.  I enjoyed your book. Also attended the Old China Hands reunion in Portland OR. Only  that I recognizes from North China there, mostly Shanghai and Hongkong.Do not believe you were there. 

Phyllis(Evans) Davies

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Article abiout Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

Date: lundi 5 février 2007 1:54

 

Dear Lucy, yes I did attend the commemorative activities to mark the 60th anniversary of the liberation. My three sons and granddaughter Danielle accompanied me and we had a wonderful time. My book 'forgiven but Not Forgotten' gives an account of my experiences and recollections of camp life both at Tsingtao Camp and WeiHsien Camp. Names I mention are of the actual persons involved. Please let me know if you intend coming to Sydney, Australia. Joyce Bradbury.

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Have you memories of the HUMAN SIDE of our guards?

Date: lundi 5 février 2007 3:03

 

Thank you Mary for your recollections!  I have several pleasant memories of the guards at both Temple Hill and Weihsien!  Let me share a couple.

 

After Tipton and Hummel escaped from Weihsien Camp, many of the Chefoo youngsters from the Boys and Girls Schools were moved from Block 23 over to the hospital (Block 61).  I think Tipton and Hummel had once lived in the attic atop the hospital where their room commanded a sweeping view of the farmland beyond the camp walls. The Japanese wanted to be sure, following the escape, that the enterprising young men of the camp would no longer have such strategically located quarters. Unaware at the time of that reasoning, my friends and I, all about Mary's age, were relocated to the hospital attic with its marvellous over-the-wall view. Apart from a brief stay opposite the Chalkleys' quarters on the hospital second floor, Jack Graham, Raymond Trickey, Torje Torjesen, Kenneth Bell, Kenneth Patchett, Jim Young and I, and some others, found our home in the attic until the end of the war!

 

But moving away from Block 23 held one major disadvantage for me personally.  You see, a number of us youngsters, me included, had had small flower and vegetable gardens in the park out behind Block 23.  We planted the gardens, weeded and watered them and were fully responsible for tending them ourselves.  I recall that my younger brother, John, shared a garden with Robert Clow. They were in the Prep School and remained in Block 23 until war's end.  Of course those of us in the Boys' School lost our gardens when we had to move.  Block 61 and Block 23 were too far apart for us to walk all that way to attend to our horticulture.

 

Some months passed and I was determined to replace my garden. So I borrowed a Chinese hoe (a big, bulky, heavy tool) from someone. I had my eye on a suitable patch of soil next to the camp wall.  But it needed to be cultivated.  Well, the soil proved to be rock-hard clay - parched by the blistering Weihsien summer sun.  I bravely wielded my heavy hoe (or mattock) and began bashing away with it at the unyielding baked clay!  About twelve years old, I  was a bit undersized from malnutrition, and I s'pose I wasn't making much headway, if any! 

 

At this moment a Japanese guard, probably either waiting to go on sentry duty at the nearby tower, or maybe just off his shift, approached me.  He gave me a very friendly smile and gestured to me indicating he would like me to pass him my mattock!  I quickly realized that he wanted to help me, and of course I handed him the heavy tool.  Well, that friendly guard went to work on what was an impossible task for me. He dug up the entire patch and did not quit till he had pulverized the chunky clay into workable soil.

 

I have never forgotten that very friendly gesture and I shall always be grateful for the memory of that good man and his kindness to twelve-year-old David Birch.

 

The Tennis Match - Britain vs Japan

 

I also recall a tennis match between Japanese guards and some of the older Chefoo boys and/or masters at Temple Hill.  It all seemed very normal and was certainly a pleasant thing to watch!

 

Company's Coming to Dinner on Sunday

 

Also at Temple Hill, I clearly recall Mr Kosaka and his deputy being our guests for roast chicken at dinner time in the Boys School house.  They seemed very appreciative of the hospitality of the Chefoo School staff. I even got to eat at the same table.  I'm sure that the chickens were ones from our little flock that was cared for behind the house.

 

A Gift of Appreciation for Mr Martin

 

Goopy (Mr Martin) one of my most respected teachers of all time, told several of us boys one day that a Japanese guard whom he had recently befriended actually gave him a cigarette as a little gesture of appreciation. Goopy said, "Of course, I did not tell him that I don't smoke, but I will keep that cigarette as a reminder of this man's kindness."

 

There are more good memories of Japanese guards. I for one thank God for those fellows, many of whom I know must have been homesick for the little farms and fishing villages back home in Japan.

 

David

 

De: "lucy lu" <lucy9859@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Article abiout Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

Date: lundi 5 février 2007 6:44

 

Dear Joyce,

Glad to get your email.

Hope more information about the camp from all of you.

Best regards.

Lucy

 

 

From: "Pander" <pander.nl@skynet.be>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Monday, February 05, 2007 10:54 AM

Subject: Re: Article abiout Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

 

 

> Dear Lucy,

> Have you already clicked on this link?

> http://www.weihsien-paintings.org

> --- it is all about Weihsien-concentration-camp and free access to all ---

> It is a great disorganized sum of information --- documents -- photos -- paintings -- sketches of all sorts. Extracts of books in English and French --- The résumé of our Topica-messages --- etc --- etc ---

> Hope you find your way in this labyrinth ----

> Let me know :-))

> Best regards,

> Leopold

> 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Article abiout Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

Date: mardi 6 février 2007 6:24

 

 

 

 

Dear Lucy. Thanks for your message. My book Forgiven But Not Forgotten is an authentic account of WeiHsien and Tsingtao Camps as I experienced them during the War and all names given in the book are real names of the persons involved.  I will be happy to assist you with information at any time and if you do come to Australia (Sydney).  All the very best wishes for success with your project. Joyce Bradbury.

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Article abiout Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

Date: mardi 6 février 2007 6:30

 

 

Dear Lucy, yes I did attend the commemorative activities to mark the 60th anniversary of the liberation. My three sons and granddaughter Danielle accompanied me and we had a wonderful time. My book 'forgiven but Not Forgotten' gives an account of my experiences and recollections of camp life both at Tsingtao Camp and WeiHsien Camp. Names I mention are of the actual persons involved. Please let me know if you intend coming to Sydney,

Australia. Joyce Bradbury.

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>; "Georgeanna Knisely" <jknisely@paonline.com>

Date: jeudi 8 février 2007 8:14

 

Dear Georgie. So nice to hear from you. No I have not seen the article in the Shanghai daily about Eric Liddell either. I hope somebody can put it on the net for us.

Regarding that scoundrel Goez I have an extract from a letter that describes him as a jew from Russia who had a Portuguese passport and who made no secret of being an informer for the Japanese. He also dealt in gems and openly criticised Armic Balianz causing the Japs to beat him up so badly that he bled from "neck to leg"

Regards Joyce.

 

De: "lucy lu" <lucy9859@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Article abiout Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

Date: jeudi 8 février 2007 11:34

 

Dear Tapol,

Thanks so much for your kind help. Glad to say that just now i visited the website you advised. It’s a wonderful world.

thanks again.

I’m wondering if you attended our activities in august 2005.

 

I’ve read Joyce's memoir, I remember, but not sure, maybe one of your relatives have helped supplying foods and drugs to the camp.

please tell me yes or no.

keep in touch .

best regards.

 

Lucy

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Article abiout Eric Liddell in Shanghai Daily

Date: samedi 10 février 2007 12:59

 

Dear Lucy,

Hello, :-))

Unfortunately, we missed the 2005 summer meeting in Weifang but did manage to visit our old Weihsien compound in January 2006 ---

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/pander/Weifang2006/Slide_Show/01_KiteFabric/p_Kite_01.htm

 

I took quite a lot of photos and organized them the best I could on the web-site. We were greeted at the Quindao airport by Mr. Sui Shude and spent two exceptional days in Weifang.

 

I was not yet two years old in 1943 when we came to Weihsien and our parents never told us much about our captivity during WWII.

 

I was very interested in assembling the pieces of the puzzle with the help of so many people from all over the World. Father Hanquet, who is 91 years old now, told me a lot about the old concentration camp. He lives in Belgium just a few miles from where I live. I often meet him --- he has so much to tell --- about Weihsien.

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "peter bazire" <psbazire@yahoo.co.uk>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: The Salvation Army Band in Weihsien

Date: mardi 13 février 2007 19:25

 

Hello Everybody,

  I hope this article on the SA Band in Weihsien will bring back some memories. The two pictures are NOT attached, but I hope they can be sent later on.

  Best wishes,

  Peter

 

 

 

The Salvation Army Band in Weihsien: 1943 to 1945

                                 

Article put together by Peter Bazire

 

I was born in Szechwan in 1930 and made the long journey with my family to Chefoo (now Yantai) in 1935. My parents joined the teaching staff , and my elder brother and I settled into school life very happily.

My mother, Mrs Eileen Bazire, B.Mus., took charge of music in the school and she soon had Theo and me learning musical instruments: piano and violin respectively. I did not practise as much as I should, but a flair for music (perfect pitch, a good sense of harmony and an unusual memory) carried me along.

Later my mother assembled an orchestra for 10 to 17 year olds, which I joined when I was 10. We played simple, but enjoyable, pieces and gained experience in ensemble playing.

I now fast forward to Sept. 1943 when we in Chefoo were taken to Weihsien to join the many who had already come from other parts of N. China. After this great upheaval and settling into Camp life, it was so uplifting, soon, to hear the Salvation Army Band, and indeed the Weihsien Symphony Orchestra  in a concert later that month. Little did I know in those first few weeks that I was  to become a member of the band (with Donald Littler, the youngest players) and later on to play in the orchestra. Those two years in Weihsien, building on the foundation in Chefoo, transformed my musical life. An older Chefoo boy, Wally Desterhaft, was repatriated, along with others, to the USA soon after we arrived in Weihsien. He kindly gave me his trumpet and so began a new chapter in my music life.

The SA Band was put together in the spring of 1943 by Brigadier Len Stranks, soon after many people had arrived in Weihsien.There was a strong nucleus of Salvation Army officers, plus two sons, and they were augmented by a few other  players. Brig Stranks conducted, and he also played the E flat bass (tuba).

Early that autumn I was kindly invited to join the band. My classmate Doug Sadler had blown my trumpet at a Chefoo concert and Adjutant Fred Buist, the principal cornet player, who heard Doug, invited him to join too, and supplied him with a cornet. Norman Cliff from Chefoo also joined, and played the trombone.

Here I must mention the kindness of Brig Stranks’ younger daughter Mrs Joyce Ditmanson/Cotterill for letting me quote excerpts from Marcy Ditmanson’s diaries. Joyce herself also supplied me with valuable information, both from Peking days and from Weihsien itself.

In Peking, in early 1943, Brig Stranks heard that the Japanese had ordered all ‘alien’ personnel to be ready to go to Weihsien. He cycled to all the compounds and asked people to bring musical instruments and music to Weihsien. He put some brass instruments between mattresses and tied them together in pairs to protect the instruments.His elder daughter Nelma carried his viola strapped onto her back.

                                                 __________________________

 

I gradually learnt enough to play the 2nd cornet part for hymn tunes. It took some time before I could join fully in playing more difficult music such as marches.

Let me quote from Marcy Ditmanson’s diary: Sept 28 (1943) “…..I’ve joined the Salvation Army band. It gives me something to do, and gives me good practice on my cornet. We practise on Tuesday evenings in the sewing room, and play three times a week at meetings or the open air….”

 

I well remember the cold winters, and how we cornet/trumpet players could not wear gloves as the valves were too close together. Our hands and lips were chapped but it did not occur to us to stop playing.

Let me turn again to Marcy’s diary, an entry on Feb 27th 1944; “…..I had pancakes today after a two-hour clothes wash. I mixed in my this week’s egg with yesterday’s bread porridge, and added some flour, baking powder and salt begged off  Gene (Huebener). It was quite a treat. Finished just in time for band-playing at 11.30. We played marches and hymn tunes for about an hour and a half, -outside the hospital, near the Italian camp, and in front of building 23. A lot of people turned out to hear us. Two new pieces are being written in camp for the band,- a march by Gene, and a selection by Major (sic) Stranks and Mrs Bazire….”

 

We now move on to July 4th, and a most fascinating entry in Marcy’s diary:

“We’ve celebrated the ‘Fourth’ with a full day’s program of athletic, religious and social events, with the whole community, regardless of nationality, either participating in or enjoying the goings-on. We had to have permission, of course, for the celeb(ration)……..We had a special church service at 11:45, well attended by both Am(ericans) and Brit(ish). The band played. Most of the selections we played,  (Am)erican) were instrumented in camp: “Star Spangled Banner”, “O Beautiful for Spacious Skies” “God Bless America”,…..The (base)ball game in the evening was between the Am(ericans) and the (Brit)ish). It was a closely fought game…..The band played from its march books in between innings. At the close of the game we played “God Bless Am(erica)” and “My Country, ‘tis of Thee”. All the spectators, numbering 5-6 hundred, I suppose, stood at attention as we played the latter piece. It was a most impressive moment. To the Br(itish), of course, we were playing their nat’l anthem; to the Americans one of the best- loved patriotic hymns……”

July 5th(1944): “There have been some repercussions from yesterday’s celebrations. The Jap(anese) objected to our playing ‘national anthems’. (Answer to the Japanese) “‘America’ is not a national anthem”. (Japanese) ‘Well then why did everybody stand at attention when it was being played?’ Stranks was warned by Schmidt (the Discipline man) on orders from the J. not to play any more patriotic airs….”

 

It has occurred to me : what did we use for valve oil then? Perhaps some members of the band had valve oil, but I think I spat on my valves for lubrication!

 

There is an entry in Sept 30th (1944) in Marcy’s diary which is interesting in itself, and which has a bearing on band practice:

“…..The scouting movement here has gotten into trouble thrice during the past week or two.

1 A cpl(couple) of boys were caught pacing out a certain area within the camp and drawing a map based on their findings. An order promptly came forbidding the sketching or painting of walls, bldgs or other structures along the main walls of the camp.

2 Chefoo boys ran afoul of the authorities a few days later because they had a campfire. The J(apanese) wanted to know where the logs came from. They could only see it as wasting precious fuel, and they threatened reprisals. So no more campfires.

3 Last night the rangers had their regular meeting in the Kindergarten room. Sergeant Pu Hsing Te (Marcy wrote the Chinese characters) somehow took offence to this and stopped the gathering, taking the leader, Miss Phare, down to the guardhouse. The upshot of it all was that the compound in which the campfires and meetings were held had been declared “out-of-bounds” after dark. In that compound are also the book-binding room, barber shop, shoe-shop, post office, electric power house and sewing room. Hereafter our band practices, which were held Monday nights in the sewing room, will be held elsewhere, probably in the church….The band too met with disfavor  Thursday night. It was playing just outside the church per custom to draw people to the evang. meeting inside. Serj. Pu Hsing Te came along, took Brig. Stranks down to the guard-house and reprimanded him for playing outside the church without permission. The band had perm. to play inside, but not outside! Serj. Pu Hsing Te is not very popular.”

“Oct 1. Sunday…..The band played outside the church again tonight, but were stopped by the J. We were told hereafter not to play after dark. It is all right to play inside tomorrow.”

 

Here is an interesting and amusing story kindly told me by the Rev Joe Cotterill, who will be 90 in March 2007.

“ Gene Huebener, who played the tenor horn in the band, had an interest in helping boys in Weihsien.One of his activities was to get boys to construct recorders in bamboo. So up to a dozen boys would gather in Gene’s dormitory, much to the annoyance of the other men who slept there, and be shown how to make recorders from sticks of bamboo, and then how to play them. It was the latter which annoyed  his fellow dormitory members! But the boys enjoyed it and profited from it.

“Unfortunately one of the boys later developed appendicitis, and a slither of bamboo was found in his appendix!”

 

We come to February 1945. It was a bitterly cold winter. On Feb 18th the band was playing outside the hospital where Eric Liddell, the Olympic runner, was lying seriously ill. He sent a request to the band to play one of his favourite hymns, “Be Still My Soul”, to the tune “Finlandia”. At the time we did not know that Eric would not have much longer to live. The memory of playing that day will live with me for ever. It was such a privilege, playing for our great hero, Eric.

 

We move on to the summer of 1945 and to that most glorious , most memorable of days: Aug 17th, when we were liberated by the American paratroopers. Again let Marcy speak:

“Aug 17,1945. Brigadier Stranks  got the band together and we lined up on an elevation overlooking the north wall (by the gate) and began playing national airs and marches. The band struck up “God Bless America” and the “Stars Spangled Banner”. About fifty Pao An Tui from Weihsien had arrived and were lined up outside the gate. The band played  “Sam Min Chu”, (the Nationalist national anthem), and the Chinese all stood at attention, cheering and clapping when we had finished.”

 

I well remember that occasion. I had hoped to go out through the gate to enjoy the freedom of being in the surrounding countryside, but someone (Doug?) had brought my trumpet along, so instead I enjoyed playing in the band. Later I joined in the activities outside the camp.

 

I should add that earlier that summer we began practising the national anthems of all the countries represented in the camp, but NOT the top line, so as not to arouse the suspicion of our guards. These tunes were arranged as a medley by a band member, and on Aug 17th, we of course played it with all the melodies.

 

 

Again, may I remind readers that excerpts from Marcy Ditmanson’s diaries have been used by permission from Mrs Joyce Ditmanson/Cotterill

 

A Footnote

 

After coming to England in Dec 1945, I hardly ever played the trumpet again, except on Christmas Days for a few years when I would play “Christians Awake, Salute the Happy Morn” first thing in the morning. If any of the family were asleep, they were soon wide awake!

In 2000 my three children  had my Weihsien trumpet restored for my 70th birthday. Later I joined the Bath Spa Training Band. I occasionally play 3rd cornet in the main Bath Spa Band in their lighter concerts. The violin is still my main instrument. I have played in the Bath Symphony Orchestra (amateur) for the last 43 years..

 

 

I hope to write a short article on the Weihsien  orchestra and on recitals later on.

 

Attached: (a) Photos of the SA Band in Weihsien

UPPER: (All standing) from left to right

Donald Littler, Adjutant Fred Buist, Marcy Ditmanson, James Dempster, Peter Bazire, Doug Sadler, Josh Clarke, Major Henry Collishaw, Gene Huebener, Steve Shaw, Norman Cliff, Major Ollie Wellbourn, Ian Sowton, Major Charles Sowton, Major Len Evenden, Brigadier Len Stranks.

LOWER: (1) Standing:

Steve Shaw, Donald Littler, Adj, Fred Buist, Doug Sadler, Josh Clarke, Peter Bazire, Marcy Ditmanson, James Dempster, Major Len Evenden.

                 (2) Crouching:

Major Ollie Wellbourn, Norman Cliff, Gene Huebener, Brig Len Stranks, Major Henry Collishaw, Ian Sowton, Major Charles Sowton.

 

(b) Peter Bazire, (Summer 2006) in Bath Spa Band uniform.

 

 

 

 

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: new chapter

Date: vendredi 16 février 2007 0:32

 

Hello,

New chapter on the paintings' web-site --- "From Peter Bazire"

--- text and photos ---

click on:

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org  --- and then on "Peter Bazire" in the left column and then click on whatever inspires you ---

---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: <grannydavies@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: The Salvation Army Band in Weihsien

Date: vendredi 16 février 2007 3:47

 

did notget message or pictures,  would love to have them  Phyllis EvansDavies

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: The Salvation Army Band in Weihsien

Date: vendredi 16 février 2007 10:06

 

Hello,

Click on this link: http://www.weihsien-paintings.org

then, click on "Peter Bazire" at the bottom left of your screen ---

click on the pictures --- to see them "bigger" ---

--- and click on the symbol representing a book --- and you will have the complete text ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Stan Thompson" <thompson@ginniff.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: "peter bazire" <psbazire@yahoo.co.uk>

Objet: The Weihsien Salvation Army Band

Date: vendredi 16 février 2007 20:56

 

 

Peter,

          Thanks for the Weihsien memories, and the stories about the Weihsien Salvation Army band.  Finlandia was seared into my memory as a child (perhaps especially at Eric Liddell's funeral) and the tune has stirred warm memories for me ever since.

        When I consider that, in retrospect, my most vivid  memory about the Salvation Army band is the characteristic way that Mr Buist sucked air in at the left side of his mouth, I realize what a complete musical moron I was then - and still am today !   This may have been genetic - (or possibly mimetic, a la Dawkins).  I remember no music at home in my childhood - only at church, and our children remember only a handful of 76 rpm records in the house - literally, less than 10, and even now,  our shelves have few CDs,  but thousands of books !  Our children have worked at repairing this defect in their up-bringing - with varying success !

                    All the best,

                                         Stan Thompson

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: portraits - Greg Leck's book

Date: samedi 17 février 2007 16:18

 

Dear Greg,

--- a new add to the gallery of portraits in your chapter ---

click on this link:

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/GregLeck/pages/p_portraits01.htm  

 

Best regards,

 

Leopold

 

 

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: bobbie backhouse

To: info@weihsien-paintings.org

Sent: Saturday, February 17, 2007 7:54 AM

 

 

   15a is  Sheila Livingston McNeil

 

De: <grannydavies@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: The Salvation Army Band in Weihsien

Date: dimanche 18 février 2007 4:02

 

Thanks for the pictures of the Salvation Army band. Many memories, Phyllis

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: portraits

Date: dimanche 18 février 2007 9:22

 

Dear Greg,

Just got this message from Albert on the Weihsien-paintings-web-site ---

I'm sending it on Topica --- hope that Joyce will be able to help :-))

click on:

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/GregLeck/pages/p_portraits01.htm  

Best regards,

Leopold

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Albert de Zutter

To: info@weihsien-paintings.org

Sent: Sunday, February 18, 2007 3:53 AM

Subject: portraits

 

 

Leopold,

 

I believe that portrait No. 22b is Yvonne, originally from Tsingtao. Joyce Cook Bradbury would know for sure, and would know her last name. I saw her with Joyce and Joyce's husband when they visited San Francisco from Australia about 10 years ago.

 

Albert de Zutter

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Stan Thompson

To: weihsien@topica.com

Cc: peter bazire

Sent: Monday, February 19, 2007 5:29 AM

Subject: note to Peter Bazire

 

PETER BAZIRE
Peter,
            Good to hear from you and get re-acquainted after 62 years !  Delores and I have been married for 54 years and we have spent 47 of them in Iowa City, and the last 40 of them living on a farm just 10 miles out of town – raising sheep for 36 of those years !. I came to Iowa in 1961 in the hope of getting a good training in ophthalmology. It seemed to work !   I took a special interest in the neurological side of visual troubles (“neuro-ophthalmology”), and ended up spending 30 years on the University of Iowa faculty (Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine) teaching this part of the specialty to would-be ophthalmologists. I have been retired now for almost 10 years. (google me at “H. Stanley Thompson” for the details.  I googled you and found out you were an oldsulian  - whatever that means !).
                All the best,
                                                            Stan Thompson
 
PS.   Jack Graham came to visit me and left me a clearer copy of that familiar picture of Chefoo Weihsieners getting off the train at Qingdao in 1945.   I will send it to Leopold – and if it really is clearer, perhaps he will put it up on his website and we can all have another go at naming the people in the picture.      
-   Stan

--^^---------------------------------------------------------------

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: portraits

Date: lundi 19 février 2007 18:28

 

Yes I thought it might be Ivonne Ozorio now Rozicki and when I see her I will show her that photo. Joyce.

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: portraits

Date: mardi 20 février 2007 14:57

 

 

Thank you very much --- I'll add that on the web-site --- and I also got 2 new identifications in my mail-box this morning :-))

Best regards,

Leopold

 

----- Original Message -----

From: bobbie backhouse

To: info@weihsien-paintings.org

Sent: Tuesday, February 20, 2007 7:52 AM

 

 

16a is Dennis  Carter

 

11a is  C.T. "Tommy  Hall

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Fw: portraits - Greg Leck's book

Date: mardi 20 février 2007 20:34

 

Leopold,

 

You're a genius!  You keep spreading joy around the globe.

 

Mary Previte

 

De: <smallchief@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Greetings from New Member

Date: mercredi 21 février 2007 16:12

 

Hello, all

 

I just joined the list and look forward to reading your posts.  As background, I was not an internee in World War II, but I got interested in the subject from reading Langdon Gilkey's book and "The Call" by John Hersey and reading and seeing "King Rat" and that Spielberg movie about an internee camp near Shanghai -- the name of which eludes me at the moment. 

 

I'll be ordering the more recent books written on internees and I would certainly welcome any recommendations from you -- especially oral histories of detainees. 

 

My background is international affairs and I recently retired after spending some 39 years wandering around the world on behalf of the government and humanitarian organizations.   

 

Thanks and I look forward to talking to all of you.

 

                               Smallchief

     

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Greetings from New Member

Date: jeudi 22 février 2007 13:26

 

Hello from Belgium,

Dear Smallchief,

You can click on this link:

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/books/Topica/BibliographyTopica.htm

--- When we were liberated by the Americans in August 1945, I was 4 years old --- and don't remember much about our captivity during WWII.

A few years ago, I discovered "The Internet" and wanted to know more about Weihsien and finally made a blog.

It's a labyrinth with a lot of interesting data --- extracts of books, books in English and French, documents, paintings, sketches --- etc. Hope you find your way and have a good time ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: <smallchief@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Greetings from New Member

Date: jeudi 22 février 2007 18:39

 

 

Hi, Leopold

 

I found your weihsien-paintings website a few days ago and have been reading some of the material on the site.  I really appreciate what  you've done -- and I'll read some of the books on the subject.   Four  or five years ago I looked on the web for information about Weihsien internees  and found very little. It's good to see there's a lot more information available now.  

 

A question:   You're familiar with Gilkey's book about  Weihsien.  He changed all the names in the book -- partially because his  comments about many people were not complimentary.  Have any of the former  internees gone through the book and tried to identify the people he  mentions?   

 

Thanks for everything.

 

                                                  Smallchief (Larry Thompson)

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Greetings from New Member

Date: vendredi 23 février 2007 10:36

 

Hi Larry!

Welcome aboard Weihsien@topica!

 

It is probably fifteen years since I read Langdon Gilkey's book, 'Shantung Compound' so I do not remember it in detail however I do recall some things in it. As you said, he tried to hide the identities of individuals in the camp by changing their names. However, I definitely recall one name he either forgot to change or simply did not think it mattered. That was the name of a highly-placed Japanese official named Watanabi. I clearly remember, after nearly 62 years, Mr Watanabi waving goodbye to us from a flat car on a railway siding as our train, loaded with just-released internees, pulled out of the railway station at Weihsien in September 1945 bound for Qingdao.  When I read Shantung Compound, I recall thinking that Gilkey had a 'double standard' in his writing, treating the internees differently than our guards.  Not a very big thing I suppose, but it didn't seem fair to me.

 

On another note, I believe Gilkey was about 24 yrs old at the end of the war. He was one of the cooks in Kitchen One at Weihsien. I don't recall any of the dishes he created but I do remember that I was always happy when he was on duty.  That must mean that he was more imaginative than some of our other more 'prosaic' cooks.  In their defense I'll say that none of the cooks had a great deal to work with.  But there was some real slop produced in that kitchen, more fit for swine than human beings. Gilkey somehow managed to do a better job then some.  His associate chef was a 'Miss Hinckley.'

 

Sincerely

 

David

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: vendredi 23 février 2007 12:14

 

Hello,

Father Hanquet worked in kitchen No.1 with Langdon Gilkey ---

Try this link --- it's in the "books" chapter:

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/books/Gilkey/txt_Suggested_Key.htm

best regards,

Leopold

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Donald Menzi

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, February 23, 2007 9:38 PM

Subject: Re: Fw: Greetings from New Member

 

Welcome, Larry,

 

As part of Weifang's celebration of the 60th anniversary of Weihsien's liberation, I prepared a "slide show" that includes a virtual "walking tour" or the camp, based on the paintings and drawings of over a dozen artists who were interned there.  It also includes a segment on the prisoner-exchange voyage of the Gripsholm, and the 2005 celebration.

 

If you will send me your mailing address, I would be glad to send you a copy of the CD.

The same goes for anyone else who would like a copy. 
The updated version includes appropriate musical accompaniments.

 

Donald Menzi

 

De: "Alison Holmes" <aholmes@prescott.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: vendredi 23 février 2007 21:52

 

I'd love one, Donald, and would gladly reimburse you.  My address is  PO Box 12451, Prescott, AZ 86304   Thanks so much, Alison Holmes

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Donald Menzi

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, February 23, 2007 10:31 PM

Subject: RE: Fw: Greetings from New Member

 

Alison,

 

There is no charge.  As with Leopold and the other "Weihsieners" the pleasure from being able to share this material with others who appreciate - not to mention the enjoyment of creating new ways to present it - it is more than enough compensation.

 

Donald

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 1:37

 

Donald~

We would love to have a CD and would be glad to pay for it.  You can find us at:

Dwight & Judy Whipple

4728A Lakeshore Lane S.E.

Olympia, WA 98513

360.456.4300

thewhipples@comcast.net

 

De: "Pamela Maters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Langdon Gilkey's AKA's

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 1:41

 

For anyone who's interested, I pulled up Landon Gilkey's page on weihsienpictures. org and glancing over his AKA List (also known as) I came up with some new identities, and a couple of changes (*).

 

Page 22 -- W.T. Roxby-Jones  =  Pierre Travers-Smith, RA. (Royal Academy) It takes a helluva great artist to get hung in the Royal Academy  in London, and the beautiful water color of the guard tower at sunset is his.

 

Page 23 -- Jacob Strauss  =  Teddy Nathan, General Manager and CEO of the Kailan Mining Administration (not company), better known as the KMA.  The name Kailan was derived from the Kaiping  and  Lanchow mines when they joined forces and became the huge Chinese/British coal mining consortium, one of Japan's prime targets for overrunning North China.

 

Page 25 -- Johns  =  Wilfred  Pryor, Asst. General Manager, KMA

Page 25 -- Jameson  =  "Rich" Richardson

 

Page 31 -- Chesterton  =  Bill Chilton, KMA Port Administrator, Chinwangtao, promoted to a top executive position in the Kailan when he out-bluffed the Japanese Imperial Army in North China. (See page 31, The Mushroom Years for details, it's worth a read)

    An interesting side-bar: Bill Chilton was actually a Texan who ran away to sea and joined the Royal Navy, retiring with the rank of commander. He was not short, as Gilkey has him, but tall and lean, with the sad face of a bloodhound. And yes, he spoke very, very slowly and distinctly.

 

page 57* -- Doctor Kailon (sp?) = Grice. That should read "Kailan Chief-of-Staff" = Dr. Grice

 

Page 121* Ian Campbell  = Ted McLaren

 

Have a great day -- Pamela

 

Pamela Masters - Author/Publisher

Henderson House Publishing

Titles: The Mushroom Years, Sass & Serendipity

Phone: 530-647-2000

Fax: 530-647-2002

pamela@hendersonhouse.com

http://www.hendersonhouse.com

 

De: "Alison Holmes" <aholmes@prescott.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 2:05

 

Thank you so much!  And may your rewards come long before heaven!

Alison

 

 

 

De: "Alison Holmes" <aholmes@prescott.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Langdon Gilkey's AKA's

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 2:05

 

You are just a marvel, Pamela!  What a fund of information and delight you are.  Never over the top, just fascinating and factual and putting the emphasis on the material...I just wanted you to know how much I appreciate your tone.  Alison Martin Holmes

 

 

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 2:34

 

Donald -- I'm a lurker on this listserv -- actually an interloper from the Chaipei camp in Shanghai (12 at the time) -- but I have a continuing interest in anything related to the 1943 Gripsholm voyage that I was on with my family and the Scovel family from Weihsien.

 

So if your offer extends this far, it would be very welcome. Let me know of any disk or postage costs you'd like in advance or after. I stumbled onto this listserv, and hope some traffic will begin on the listserv Greg Leck just started for Chapei & all the Asia camps.

 

One of my long-term ambitions, which I poke into every few years, is to persuade the family of the late Carl Mydans (the LIFE photographer who was an internee and on the Gripsholm, and managed to wangle a camera at the Goa exchange point) to search out the negatives of that Gripsholm voyage and make the entire set available on line or CD. I've met son Seth Mydans, and he said any negatives would be among his effects, but it might be quite a long time before anyone got into that stuff.

 

Regards,

            Ted Stannard (R.E.Stannard Jr.)

            4328 Frances Ave

            Bellingham, WA 98226-8735

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 5:49

 

 

Ted,

 

I'll be happy to send it to you, but no charge, please.

 

I have included some of the photos from Life magazine in the "Gripsholm" portion.  You probably already have the Life edition that covered the stopover in Goa.  If not, I'd be happy to scan and send it to you.

 

Donald

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 7:16

 

Much Thanks! Yes, I have that LIFE -- saw it listed second hand a few months ago and couldn't resist sending for it. (Cost like a new book!) But I'm confident Carl Mydans shot many rolls of 35mm film, so there could be a lot of photos people would like to see and identify for historical purposes.

 

Ted

 

De: "Ron Bridge" <rwbridge@freeuk.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 11:22

 

Donald,

When you scan them and send could you add my address rwbridge@freeuk.com

Many thanks

Ron Bridge

onetime Blk42 rm 6 and Blk13Rm 12 after the internee exchange

 

De: "Eddie Cooke" <shedco@optusnet.com.au>

À: "Weihsien@Topica.Com" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Mailing List

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 13:19

 

 I have not received mail from Weihsien@topica for some time. Can anyone explain why?  I have now re-subscribed and looking forward to latest news.

Eddie Cooke

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Langdon Gilkey's AKA's

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 14:24

 

Dear Pamela,

Thanks very much for the adds and corrections ---

Could you check? I also added a link to Pierre Travers-Smith's painting ---

Best regards,

Leopold

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org

go to "books" and click on "Weihsien"

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Langdon Gilkey's AKA's

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 19:32

 

Thanks Pamela, this is the most interesting e-mail to hit my screen in a long time!

Take care,

Zandy

 

De: "Pamela Maters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Langdon Gilkey's AKA's

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 20:15

 

Leopold, there's no doubt about it...you're very special!

 

Thank you so much for all your entries, especially listing The Mushroom Years under Weihsien's books, and then putting in such neat links

.

I sure admire people who can waltz around the Internet and get it to come alive with hardly any effort.

 

And thank you also for adding the additional names to the Gilkey/Hubbard AKA List. I wonder if Langdon would have been so rough on "Chesterton" if he'd known he was actually a Texan!?!

 

Have a good one -- Pamela

 

Pamela Masters - Author/Publisher

Henderson House Publishing

Titles: The Mushroom Years, Sass & Serendipity

Phone: 530-647-2000

Fax: 530-647-2002

pamela@hendersonhouse.com

http://www.hendersonhouse.com

 

De: "Tracy Strong" <tstrong@weber.ucsd.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re Gripsholm trip

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 22:08

 

Dear Donald --

Might I ask if you might also send me a copy of this scan --if this was the second Gripsholm trip I was a babe in arms (well, in a basket).  I doubt the picture will prompt any memories (1) but it would be nice to see it.

 

Many thanks.

 

Tracy

 

Tracy B. Strong

 

De: "Tracy Strong" <tstrong@weber.ucsd.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Langdon Gilkey's AKA's

Date: samedi 24 février 2007 22:09

 

I cannot seem to pull up weihsienpictures.org (as below) - what mistake am I

making?

 

 

 

Tracy B. Strong

 

De: "Pamela Maters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Langdon Gilkey's AKA's

Date: dimanche 25 février 2007 2:16

 

Sorry, you didn't make a mistake, I did. That should read www.weihsien-paintings.org  Note: it also has a dash in it. Once again, Tracy, I apologize -- Pamela

 

Pamela Masters –

 

De: "Pamela Maters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: My AKA???

Date: dimanche 25 février 2007 2:38

 

I am still trying to figure how my last posting had me listed as Pamela "Maters." Please be advised that is not one of my AKAs.  The only other name I ever answered to was Bobby Simmons, and that was over sixty years ago!

 

Regarding Greg's photos: I've just checked them over, and I believe 10e is Sharon Talati, a gifted pianist who put on several terrific concerts for us in camp. 10f could be her mother, Mrs. Talati. She and her husband owned Talati House Hotel in Tientsin. Maybe Des Power could verify this. -- Pamela Masters

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Langdon Gilkey's AKA's

Date: dimanche 25 février 2007 3:05

 

Thank you, Pamela! You've made a very valuable contribution!

David

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: My AKA???

Date: dimanche 25 février 2007 3:06

 

Pamela!

You are really enriching our memories! I well recall Miss Talati practising the piano!  She was one of the few people in camp who were privileged to play the few pianos there. She used to spend hours on end doing her scales, chords and arpeggios - I think on the piano at the camp church!

 

I was so conscious of her privilege because at the age of nearly eleven, when the Chefoo folk (including me) were interned at Temple Hill, I lost the privilege of having piano lessons and doing piano practise - there just weren't enough pianos after we left our school compound. So I ended up teaching myself how to play, in Canada, when my dad bought me a piano. I was sixteen!

 

David

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: My AKA???

Date: dimanche 25 février 2007 3:20

 

> Pamela Maters <pamela@hendersonhouse.com> wrote:       I am still trying to

> figure how my last posting had  me listed as Pamela "Maters."

 

Pamela, it appears that somewhere in setting up your system you dropped the first "s" in Masters and so all your emails are faithfully carrying that version in front of your email address. Somewhere in your mail program....

Cyberspace does the darndest things!

               Ted Stannard

 

 

De: "Pamela Maters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: My AKA???

Date: lundi 26 février 2007 3:44

 

Hey, that's wild! I went back to my Weihsien file just to check, and ALL my postings show my correct name ahead of my e-mail address!?!

Pamela Masters

 

De: "Pamela Maters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: My AKA???

Date: lundi 26 février 2007 5:03

 

And if I recall correctly, David, that lovely old piano in the Assembly Hall was a Steinway. What a lovely plug for such a venerable name in pianos!

Pamela

 

De: "Pamela Maters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: My AKA???

Date: lundi 26 février 2007 7:53

 

Ah, the mystery of my misspelled name is solved! Obviously, when I signed up for Weihsien Topica, I must've entered it wrong. I just got my last posting back, on this very subject, and there is was. I hate like heck going back into Weihsien Topica, as I've been dropped me so many times, and  had to re-sign up so many times, I shudder to think what would happen if I did it again...

Pamela Masters

 

Pamela Masters -

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: My AKA???

Date: lundi 26 février 2007 14:39

 

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/pander/Weifang2006/Slide_Show/02_Weihsien/p_01.htm

click on the link and scroll down to picture a13 and a14 ---

--- is this the piano?

When I visited Weihsien last year in January I was shown this piano in one of the Japs' houses now a museum.

 

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Pamela Maters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: My AKA???

Date: lundi 26 février 2007 19:44

 

Hello, Leopold --

If memory serves me, the piano in the Assembly Hall was a Steinway concert grand, not an upright, like the one you photographed. I do believe that was the one that a Mr. Grimes, also a musician and piano player, used to play. It was housed in one of the administration buildings. I have to admit, memory is hazy on this -- Pamela

 

De: "Gay Talbot Stratford" <stillbrk@eagle.ca>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: My AKA???

Date: lundi 26 février 2007 21:52

 

Good morning Leopold,

You are a wonderful lynch pin for us all. Thank you so much.

I remember that at aged twelve , I was honoured to be able to play the piano at a concert It was a thrill; however, I do not know how great the performance was, since I was only able to practice on it twice beforehand.

Greetings to you both,

Gay Talbot Stratford

 

De: "Sonya Grypma" <sonya.grypma@uleth.ca>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Interned nurses

Date: lundi 26 février 2007 22:20

 

Hi everyone,

 

My name is Sonya Grypma & I am a nurse historian with a special interest in missionary nursing in China.  I've written a book to be published by UBC Press in Fall 2007 called "Healing Henan:  Canadian nurses at the North China Mission, 1888 - 1947."  I am currently working on a project about the internment experiences of Canadian nurses in China (mostly Weihsien & Pudong). 

 

I hope you don't mind me joining your web group here - I've found it so helpful to better understand what Weihsien was all about. Thanks, too, to all of you who have worked on the Weihsien website - I've found it very interesting!

 

I visited Weifang last October with three Canadian "missionary kids" (now in their 70s and 80s) whose family or friends were interned there (Eric Liddell’s wife Florence MacKenzie was a Canadian nurse, and also a “missionary kid” with the United Church North China Mission in Henan, and later Tianjin, where she met Eric).

 

From what I can gather, there were up to five Canadian nurses interned in China. I know that Elizabeth (Thomson) Gale was under house arrest at Jinan before being sent with her husband Godfrey (LMS) & daughter Margaret to Shanghai (eventually Pudong).  Also, Susie Kelsey (Anglican nurse) was sent to Weishien after a few months of house arrest in Henan (Honan), and was part of the repatriation on the Gripsholm.  I suspected that Mary (Boyd) Stanley was interned at Weifang with her husband Charles and their son, but that was only confirmed in October when I searched the engraved wall at the Weihsien site.

 

In addition, it is possible that Georgina (Menzies) Lewis, married to Dr. John Lewis of the Baptist Missionary Society, was interned with their child/ children, but I have found no evidence of that.  It is also possible that Jean (Menzies) Stockley (English Baptist mission) was interned with their children, but this seems less likely.

 

Do any of you know about any of these women?  In particular, Susie Kelsy, RN or Mrs. Mary Stanley (Block 15, I think)?

 

As you know, the hospital is still standing at Weifang. I am also very interested in knowing more about how the hospital was organized.  Susie Kelsey was repatriated on the Gripsholm, and I remember her writing that she was a bit concerned about what would happen to health care after she left since a number of doctors and nurses were leaving at the same time.

 

Very sincerely,

Sonya

 

De: "John Stanley" <stanley@kutztown.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Interned nurses

Date: lundi 26 février 2007 22:40

 

Weihsien list members:

 

I have recently signed up for the listserve and have found it very interesting to hear about the experiences and activities of those in the Camp.

 

Although I was not in the camp (I am too young), my father, grandfather and grandmother were there from 1943-1945. For my dissertation I looked at the history of the camp as the American Presbyterian mission station between 1883 and 1920.

 

I hope to hear more about the recorded experiences of the list members.

 

John Stanley

(grandson of "John" and Mary Stanley and son of Charles)

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: My AKA???

Date: mardi 27 février 2007 4:43

 

I would have to agree with Pamela!  The piano in the Assembly Hall/Church was a grand, a really big piano!  I know there were several other pianos in the camp. I believe Block 22 had one.

 

David

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Interned nurses

Date: mardi 27 février 2007 9:17

 

Hi  Sonya,

I couldn't help noticing your interesting e-mail and admiring  your dedication to the task ahead.

You are quite right,

The Weishien Camp listing does show a Mrs. M.B. Stanley (Canadian) living in Block 15.

This is how the listing appears:

15/12   Stanley, C.J.                              American     30     M

Student

   "        Stanley, Mrs. M.B. (Canadian)       "              30     F

Housewife

   "        Stanley, C.A.                                 "               2

M   Child

Even though I was 14 at the time, and situated in Block 22 ( which was located along side Block 15, end to end) andhad friends living midway along that block, I can't recall  that particular family, though.

With a bit of luck though, someone else who lived in that block may remember the lady.  Alison maybe?

Sorry I couldn't find Susie Kelsey listed as such, for you.

Regards,

A. (Zandy) Strangman

 

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: My AKA???

Date: mardi 27 février 2007 9:44

 

Sorry David,

I don't think a piano of any shape or form could have been squeezed into any of those rooms in OUR Block 22.

Earlier in our stay, I had the lone of a piano accordion for 2 weeks BUT I didn't think it had been that ‘noticeable’!

I shouldn't have got carried away with  'Roll Out the Barrel', like I did!  That must've given the game away !

Cheers,  Zandy

 

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Interned nurses

Date: mardi 27 février 2007 11:50

 

Hello,

I'm Zandy's neighbour from block-22

Try this link:

( maybe you have already found it in Ron Bridge's chapter on

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org  )

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/RonBridge/habitants/weihsien02.xls

It's a "exell" file of about 400KB --- too big to send via "Topica". It's a complete listing of all the ex-internees at Weihsien during our captivity.

Hope this helps

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Interned nurses

Date: mardi 27 février 2007 17:11

 

Zandy,

 

The Stanleys you list are the parents and grandparent of one of our new members, John Stanley.  M. B. Stanley was the former Mary Boyd - noted for her beauty in my grandfather George Wilder's letters.  I don't know if she was a nurse.

 

They are the ones referred to in John's February 26 email.

 

Donald

 

De: "Sonya Grypma" <sonya.grypma@uleth.ca>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Interned nurses

Date: mardi 27 février 2007 18:50

 

WOW - Thanks to all of you who have written here & who have also contacted me directly in the past 24 hours (!!).  I cannot tell you all how exciting it is for me to finally get in touch with people who remember Mary and her family. I have been searching dead ends for about 5 years. Thank you all for your suggestions & leads - I will follow up on each of them.

 

John, it is such a pleasure to have contact with you.  I had lost hope of meeting up with anyone related to the Boyd/Stanley family. I do have a fairly good understanding of the mission that Mary grew up in, but not of her life after she married. You might be interested to know that I have a couple of photos of Mary that will be included in my book - one group photo that includes Mary, her sister Dorothy, and the young Florence MacKenzie, as well as the wedding photo of Mary and Charles ("John", right?).  She was gorgeous all right!

 

Mary was one of 7 "missionary kids" from the United Church North China Mission (Honan/ Henan) who took their nurses training in Canada and then returned to China as missionaries in their own right.  Six of these married China missionaries and remained in China, including Mary. 

 

I would love to read your dissertation, John:  Is there a way I can get a hold of it?  Because of the way the missions worked, it is difficult to follow the tracks of the nurses once they married.  For that reason, I lost "track" of your grandmother after she married your grandfather.  I would love to know more about her life after her marriage, and especially between 1941 and ~1946/47.

 

For John and anyone who might have any information/ documents about Mary that you are willing to share, feel free to contact me directly at sonya.grypma@uleth.ca   (for example, Donald, I would be very interested to read the letters written by your grandfather).

 

With my sincerest thanks,

Sonya

 

Sonya Grypma, RN, PhD

University of British Columbia & University of Lethbridge, Canada

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: mardi 27 février 2007 18:52

 

 

Sure, Ron,

 

Would anyone else like a copy of the Life magazine pictures and story about the Gripsholm transfer in Goa?  I'll also include the NY Times story about the arrival in NYC.

 

Don

 

 

De: "Brian Butcher" <bdbutcher@telus.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Greetings from New Member

Date: mardi 27 février 2007 20:17

 

Hello Don,

 

I would like a copy please. Our family did not leave on the  Gripsholm. Instead we were evacuated to Hong Kong from Tringtao on an  American naval vessel. After spending a short time there we were  taken on a liner to England. I was six years old at the time and some  of the memories are very vivid. I would appreciate hearing from  others who took the same trip as our family. I am in the process of  writing about these experiences (for my grandchildren) and would  appreciate any information about this. We came to Canada in 1954 and  I would especially like to hear from folks in this country.

 

Brian Butcher

 

bdbutcher@telus.net

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Greetings from New Member

Date: mardi 27 février 2007 21:25

 

Hey Brian!

I remember you as a little boy in Weihsien camp. If you were six at the end of the war, you are about seven years younger than I.  I think you parents were missionaries with the Salvation Army at the time, were they not?  I recall your dad giving his testimony at a service in the camp (in Block 24 I think). It was a gripping story that even today, over 60 years later, I will never forget. He was a wonderful man - you have a rich heritage!

 

I'll continue in a personal email rather than on Topica. But first I'll say that I am Canadian and live in New Westminster.

 

David

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: mercredi 28 février 2007 0:36

 

Don,

Would love to have the pictures and articles.

~Dwight W. Whipple

4728A Lakeshore Lane S.E.

Olympia, WA 98513

360.456.4300

thewhipples@comcast.net

 

De: "georgeanna knisely" <jknisely@paonline.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: mercredi 28 février 2007 5:54

 

Yes, please.  I was not on it, but knew people who were.  Thanks so much for this catchup.  Georgie Reinbrect Knisely

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: mercredi 28 février 2007 7:59

 

Don, actually, I'd be happy to get both, even though I already have the LIFEmagazine, as it would be nice to have them in digital form to share with siblings.

 

I may actually be in that NYTimes story, though not by name. Half a century ago, as a grad student working in the Cornel U library, recalling that I had been interviewed ships-side on Gripsholm arrival a dozen years earlier, by some reporter, I decided to look up the microfilm for that day just in case it had gotten in.

 

It turned out I DID find the NYT story, and deep on an inside page found an interview with an unnamed boy about his experiences. I recognized things I had told him about biking in China, and I was amused to discover he'd gotten things mixed up and wrong. Wonderful! I had achieved the distinction of being misquoted in the NYTimes at age 12!!!!!

 

If it is the same story in its entirety, it would be a particularly welcome keepsake!

 

Thanks,   Ted Stannard ChapeiCamp/Gripsholm 1943Mar-Dec

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: LIFE & NYTimes Gripsholm stories on CD

Date: mercredi 28 février 2007 8:40

 

Don -- I believe I forgot to provide a postal address. See the signature box below.  Ted Stannard

 

 

______________________________________________________________________

R.E.Stannard Jr. (Ted)               &               Femmy T. Stannard

e-mail : restannardjr@yahoo.com                femmystannard@yahoo.com

backup : stannard@cc.wwu.edu                   phone: (360) 392-0712

postal : 4328 Frances Avenue, Bellingham, WA98226-8735, USA         

Western Washington U. prof.emeritus; American University in Cairo ret.

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: mercredi 28 février 2007 8:57

 

> Yes :-)) I'd like to have a copy --- thanks in advance ---

> Best regards,

> Leopold

> 

De: "Ron Bridge" <rwbridge@freeuk.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Interned nurses

Date: mercredi 28 février 2007 14:27

 

I am in direct contact with Sonya as she has queries re people in other camps.

Ron

PS the Stanley's were friends and young Charlie and my brother Roger( Same age) were the two that found a Japanese pistol and were found trying to shoot each other.

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: More on the Gripsholm

Date: mercredi 28 février 2007 18:12

 

 

Those of you with an interest in the Gripsholm may also want to visit the web site I set up to distribute materials to Wilder and Stanley family members.

 

http://wilder.menzi.org .

 

Once on the site, go to "Directory", then to "4.b Repatriation Journey." where you will find Gertrude Wilder's paintings of ports visited by the Gripsholm on the way back.  The links to documents listed on that page aren't working, but you can download descriptions of the trip by going to "4.c Documents to Download" and scrolling down to "1943....."  Unfortunately, you may find that when these were copied from Word Perfect, the punctuation formats didn't translate well, so you'll have to interpret some characters as ", ' :,  etc.

 

I'd be interested in your feedback on these pictures and documents.

 

Donald

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Fw: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: mercredi 28 février 2007 19:11

 

 

TO:  All those I promised to send the Life Magazine story

 

For some inexplicable reason, I am temporarily unable to locate the "safe place" where I stored my copy of Life with the Gripsholm photos.  I've ordered another copy, which should be here in a few days, so there will be a slight delay.

 

By the way, would one of you who has a copy please check the date for me to make sure that I'm getting the correct one?  The photos were from their time in Goa, which was October 1943, but the issue that lists a photo-essay about the Gripsholm is December 22, after they had already landed in New York.

 

In the mean time, I am attaching my grandmother's humorous description of conditions on board the Teia Maru, which took them from Shanghai to Goa.  I think it's small enough that Topica will let it through.  (They limit attachments to 100k.)

 

Donald

 

ON THE GOOD SHIP TEIA MARU –

A SATIRE

 

By Gertrude S. Wilder

 

            ON THE GOOD SHIP TEIA MARU: A SATIRE

 

Have you only $2 million to spend on your vacation trip?  You can spend it all on the beautiful M.S. Teia Maru (formerly the Aramis)!

 

Let us help you plan your holiday.  Why spend your days on an ordinary ship when you can spend four weeks on the Teia?  Sail up the glorious Whangpu to Shanghai. See beautiful Hong Kong.  Visit lovely San Fernando, pearl of the Orient.  Steam up the Mekong to Saigon. See Singapore in the distance!

 

Why spend tedious hours sightseeing when you can sit in sulky boredom on such a floating palace, where the use of a deck chair costs but $100 and your friends are all around you - and on you?

 

Have you never had a chance to meet the best people?  Bible-thumping missionaries that you never knew existed; shake a murderer’s hand; call the jail birds by their first names, and remember all the mugs you see are not mugs B some are priests.

 

See the movie you saw 15 years ago, if you are able to get near it.  On the Teia it will seem new to you.  Spend entrancing hours absorbing the Japanese propaganda so thoughtfully provided.  Take long hours away on the line for soda pop B you won’t need to spend your money, as it will all be sold out before you get to the window.  Stifle in the airy, spacious second-class dining salon, playing bridge in boiler-room temperature.  Or one can have a cup of so-called coffee and a minute piece of cake for a mere $15 B no, not for the whole party, but $15 each!  Where do you think you are, at the Ritz?  Keep up your fighting spirit and get your deck chairs early!

 

You won’t miss your boozy atmosphere, as your bed mates smell like a brewery.  Are you afraid to sleep in the dark?  There is no need to be, as 60 watt lights will shine in your eyes all night long on this grand ship Teia.

 

Are you sleepless?  Try the luxurious coffin-sized mattress, stuffed with wooden clothes-pegs as a bed on the hardest ball-room floor afloat.   No blankets needed -- the other 250 bed-fellows will keep you warm.

 

Don’t worry about clothes for the cruise - on the Teia it’s smart to be shabby.  Have you worried about packing on other ship lines?  Travel by N.Y.K and avoid it all.  You’ll never unpack a thing on the Teia - there won’t be enough space!  To the sophisticated traveler washing and ironing present no problem whatever aboard this luxury liner.  Just throw your things overboard.  Think of how glad the fish will be to chew your rags!

 

Have you ever been thirsty?  Don’t risk it.  To ask for a second glass of water elicits nothing but a steward’s vacant stare.  Can’t read the signs?  Don’t let an ignorance of French handicap you.  The smell will guide you to where you want to go!

 

Rise with the lark, get ahead of the nuns and wash in a teaspoon of cold water in a basin with no stopper.  Try our Japanese style bath once after the crew members have finished with theirs.  Salt water, free of charge, provided for your teeth - both natural and false.

 

Do you want to reduce?  Are you ashamed of that ugly rubber-tire bulge of your waist line?  Rise from the table feeling that you could repeat the meal.  Do not eat between meals B it can’t be done unless the boy first gets his $100 B from you.  Does the sight of fruit in various ports make your mouth water?  Forget about it - it is not for you.  The Japanese police will chase the fruit boats away, and throw the fruit into the water in true co-prosperity fashion.

 

Try cold rice curry for a midnight snack - no spoons, just use your fingers or the handle of your tooth brush.  The 60 watt lights will enable you to snare the dehydrated worms in the nick of time.

 

Don’t worry about the correct tips - the boy will be sure to tell you how much he wants.  No steward can get a job on the N.Y.K. luxury liners unless he has served an apprenticeship of ten years with Ali Baba and his forty thieves.  Have you paid a $10 cover charge and got no cover?  You will on the Teia Maru!

 

On other lines you have never had occasion to use a life belt.  On the Teia it is not so.  You use it daily for a pillow and have it handy in case of ship wreck.  Not less than ten other people will want the one you have, so be smart and get yours early.

 

Book early on this luxury liner, the gem of the N.Y.K. fleet. Travel exclusively by her and you will never have a moment’s comfort from the internment camp ‘till you leave the ship.  And remember the Teia motto – “Nothing could be worse than this!”

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Fw: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: mercredi 28 février 2007 20:03

 

Donald~

The correct date of the Life Magazine in question is December 20, 1943 [10cents]!

~Dwight

 

4728A Lakeshore Lane S.E.

Olympia, WA 98513

360.456.4300

thewhipples@comcast.net

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: LIFE & NYTimes Gripsholm stories on CD

Date: mercredi 28 février 2007 20:49

 

Hi Ted~

Couldn't help but notice your Bellingham address.  We live in Oympia but both of us used to live in Bellingham--forty years ago.  Would be nice to see you.

~Dwight W. Whipple

 

4728A Lakeshore Lane S.E.

Olympia, WA 98513

360.456.4300

thewhipples@comcast.net

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Donald Menzi

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 9:06 PM

Subject: Re: Fw: Fw: Greetings from New Member

 



Thanks, Dwight,

 

When I get my replacement copy of Life, I will scan it and send it to Leopold along with copies of the New York Times articles chronicling the Gripsholm's journey. 

 

By the way, it's very nice to have new people join this group, making it an ever-widening circle with a common interest, however tangential.

 

Donald

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: My AKA???

Date: jeudi 1 mars 2007 3:32

 

Thank you, Pamela, for sharing your recollection.  I did not realize that the piano was a Steinway, the Prince of Pianos, Wow!!!  But I do remember listening to it being played many times. Do you remember Mr Percy Gleed? He was an outstanding pianist and often accompanied Sunday services. Miss Talati spent countless hours making the piano speak eloquently and sing impressively!

 

I also remember Mr Elden Whipple Sr, Dwight's father playing that piano just before so many of the Americans were repatriated!

 

Wonderful memories!  I hope the piano received a good home after the war. A Steinway should last for generations if it is well maintained!

 

David

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: My AKA???

Date: jeudi 1 mars 2007 3:54

 

Thanks, David, for mentioning Percy Gleed. I certainly remembered him, but I couldn't recall his name.

Isn't it lovely how time always smoothes out the rough spots in our lives ?

Pamela

 

Pamela Masters –

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: LIFE & NYTimes Gripsholm stories on CD

Date: jeudi 1 mars 2007 4:32

 

We moved here from New York (and the United NAtions) in 1969 -- just a few

years after you left. Yes, let's work out a rendezvous some time. Ted

 

--- "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net> wrote:

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Gripsholm Articles

Date: jeudi 1 mars 2007 5:59

 

 

I tried emailing some NY Times articles about the Gripsholm, but they were over Topica's size limit.

 

I'll 'll have to send them to Leopold and he will put the on the web site to be downloaded.

 

Donald

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: The Gripsholm in the New York Times

Date: vendredi 2 mars 2007 5:20

 

 

Hello, all,

 

I just emailed Leopold about two dozen articles about the Gripsholm that appeared in the New York Times from Sept. through Dec. 1943.  He will post them somewhere in the Weihsien labyrinth and let us all know where to find and download them.

 

Donald

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: portraits

Date: vendredi 2 mars 2007 10:56

 

Dear WeiHsieners

As you can see from the email from Ivonne Ozorio (Now Rozicki) she has looked at her photo No. 22b and here is her response. I think it is her! Joyce Bradbury

----- Original Message -----

From: Tony Rozicki

To: Bob Bradbury

Sent: Friday, March 02, 2007 2:22 PM

Subject: Re: portraits

 

 

Hi! Bob/Joyce,

 

I finally figured out how to find the famous photos.  With the help of Nathan,my grandson.

The one of me or supposed to be me, I am not sure because I dont remember what I looked like.

The more I look at that photo, the  more I think that Albert is right,  As far as the other photos are

concerned, I recognised Dennis Carter and The Tchoos, also Marinellis, the two sisters.  Gay Talbot

I remember her.  I know Joyce would know many more.

 

Sorry took so long.  Thanks again.

 

Ivonne

  ----- Original Message -----

  From: Bob Bradbury

  To: Tony Rozicki

  Sent: Tuesday, February 20, 2007 11:33 AM

  Subject: Fw: portraits

 

 

  Dear Yvonne. There is a photograph that looks very much like you amongst some taken about the time of the liberation, Have a look at it and let me know. The photo can be found at  http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/GregLeck/pages/p_portraits01 photo No. 22b.  If you can identify anybody else amongst the photos let me know. Joyce.

 

De: "J. EDWARD IMMERGLUCK" <IMMER0808@MSN.COM>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Copies of Life mag pictures and articles re Gripsholm

Date: dimanche 4 mars 2007 4:59

 

Thanks for your generosity, Don.  I too would enjoy and appreciate receiving those articles and pictures. 

Sincerely,

Ed Immergluck immer0808@msn.com<mailto:immer0808@msn.com>

Co-organizer of 2006 OCH Portland (OR) OCH Reunion

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Donald Menzi

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, March 04, 2007 7:04 AM

Subject: Re: Copies of Life mag pictures and articles re Gripsholm

 

 

Many of you have indicated an interest in the Life magazine photo essay about the Gripsholm.  I have now scanned them all and sent them to Leopold Pander who will be creating a page for them along with the series of New York Times articles on the Gripsholm that I sent him last week.  I think that this will satisfy most people's needs.  If not, I am open to sending them on a CD to each of you separately, but I would guess that the Weihsien web site will work well enough for most of us.

In the mean time, if you want to read all of the New York Times articles, tracking the Gripsholm as it went from Shanghai to New York, try clicking on the following link to the Gripsholm page in my section of the Weihsien web site:

 

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/DonMenzi/indexFrame.htm

 

After you get there you can click on the thumbnail on the left margin to see the complete text of each article. Many of them are just brief notices, but the series shows how people all over the world were following the progress of the "mercy ship." 

 

 Leopold says this is a new format, so let him know how well it works for you.  He will be setting up something similar for the Life photos.

 

Once again, this has proved that the web site has really become an invaluable archive for all of us. 

 

Thank you again, Leopold.

 

Donald

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Copies of Life mag pictures and articles re Gripsholm

Date: dimanche 4 mars 2007 8:28

 

Thanks, Don, for the stunning pictures and articles of the repatriation voyage.  I remember it well as a seven year old.  It was a great adventure then and a lot of memories are being stirred.

~Dwight W. Whipple

 

4728A Lakeshore Lane S.E.

Olympia, WA 98513

360.456.4300

thewhipples@comcast.net

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Copies of Life mag pictures and articles re Gripsholm

Date: dimanche 4 mars 2007 10:48

 

Don -- much thanks for getting the set posted. Everything was readable except the inside page on the New York arrival, which I'm especially interested in.

Could the individual clips on that inside page be posted separately, or is there away to "zoom in" that I haven't figured out?

   By the way, while on the Gripsholm trip I ran with a little "Gang of Five" about my age(12) -- Carl Scovel, Charlie Loucks, Johnny Hayes, David Phillipi (I'm not certain of that last spelling), and myself. Carl is the only one I ever saw again, and we have remained in regular touch ever since renewing acquaintance at Shanghai American School after WWII.

   Does anyone on this list have any knowledge of the other three boys? I'd be very interested in hearing anything about them -- then or now. Charlie's father had been physician with a noted exhibition that gathered dinosauer eggs & bones in West China, I believe. At 12 some adult activities are blurry.

   Our little gang turned entrepreneurial on the Gripsholm leg of the trip, setting up a shoe-shine business. Unfortunately we lost a pair or two along the way, and paying for them consumed whatever profit we might have made. Anyone recall anything like that?

   On the Teia Maru I remember the Japanese broke out a case or two of the English-language propaganda books they had aboard for the returning Japanese from America. One called "Singapore Assignment" was among them. I'm afraid the guards were not too happy when we kids tore out pages to make paper airplanes and sail them off the aft of the ship.

   I also remember we explored down into the bowels of the Teia Maru and found the darkened, spooky (and empty) swimming pool -- once an elegant place for a dip, I understand.  

   My family did experience one remarkable coincidence on the TM: my mother and the two youngest siblings were assigned to a cabin right next to one we had occupied returning from a 1936 furlough in America, when it was still the French luxury liner Aramis.  

   Although my father and I had been assigned with the rest of the men & older boys to the wooden shelves in the hold, we were able to squeeze all five of us into the cabin together by having the two youngest double up in a bunk and my father sleeping on the floor between bunks. 

      Ted Stannard (chapei/gripsholm mar-sec1943)

 

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Copies of Life mag pictures and articles re Gripsholm

Date: dimanche 4 mars 2007 12:20

 

Dear Ted,

On the right of the picture representing the New York arrival, there is a symbol representing an open book with the pages moving as if you were reading the story ---- click on that symbol --- and you will be able to read the whole text that I asked my computer to re-copy for me.

If ever that doesn't work, I added the text as "attachment" to this mail ---

Let me know if this works OK for you?

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Copies of Life mag pictures and articles re Gripsholm

Date: dimanche 4 mars 2007 13:50

 

I remember the Shanghai American School. I was in the kindergarten ---. It was just two blocks away from where we lived --- the Picardie Building. Before we arrived in the school, there was a garden with a jungle-Jim.

Must have been in 1948-49 before we left on board the s/s President Cleveland for San Francisco ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Copies of Life mag pictures and articles re Gripsholm

Date: dimanche 4 mars 2007 19:34

 

Ted,

 

I'll re-send the New York pages so they can be read better.  The first ones I sent were just the way they downloaded from the NY Times.

 

Don

 

De: "Tracy Strong" <tstrong@weber.ucsd.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Copies of Life mag pictures and articles re Gripsholm

Date: lundi 5 mars 2007 0:06

 

Don -- is there any chance you could copy me on these

-- many thanks

TBS

--

Tracy B. Strong

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Copies of Life mag pictures and articles re Gripsholm

Date: lundi 5 mars 2007 3:26

 

 

Sure, Tracy.

 

I'll copy you on what I send Leopold.

 

Donald

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Copies of Life mag pictures and articles re Gripsholm

Date: lundi 5 mars 2007 7:39

 

--- Leopold <tapol@skynet.be> wrote:

"On the right of the picture representing the New York arrival, there is a symbol representing an open book with the pages moving as if you were reading the story ---- click on that symbol --- and you will be able to read the whole text that I asked my computer to re-copy for me."

 

Splendid! Worked perfectly! I hadn't thought to try that page-flipper.

Interesting, though it didn't include the interview I remember finding in the NYTimes back in graduate school. Perhaps that was a feature sidebar rather than part of the main story. I'll have to look it up one of these days.

 

> I remember the Shanghai American School. I was in the kindergarten ---. It was just two blocks away from where we lived --- the Picardie Building.

> Before we arrived in the school, there was a garden with a jungle-Jim.

> Must have been in 1948-49 before we left on board the s/s President Cleveland for San Francisco --- Best regards, Leopold

 

Just got up and checked my postWWII SAS yearbooks. No Leopold in the 1948 Columbian, but p.38 of the blue-bound 1947 Columbian shows a Leopold Pander grinning in the front row (second from left) of the kindergarten class picture.

That you? I'll try to CC a copy to you separately. (I was on pg27, junior class)

Also note a Jeanne Pander in 3rd grade.(front row, second from right) Sister?

00

That picture makes you an alumnus and a hot candidate for our next global

 all-SAS reunion in Salem, Mass., in fall 2008. (We now meet every three years in a different city, & I'm plugging for Shanghai in 2011 -- the centenniel of SAS and the overthrow of the Manchus) The postWWII alumni increasingly outnumber the preWWWII alumni attending.

 

If we can lure you to Salem, you would be the first attendee from your class, as best I know. But I'd be happy to collaborate in a global search to track down and recruit some of the other 27 listed. Left to right they include: (rear) Jeffrey Thomson, William Gray, James Laidlaw, Robert Gebo, Peter Gutter, Mickey Hu, Laurel Tsang, Victor Korbut; (middle) Gail Robertson, Gert Schoenfeld, Sharon Ring, Dorothy Fingerut, Betsy Downs, Norris Everett, Jacob Citrin; (front) Jones Malone, Leopold Pander, Raymond Yui, Louise Liu, George Macon, Ellen Rose, Christopher Beemer, Roy Aufwerber; (not present) Myrna Burkholder, Helen Craddock, Michael Flatow, Philip Jongeneel, Victor Yung.

 

Regards,     Ted Stannard SAS 37-38,46-48, chapei/gripsholm mar/dec43

 

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: "Janette & Pierre @ home" <pierre.ley@pandora.be>

Objet: Re: Copies of Life mag pictures and articles re Gripsholm

Date: lundi 5 mars 2007 12:23

 

Dear Ted,

Fantastic --- thanks for the pictures ---- It's me all right :-)) I never saw those pictures --- and the other picture with my sister Janette is also the good one. I'll be adding those photographs to our "family treasures" ---

Thanks again,

Leopold

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Raymond Moore

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, March 10, 2007 5:35 AM

Subject: Mrs Lack re Weihsien

 

 

Hello everyone.

 

I have been silent for some time, but have avidly read every word that has been contributed.

 

A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of meeting Greg Leck when he came to Melbourne (He signed my copy of his book!). I have been reading his book with great interest, but have not finished it yet. It certainly is a wonderfully complete record of civilian camps under the Japanese in China during the War.

 

I have also recently been doing some more work on my story which is on my website, and came across this letter which Mrs. Lack wrote to parents of Chefoo School children who had been in Weihsien. Thought it was interesting.

 

 

Dear all of you,

How are you after nearly four years?  I have had one Red Cross letter in three years and nine months, and I am afraid most of mine never left this camp.  I am afraid you must wait for the story of these years until I get out as work is almost night and day now as two of us are sorting and packing for the boys.  We have used curtains, mattress covers, table cloths, anything we could lay our hands on to cut out and make clothes they can wear when they travel home.  We have lost everything, and so has the school, except for our dirty bedding.  The bed bugs have been at their worst during this hot weather, and I am afraid our boxes will all have to be fumigated.

 

At last the war is over.  We heard it whispered by a Chinese, but we did not believe it because we have been hearing it at least once a week anyway.  Last Friday, on August 17th, an American B24 flew over.  We all knew it was not a Japanese place because it flew lower and lower, backwards and forwards and so low it blew our hats off.  We shouted and cheered and laughed and cried.  You can have no idea what this meant to us.  One of the children ran to me and said, AOh, Mrs. Lack, will Mummy know they are flying over us?@  AYes@ I said, Aby this evening it will be broadcast all over the world

Our children have been wonderful and it has not been easy for them.  We have had no beds for over three years and have hardly been able to keep clean with just one piece of soap a month.  Mr. Bruce, Mrs. Houghton and the boys have taken on the washing of sheets for the past eight months as we were all breaking down under it.  Four of us did it most of the time until I was ill last summer, then we started a squad arrangement, Mrs. Houghton, Miss Williams, Mrs. Henderson and I do the minor wash, but others relieve us for the last basket, and the sheets are done by the team I mentioned above.  Mending and finding clothes and bug fighting fill the rest of the time.  Now we look forward to beds, clean beds, and a meal set at a table.

 

To get back to August 17th.  After the American plane had flown back and forth over us for about 10 minutes, it suddenly rose to about 600 feet and to our surprise, seven men parachuted down, followed by 25 loads of supplies.  What a sight!  It was nearly more than we could bear.  Men dashed to the West Wall and over they went.  Then we all broke bounds, men, women and children ran past the Japanese guard and out through the gate while the guard stood helpless. After the men had parachuted down, they said they flew low because they thought they might be fired on, and also they had to be sure it was the right place as nobody was quite sure where the camp was.  The first thing the Major told us was that we must go back inside again as peace had not yet been signed, and it was still dangerous.  We are all quiet again now and do not expect to move yet.  The sick will leave by plane first, possibly this week, including one of our CIM boys.

 

We had a Victory supper yesterday outside on the playing field, where each had a tomato and an apple - a real feast as we had all been longing for some fresh fruit.  The Chinese have been sending in food too, so we are almost overwhelmed.  When we ran outside the gates on the day the Americans arrived, the Chinese were shocked at all the bare feet, and some of them picked up the children to carry them to the camp.  The men and the boys were all shirtless too, so gifts of vests have been coming in from Chinese outside.  I think the dear souls thought we had no clothes at all.  Chinese Christians keep coming to the gate to bring us food, but after the lean fare of the past years, we find we cannot eat so much now that we have it.  I was sick on Victory Day after eating an apple, but we will get used to it.

 

This is a sample of the menu we have been used to:

Breakfast  - bread and water

Lunch   -    stew and tea

Dinner   -   Soup and water.

Two slices of bread and clear tea once a day, no milk at all, a small amount of sugar till May of this year and since then none at all.  The little children and babies had a little milk.  We have had one Red Cross parcel since coming here, though the airmen tell us America sent one every month.@

 

My mother comments on this letter as follows:                                                                               
"This letter from Mrs. Lack was the first real news we had of the conditions Raymond had lived under for the past three years at least, and we marvelled that he looked as well as he did.  Unpacking his trunk, I was amused and moved to find one pair of pyjamas - one of the pairs I had sent him to school with five years before.  They had been added to a number of times as he grew, and the material was very thin and well patched.   A note from one of the staff apologised that the colour of the pyjamas and the few sheets she had sent back were such a dirty gray, but they had had to wash everything without soap, so it was impossible to get things really clean."

 

Bev & Ray Moore

4 Catherine Court Traralgon  Victoria 3844 Australia

Phone and Fax:  (613) 5174 0531

Website: http://home.vicnet.net.au/~raymoore

Blog: http://raym82.blogspot.com

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Fw: Greetings from New Member

Date: samedi 10 mars 2007 8:45

 

Hi Donald.

Yes please I would love one.  Joyce Bradbury. 100 Coxs Road North Ryde 2113.  Australia.    Do you realise it is almost two years since our great visit to Weifang? Joyce.

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Mrs Lack re Weihsien

Date: samedi 10 mars 2007 10:09

 

Dear Raymond,

Thanks for your web-site and blog address ---- fantastic :-))

Marvellous layout --- congratulations ---

Leopold

 

 

De: <grannydavies@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re:Donald Menzi.

Date: dimanche 11 mars 2007 2:33

 

Hello Donald Menzi, I would like to have your pictures from Weihsien,  

Thanks, Phyllis (Evans) Davies@  1328  Nesbitt Rd, Sagamore Hills, OH. 44067

 

 

De: "Eddie Cooke" <shedco@optusnet.com.au>

À: "Weihsien@Topica.Com" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Greetings from new member

Date: mercredi 14 mars 2007 1:25

 

Hi there Donald,

Yes please, I too would love a copy of your latest masterpiece! I just wish I had a fraction of your flair, creativity and computer knowhow .

Eddie Cooke,  7/23-25 Smalls Rd.  Ryde, N.S.W. 2112, Australia.

 

De: "John Stanley" <stanley@kutztown.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Weifang No. 2 Middle School

Date: lundi 19 mars 2007 2:28

 

Dear topica list:

 

This summer I will be traveling to Shandong for a research trip. I  was planning on returning to the No. 2 Middle School in Weifang (the  old camp) and seeing what has changed since my last visit. However, a  good friend who was there has moved on and I cannot find a webpage  for the school. Does anyone that went on the recent ceremony (2005 I  think) have a contact I might be able to use?

 

John Stanley

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weifang No. 2 Middle School

Date: lundi 19 mars 2007 6:44

 

Hullo John,

 

I'm glad you are interested in Weifang. Our host while we were there in 2005 was a remarkable gentleman named  Mr Sui Shude. I think Sui is his surname and Shude (probably pronounced Shoo Deh with accent on final syllable) is his given name. He acted as our tour guide and interpreter, and accompanied us nearly everywhere we went. He has an official position with the Weifang city government I believe. There's also a woman from Weifang city who has sent us some emails to keep in touch. She is asking us for information we may have that would help them to make a movie documentary of Weihsien Camp!

 

It's late and I must get to bed but I will send you the email addresses Monday morning!

 

Blessings!

 

David

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: "shude" <suishude@sohu.com>; "shude-1" <suishude@sina.com>

Objet: Re: Weifang No. 2 Middle School

Date: lundi 19 mars 2007 7:08

 

 

John,

 

Your host should definintely be Sui Shude, of the Weifang translator's bureau.  Two email addresses I have for him are:

 

suishude@sohu.com

suishude@sina.com

 

There may be a more recent address, which I will send you if I find it.  I think you find him and the other Weifang government people to be exceedingly graceous, wonderful hosts.

 

Donald

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: From Weifang China

Date: lundi 19 mars 2007 9:07

 

--- This message must help you to contact Mr. Sui Shude ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

----- Original Message -----

From: suishude@sohu.com

To: Neil Yorkston

Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2006 4:47 PM

Subject: From Weifang China

 

 

From Sui Shude, Weifang China

 

Dear Weihsieners and Weihsien Friends-related,

 

 

Today Last yyear, August 17th 2006, Weifang People's Government and Weifang Foreign Affairs Office held the celebration on "The 60th Anniversary of the Liberation of the Weihsien Camp" in Weifang, China. It is a big gathering and a successful meeting for all Weihsieners and families, and an important time and chance for Weihsieners and families to visit and explore the old concentration camp site, to evoke the past memories, to seek and talk to old friends and to establish friendship with new friends, the People of Weifang.

 

 

I am so proud that in that short period of time, with the help of many friends all over the world, to find, contact and invite so many Weihsieners and families for the occasion. Here I want to say THANK YOU to those friends who offered great help to me on my contacting job.

 

 

I especially want to extend my sincere thanks to Assemblywoman Mary Previte of U.S.A., Bill Einreinhofer, David Beard, David Birch, Desmond Power, Donald Menzi, Estelle Cliff Horne, Francis Joyce, Gladys Swift, Ian Grant, James Taylor, Jim More, Joyce Bradbury, Leopold Pander, Natasha Petersen, Neil Yorkston, Nicky Leopold, Norman Cliff,Pamela Masters, Roy Campbell, Tracy Strong and many other friends that all on my list.

 

 

We are so happy that all the people participated in the meeting enjoy their trip and stay. We are so happy that our government find the right time to hold a celebration like that. We are so happy that the celebration aroused the interest of so many people and sounded the whole world.

 

 

Weifang People's Government will try all the best to maintain the camp-site well, as well as the exhibition rooms and the old houses, and to furnish more and more new-collected articles, information and content to it, to preserve this historical site forever to tell and teach the younger generations. And most important, to keep it for memories and visits of all Weihsieners and their ! families all over the world.

 

 

Today, as the contacting organizer of the the celebration meeting, I am thinking of you all, who came to the celebration, who contacted me for information of the event and who visited the camp-site with me.....

 

 

I wish you all the best and look forward to see any of you again in Weifang.

 

 

 

Sui Shude

 

 

Foreign and Overseas Chinese Affairs Office of

Weifang People's Government

E-mail: suishude@sohu.com

E-Mail: emailshude@yahoo.com.cn

Tel/Fax:++86-536-8233692

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      超大U盘免费等你拿 

 

   *用搜狗拼音写邮件体验更流畅的中文输入>> 

 

--^----------------------------------------------------------------

 

De: "guiying China" <jennywang1974@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weifang No. 2 Middle School

Date: mardi 20 mars 2007 13:19

 

 

Hello John:

This is jenny, director of foreign affairs office, Weifang municipal

Government. I am so glad that you are interested in our camp, and hope to be of help now we are preparing to make a movie documentary about it and scheduled to go to Canada an Europe in May to interview some survivors since you are making research on it, so could you introduce some candidates to interview.

RGDS

JENNY

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: NY Times and Life Magazine Coverage of The Gripsholm

Date: mardi 20 mars 2007 17:08

 

I have finally figured out how to distribute copies of the NY Times and Life magazine coverage of the Gripsholm without having to make CDs for everyone.  If  you will go to my "family" web site - http://d.menzi.org - and click on the word 'Directory" at the top of the page, you will find a section called "Special Downloads."  Clicking on the documents listed there will open them and you can copy them to your computer, saving them to whatever folder you wish.  If you don't already have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is necessary to the process, it also tells you how to get it.

 

This should take care of everyone who sent me an email asking for a copy of these articles - and anyone else who is interested, too.  If you are unable to get this to work, let me know and we'll figure something else out.

 

By the time you have finished reading this, Leopold will probably have already  made them available for downloading from the main Wehsien site, but you may find this route simpler to navigate.

 

Donald

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: 1945 Leaflet - also Life and NY Times Gripholm coverage

Date: mardi 20 mars 2007 17:09

 

Hello, all,

 

A friend of mine who was interned in Shanghai as a young boy recently went back to his old stamp collection and came across one of the leaflets that was dropped by U.S. planes in August 1945 telling Allied prisoners that the war was almost over and they would be liberated soon.  I have attached a jpeg file copy of the leaflet.

Does anyone remember this from Weihsien?

 

Also, I have finally figured out how to distribute copies of the NY Times and Life magazine coverage of the Gripsholm without having to make CDs for everyone.  If  you will go to my "family" web site - http://d.menzi.org  - and click on the word 'Directory" at the top of the page, you will find a section called "Special Downloads."  Clicking on the documents listed there will open them and you can copy them to your computer, saving them to whatever folder you  wish.  If you don't already have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is necessary to the process, it also tells you how to get it.

 

This should take care of everyone who sent me an email asking for a copy of these articles - and anyone else who is interested, too.  If you are unable to get this to work, let me know and we'll figure something else out.

 

By the time you have finished reading this, Leopold will probably have already made them available for downloading from the main Wehsien site, but you may find this route simpler to navigate.

 

Donald

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: 1945 Leaflet - also Life and NY Times Gripholm coverage

Date: mardi 20 mars 2007 17:58

 

 

By now you have probably received at least two versions of my last email - one with the leaflet attached and one without, because Topica kept bouncing them back until I had reduced the size of the attached file sufficiently and I wasn't sure that the leafletted version would ever make it.

 

I would add that I have also made available for downloading Howard Galt's memoirs of his time in Weihsien and the Gripsholm journey.  I learned about these documents from the end notes in John Hersey's novel, The Call and obtained copies from the Yale Divinity School library archives.  They are both relatively short and very readable.

 

I have also posted a document describing my grandparents' Gripsholm experience. My grandmother's is a satirical piece about life aboard the Teia Maru, while George Wilder's describes the entire journey from an ornithologist's viewpoint, which may be mostly of interest to bird-lovers.

 

I'm happy that the Gripsholm material has turned out to be of interest to so many of you.  It adds to the pleasure of assembling it.  

 

Donald

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: 1945 Leaflet - also Life and NY Times Gripholm coverage

Date: mardi 20 mars 2007 18:37

 

Thanks Donald ---- all is absolutely perfect, readable and printable ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Alison Holmes" <aholmes@prescott.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: 1945 Leaflet - also Life and NY Times Gripholm coverage

Date: mardi 20 mars 2007 19:50

 

Oh I am so pleased to see this leaflet!  I have remembered it vividly and so have been surprised that others have not been mentioning it, but in my memory I have conflated the pamphlets and the liberation on the same morning.  I see us in the church having a singing lesson, seeing the plane out of the window, running past the ineffectively protesting teacher, out on to the roll call field, seeing the pamphlets, then seeing the plane re-circle and finally the seven brightly coloured parachutes and rushing to the main gate.  What tricks memory can play!

Alison

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: 1945 Leaflet - also Life and NY Times Gripholm coverage

Date: mardi 20 mars 2007 20:32

 

 

Alison,

 

Your memory may not be faulty.  This one came from Shanghai, and may have been dropped earlier.  I think the last letter we had indicated that the US military wasn't certain exactly where Weihsien was located, and they may not have leafletted it at the same time as Shanghai.  It's very possible - even likely - that they were dropped the same day as the parachutists. 

 

What do others of you remember?

 

Donald

 

De: "lucy lu" <lucy9859@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

Date: mercredi 21 mars 2007 11:02

 

Dear Donald Menzi,

 

Glad to say that I’ve got your CD mailed which is so precious and interesting. I’ll value it very much. Now I’d like to, on behalf of Ms. Wang, director of Weifang foreign and overseas Chinese affairs office, say thanks very much for your kindness and helpfulness.

 

Best regards.

 

Sincerely,

 

lucy

interpreter and vice section chief,

section for america and oceania,

weifang foreign and overseas chinese affairs office

 

 

 

 

De: "rod miller" <rmmiller@optusnet.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: 1945 Leaflet - also Life and NY Times Gripholm coverage

Date: jeudi 22 mars 2007 5:07

 

Donald

 

>I'm happy that the Gripsholm material has turned out to be of interest to so many of you.  It adds to the pleasure of assembling it.

> 

>Donald

 

Many thanks for all your efforts.

 

Rod 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Weihsie -- facts about its early history as a college

Date: dimanche 25 mars 2007 0:17

 

 

Here's an early history of the COURTYARD OF THE HAPPY WAY that later became the “Weihsien Civilian Assembly  Center.”

This fascinating excerpt comes from “The First in China  College,” an  article by Moses Chu, recently printed in Chinese in eBaoMonthly.com an internet  magazine.   Mr. Chu has  translated the article into English and has given me permission me to reproduce  this account.   

Mary T. Previte

The first college in  China was established in  Tengchow, Shantung, in 1876, not far from  Chefoo (now called Yantai). Built on the ruins of the “Temple of the Goddess of Mercy,” it was founded by Calvin  Mateer, D.D., an American Presbyterian missionary from Pennsylvania.   But the name, Tengchow College of Liberal  Arts was not formally adopted until 1882.  Mateer’s aim was to create a college with the best teachers of the  highest academic and moral standards and to train pastors to spread Christianity  in China.

He believed that since social superstitions had held China back from keeping up with the  developing world, this situation could be improved only by spreading  Christianity. He insisted that English should not be taught to Chinese unless it  was absolutely necessary, because the graduates should teach and serve the  common people in China. So Mateer insisted that  students study from Chinese, not English, textbooks.  He himself wrote many of his college  textbooks in Chinese, many of them books on science. 

Usually he was stern and serious in  manner, a splendid image in those days for a school principal.   Students nicknamed him “Di Lao Hu,”  roughly translated  “Di, the Tiger.”  He forbade the use of tobacco and  alcohol either inside or outside the campus.  During Dr. Mateer’s tenure at  Tengchow  College, 79 students  graduated.

Henry Winters Luce, a Presbyterian  missionary, was also a teacher at the college.  (Luce was the father of Henry R. Luce,  who later founded and became Managing Director of the America’s Time, Life, and Fortune  publishing empire.) 

When an already-existing  school at Weihsien was  burned during the Boxer Rebelion of 1900,  Henry Winters Luce raised money to rebuild it as a  university.

In 1901, Watson M. Hayes, D.D.,  Calvin Mateer’s successor,  left Tengchow College to establish a provincial college in Tsinan  (now called Jinan, the provincial capital) and  also established the first daily newspaper in Shandong province. The college was moved to  Weihsien in 1904.  Weihsien was  halfway by rail between Tsingtao (Qingdao) and  Tsinan.  Simultaneously, the Tengchow

College merged with a college founded by  British Baptists in Tsingchow (now called Yidu).

The new school at Weihsien became a  university with colleges of the arts, medicine, and theology with 120  students.  Due to primitive transportation using only mules, it took more than a year for the laboratory and workshops to be set up on the new college campus.  Living on the campus during his retirement, Calvin Mateer erected a windmill near his workshop, a landmark  visible for a few miles southeast of the city of Weihsien.  He continued to write, translate, publish, preach, and travel.  The campus was named “Le-Dao-Yuan” or “The Courtyard of the Happy  Way.”

In 1917,  the college moved from Weihsien to Tsinan  and merged with medical colleges from Hankow, Naning, Peking, Mukden and became known as  Cheeloo  University with additional  support from over ten foreign missionary groups. 

Today, the Cheeloo University site is  used by Shandong University. 

During World War II (1941-1945)  after Japan attacked Pearl  Harbor, the Japanese turned the old Le-Dao-Yuan campus into an internment  camp called the “Weihsien Civilian Assembly Center.”  About 1,500 nationals of all Allied  countries from north China were imprisoned there until  they were liberated by a team of American rescuers, August 17, 1945.  

Among the prisoners interned at  Weihsien were Watson M. Hayes, his wife and son. Hayes was a successor to Calvin  Mateer and a founder and principal of the North China Theological Seminary  established in Tenghsien.  For many reasons, he refused to be repatriated  under the 1943 prisoner exchange arranged by the International Red Cross.  Watson Hayes, 86, died in 1944 just one  year before the camp was liberated.  

(Note from Mary Previte:  What  memories have you of John Hayes, the son of Watson Hayes, in  Weihsien?)

(Moses Chu, a scholar, businessman,  and prolific writer, grew up in Chefoo, China.  His father was a student of Dr. Calvin  Mateer. Mr Chu now lives in Tempe, Arizona.)

 

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsie -- facts about its early history as a college

Date: dimanche 25 mars 2007 1:43

 

--- MTPrevite@aol.com wrote:

> Among the oprisoners interned at  Weihsien were Watson M. Hayes, his wife and son. Hayes was a successor to Calvin  Mateer and a founder and principal of  the North China Theological Seminary  established in Tenghsien. 

> For many reasons, he refused to be repatriated  under the 1943 prisoner exchange arranged by the International Red Cross.  Watson Hayes, 86,  died in 1944 just one  year before the camp was liberated.  

> (Note from Mary Previte:  What  memories have you of John Hayes, the son of  Watson Hayes, in  Weihsien?)

 

Mary, I was at Chapei, not Weihsien, but on the Gripsholm I ran with a fellow 12-year-old named Johnny Hayes -- not likely the son of an 85-year-old! But quite possibly a grandson, if Watson's son John also had a wife & son there.

Anybody know?  I've wondered ever since what happened to Johnny and two other members of our Gripsholm gang of five, Charlie Loucks and David Philippi. The fifth, Carl Scovel, was my schoolmate at Shanghai American School after WWII, and we've kept in touch ever since.

         Ted Stannard  [R.E.Stannard Jr.]

 

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsie -- facts about its early history as a college

Date: dimanche 25 mars 2007 2:35

 

I did google up this information on John David Hayes, Watson Hayes son, and learned there that his wife and two youngest of their fivechildren had been sent to the Philippines, where they were later interned and then repatriated in 1943. Very likely one was the Johnny Hayes I knew. But no names of any of the kids. Any further information appreciated.

Ted Stannard

=================

 

http://webtext.library.yale.edu/xml2html/divinity.127.con.html

John David Hayes

Chronology 

 

1888 Feb 23  Born in Tengchowfu, Shantung Province, China - son of Presbyterian missionaries Watson MacMillan Hayes and Margaret Young Hayes

1910  A.B., Princeton University

1911  Appointed Rhodes Scholar from Ohio as candidate from Wooster College (x'09)

1914  B.A., Oxford University, England

1914-1915  Service with Y.M.C.A. in France

1916  Married Barbara M. Kelman

1917  B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary

1917-1952  Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. missionary in China. Hayes was in charge of Presbyterian student Christian work in Peking, China, 1917-1943. He was also Executive Chairman of the American Presbyterian Mission, member of the China Council, member of the Board of Directors of Yenching University, and on various other boards for many years.

1918 -1931  Involved in various flood and famine relief projects

1925 -1942  Served on faculty and administration of College of Chinese Studies,

Peking

1943 Mar - 1945 Sep  Interned by Japanese authorities in Weihsien Civilian Assembly Centre, Shantung Province.

1948  Returned to China, serving in Kueiyang, Kweichow Province.

1949 -1951 Mar  Taught at government university following Communist takeover

1951 Oct - 1952 Sep  Jailed by Communists

1955  Went to Indonesia to work with students

1957  Died from injuries suffered in an automobile accident in Indonesia

 

=================================

http://www.mundus.ac.uk/cats/3/28.htm

Hayes, John D. (1888-1957) and Hayes, Barbara M. (b 1893)

 

Administrative/Biographical history:

John David Hayes, American Presbyterian missionary in China and Indonesia, was born in 1888 in Shantung Province, China, the son of American missionaries. He was educated at Princeton then won a Rhodes scholarship to study at Oxford, England after which he studied at New College, Edinburgh and Princeton Theological College, graduating from the latter in 1917. He went to China in the same year accompanied by his wife, Barbara (née Kelman) whom he had met at Oxford and had married in 1916. Hayes was based in Peking where he was in charge of student Christian work, and, being keen to promote unity, was largely instrumental in the formation of a nation-wide Chinese Student Christian Union. From the mid 1920s he was also involved with language teaching at the College of Chinese Studies in Peking. He was an active member of many Church, community and mission councils and was particularly involved with organising the mission's response to famine in the surrounding provinces and acting as a spokesman for the mission in its dealings with the authorities after Japanese occupation.

Barbara Hayes did mission work with women and with the children of missionaries as well as raising five children herself.

The Hayes were on furlough from 1923-24 and from 1936-37 when Hayes studied in London and at New York and Yale. In 1941 Barbara Hayes and her two youngest children were sent to the Philippines then repatriated to America in 1943. Hayes himself stayed on in China, he was interned in 1943, with his parents, at Weihsien and was returned to America in September 1945. He worked for a while as assistant pastor in a church in Washington, received his DD degree in 1948 from Wooster College and returned to China in the same year at the invitation of the Church of Christ in China.

The Hayes were assigned to the province of Kweichow in the south-west. In 1949, with the approach of the communists, Barbara Hayes was evacuated to Hong Kong where she worked for 18 months in the Church of Christ in China liaison office. John Hayes remained in Kweichow teaching in a government university and school until he was arrested in 1951 charged with being a spy. On his release in September 1952 he returned to America and spent the next two years travelling and speaking about his experiences. In 1955 he was appointed to Indonesia where again he worked with students and built up the Christian Normal College at Salatiga. On March 4 1957 he died as a result of injuries received in a car accident.

After his death Barbara Hayes travelled throughout America speaking on behalf of the mission until her retirement in 1959 in New York.

 

 

 

 

De: "georgeanna knisely" <jknisely@paonline.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsie -- facts about its early history as a college

Date: dimanche 25 mars 2007 3:00

 

John Hayes was our neighbor in Weihsien with his parents. He married my husband and me in 1955. Johnny Hayes and John's mother were in the Philippines (did you pick expats up there also on the Gripsholm?) and so maybe you are right. Johnny Hayes took me to my first play in DC when I was in Gettysburg College.

I am now 74 years old. Do not have an address for him. John Hayes was killed in an accident in Malaysia maybe early 60s, not certain. He was also put in prison under the Communists in southern China in the late 40s, early 50s and was accused of being a spy for the US. He was kicked out when he started converting his guards. Came home and the State Dept offered him a job. He said, No, he would have proved to his captors that they had been telling the truth, went to Malaysia to be a missionary instead. During that time I went as his "secretary" into the bowels of Library of Congress and took notes while he found material not open to just anyone. He was writing and explaining that at that time China did not have a justice system as we understand it. I wrote my History major thesis on that for my bachelor's. Prof said it was interesting, but no one could grade it because no one was qualified.

John Hayes' experience in Communist prison was written up in Reader's Digest - don't know when and not certain I have a copy - will look.

Georgie Reinbrecht Knisely

 

De: "Eddie Cooke" <shedco@optusnet.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: re 1945 leaflet

Date: dimanche 25 mars 2007 11:49

 

Alison and anyone else interested--

I'm pretty sure we didn't have any of the Shanghai pamphlets dropped on us, which state "In case of Japanese surrender...".and "the end is near".  I actually have one of those first leaflets that we in Weihsien had dropped on us and the first sentence reads "The JAPANESE Government has surrendered."  So it must have been after the war had ended and certainly after those "magnificent seven" had landed!  It goes on to tell us that the first drop of food and clothing "will arrive within (1) or (2) hours".

I clearly remember being in the hospital, which is still standing, having my lower lip dressed after I had split it a week earlier playing, looking out the window and seeing the B24 "Armoured Angel" with a pin up girl in a bathing suit painted on the side. The nurse dropped everything and ran out followed by me. I hightailed it back to my Block 2 and of course the rest is history.  I haven't got  a scanner but I'll try and have someone else put it on the Topica site.

Regards to all,    Eddie Cooke.

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsie -- facts about its early history as a college

Date: dimanche 25 mars 2007 20:35

 

Georgeanna, thanks for the interesting detail on John Hayes and Johnny. Do you have any idea what Johnny went on to do? The name is too common to be much use in an internet search without some other defining details. I've tried searches for John Hayes with other cue-words like "china" "philippines" "presbyterian" etc with little success. So if you knew what field of work or studies he went into, that might help narrow the search a bit. Or if you knew the names of his siblings or anything about them. It's not important, but it would be fun to try to make contact after six decades, even if he has no recollection of the Gripsholm "gang of five." Femmy and I may meander North America in our compact RoadTrek RVvan later this year, and it would be a lark to rendezvous for coffee if he were interested.

   Ted Stannard, Chapei/Gripsholm'43

 

De: "georgeanna knisely" <jknisely@paonline.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsie -- facts about its early history as a college

Date: dimanche 25 mars 2007 22:55

 

John Hayes ran for State Congress in Massachusetts on aplatform to reform  driving because of the number of deaths in the state and country - I have no clue how long ago.  I had an address for him in Mass. don't know what city, maybe 10 years ago, wrote back and forth maybe twice.  He is married, but I don't believe they have children, could be wrong.  Wish with all this flowing info.  I had kept many things, that in our travels I got rid of - sob!

Thank you or Mary for the John David Hayes papers at Yale.  Hoping to look them up.

Georgie (John would probably remember me as Dusty)Reinbrecht Knisely

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Donald Menzi

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, March 26, 2007 12:21 AM

Subject: Re: re 1945 leaflet

 

Eddie,

 

Daqvid Michell includes a reproduction of the leaflet you remember in "A Boy's War."  Norman Cliff also has the text of two other leaflets by General Wedemeyer, stating that they were dropped in August 1945 by American planes, but doesn't specifically say they were dropped on Weihsien.

 

Leopold already has them all somewhere in his site, but I'd love to get a scanned image of the one you have.  Could you email it directly to me at dmenzi@earthlink.net

 

Thanks.

 

What do others of you remember about this?

 

Donald

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: re 1945 leaflet

Date: lundi 26 mars 2007 8:37

 

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/NormanCliff/escape/p-AlliedPrisonners.htm

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/NormanCliff/escape/p-Wedemeyer.htm

Try these shortcuts ---

Leopold

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: John Hayes & others

Date: lundi 26 mars 2007 18:32

 

georgeanna, thanks for the information, though I'm not turning anything up on the internet about his campaign for office.

Do you know which party? Have any other personal details? A middle initial can be very useful. His profession? Where he went to college? Wife's name, perhaps?

Names of brothers or sisters?

The internet is a wonderful data base to search, but has so many thousands of hits for a common name like John Hayes that the problem becomes bringing the right John Hayes to the top. So these small things can help sort.

So far you are my only link!

Meanwhile, it's a long shot, but I'd also be delighted if anyone on this listserv should happen to know anything about my two other Gripsholm gangmates, Charlie Loucks and David Philippi (sp?)

Charlie's father was teaching medicine in Beijing, in the 20s or 30s, and was doctor on one or more of the noted Roy Chapman Andrews expeditions to Outer Mongolia that found some of the first dinosaur eggs ever recovered.

David Philippi came on board at Hong Kong, but I know nothing of his family.

 

Thanks, Ted Stannard  

 

De: "georgeanna knisely" <jknisely@paonline.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: John Hayes & others

Date: mardi 27 mars 2007 6:10

 

Sorry, I do not remember anything more.  I will try to see if I can find  someone else who might know about him.  I will keep your email.  Georgie

 

De: "rod miller" <rmmiller@optusnet.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: John Hayes & others

Date: mercredi 28 mars 2007 3:14

 

 

Ted

 

Have you thought about writing to Yale?

 From the link below the family of John David Hayes donated his papers.

 

http://webtext.library.yale.edu/xml2html/divinity.127.con.html

 

Yale University Library

Divinity Library Special Collections

409 Prospect Street

New Haven, Connecticut

<mailto:divinity.library@yale.edu>divinity.library@yale.edu 

 

Perhaps they could put you in touch with the family.

Might be worth an email.

 

R

 

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien -- facts about its early history as a college

Date: mercredi 28 mars 2007 5:19

 

Mary,

This material is utterly fascinating. Thank you for providing it! John Hayes was my guardian coming home from Qingdao to San Francisco on the USS Lavaca in 1945. I was still thirteen years old at the time. I will reminisce a little about that great experience shortly in a separate email. But I want you to know that I have been researching biographical material on Mr Hayes since reading your email, below. And I will also pass on what I know in a separate email.

With love

David Birch

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: "Weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Some notes on the life and times of John David Hayes 1888 - 1957

Date: mercredi 28 mars 2007 11:19

 

'The Brainwashing of John Hayes' Readers Digest July 1955

Written by Frederic Sondern, Jr

 

The above article was developed into a television drama with the teleplay written by George Bruce based on Sondern's article.

 

The television drama aired  7 November 1955 and was sponsored by TV Readers Digest.

 

In the TV program, the role of John Hayes was played by the actor Vincent Price. The TV program was also titled, "The Brainwashing of John Hayes."  A number of ethnic Chinese actors took the parts of the communist jailers.

 

The following notes are based on the Guide to the John David Hayes Papers, Compiled by Martha L. Smalley, Yale University Library, Divinity Library Special Collections. Copyright Yale University Library, Recon: 1997.  The material was a gift to the library by the Hayes Family.

 

You will find the material if you search on Google specifying,

Missionary John Hayes, Rhodes Scholar.

 

Chronology

 

1888 Feb 23 Born in Tengchowfu, Shandong Province, China -son of Presbyterian missionaries Watson MacMillan Hayes and Margaret Young Hayes

 

1910 A.B., Princeton University

1911 Appointed Rhodes Scholar from Ohio as candidate from Wooster College (x'09)

1914 B.A. Oxford University, England

1914-1915 Service with YMCA in France

1916  Married Barbara M Kelman

1917  B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary

1917 - 1952  Presbyterian Church in the USA missionary in China.  Hayes was in charge of Presbyterian student Christian work in Peking (Beijing) 1917 - 1943.  He was also Executive Chairman of the American Presbyterian Mission, member of the China Council, member of the Board of Directors of Yenching University, and on various other boards for many years.

1918 - 1931  Involved in various flood and famine relief projects.

1925 - 1942  Served on faculty and administration of College

of Chinese Studies, Peking

 

1943 Mar - 1945 Sep  Interned by Japanese authorities in      Weihsien Civilian Assembly Center, Shandong Province.

 

1948  Returned to China, serving in Kueiyang, Kweichow

           Province

1949 - 1951 Mar  Taught at government university following

           Communist takeover

1951 Oct - 1952 Sep Jailed by Communists

1955  Went to Indonesia to work with students

 

1957  Died from injuries suffered in an automobile accident

           in Indonesia.

 

There is quite a lot more. If you are interested you may find it through Google as I mentioned.

 

Blessings! John Hayes was a truly great man who gave his life and energy unstintingly in the service of the Lord Jesus Christ and his fellow humans regardless of race.

 

Sincerely

 

David

 

De: "Jie Lu" <ljoverseas@126.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: wf camp

Date: jeudi 29 mars 2007 9:15

 

Dear Sirs/Madams,

I'm from Weifang, formerly WeiHsien, and so interested in the history of Weifang internment camp from 1943 to 1945. recently I've read so many messages here about internees and Japanese guards that I wish to find some former Japanese guards and talk with them. Any information about them will be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks so much.

Jie Lu

weifang

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Some notes on the life and times of John David Hayes 1888 - 1957

Date: dimanche 1 avril 2007 3:20

 

Good job, David!  What fascinating information from you and Georgie  Knisley!

 

Thanks to both of you.

 

Mary Previte

 

 

De: "Eddie Cooke" <shedco@optusnet.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: re 1945 leaflet

Date: mardi 3 avril 2007 9:37

 

Hi all,

I've not been able to get the leaflet on to the Topica site, so far, but I will keep trying.  In the meantime, a Happy Easter to everyone.

Eddie.

 

De: "rod miller" <rmmiller@optusnet.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Comfort goods Teia Maru

Date: mardi 3 avril 2007 12:33

 

Hello

 The following is from http://www.salship.se/leck/captives_of_empire.asp  Gregs book.

 

Loaded aboard the Teia Maru were 1,600 short tons of humanitarian supplies valued at over US$1.3 million. The cargo included 140,000 thirteen pound food parcels, 2,885 cases of medical supplies, 7 million vitamin capsules, 950 cases of comfort articles for men and women, 24 million cigarettes, and clothing. These items were eventually unloaded in Manila for Philippine camps, and in Yokohama for distribution to camps in Japan and elsewhere in the Far East. Food, clothing, and comfort supplies were paid for or supplied by the United States government; medical supplies and tobacco by the American Red Cross, and books and recreational supplies by the YMCA. Religious materials came from the National Catholic Welfare Conference.

 

According to the Rabaul nurses diaries the Teia Maru arrived back in Yokohama harbour on the 14th of November 1943. At Christmas they received an individual food parcel each and one box, that was probably the comfort supplies described above, The Rabaul girls noted it as "Woolworths over flow". From the list of items that were in the box it would seem to me that some of the comfort articles including the children's clothing would have been better utilized by you. The contents of this box were put to good use by the Rabaul girls bartering for food. One of the surviving nurses (shes 92 and still as sharp as a tack) described the arrival of these boxes as a miracle as they were starving and the cigarettes were to them as good as gold pieces as they were highly sort after by the Japanese. My guess is that because there were so many of you, the logistics of moving so many parcels would have made it very difficult? My question is did any of this aid get through to China? Did you ever get Red Cross parcels at Weihsien? Did you get any Red Cross or Swiss Legation personal visiting Weihsien?

 

Do any of you know if there was any correlation between those chosen from Weihsien to go on the 2nd American exchange, Teia Maru to Goa, Gripsolm to New York? How were they selected? Did the Japanese just turn up with a list one day? Did you have any prior warning?

 

The reason for all the questions is that I have been researching the exchanges for many years now, for the Australian women were specifically chosen by a Japanese prince in Rabaul, for political purposes, to be part of the first British exchange. But as was typical for the times, completely illogical politics and bureaucracy [both sides] prevented their departure. There was only one British exchange and the women were trapped in Japan for the duration of the war. An American Etta Jones captured on the Island of Attu was added to the Australian group on their arrival in Yokohama. She was unlucky to have just miss the first exchange and by the 2nd I think the Japanese probably considered she knew to much. It is a long story.

 

Sorry about all the questions but there aren't to many people who were there left to ask any more...

 

Kind Regards

Rod

 

 

De: <grannydavies@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Comfort goods Teia Maru

Date: mercredi 4 avril 2007 0:56

 

My name was Phyllis Evans from Weihsien,

We did get some Red Cross packages but the Japanese opened them and took whatever they wanted out .then we got the meagre remainder. We also had visits from the Swiss consul. He was able to get an X-ray into camp badly needed .One death I know of might have been saved had we received the machine earlier.

Mostly the poor man was just wasting his time and efforts,

Our commandant was not very friendly.

 

De: "rod miller" <rmmiller@optusnet.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Comfort goods Teia Maru

Date: jeudi 5 avril 2007 0:31

 

Dear Phyllis

Thank you for your reply.

 

At 08:41 AM 4/04/2007, you wrote:

>My name was PhyllisEvans  from Weihsien, We did get some red cross packages but the Japanese opened them and took whatever they wanted out .then we got the meagre remainder.

 

I wondered if this isn't what happened in Yokohama but from what they have written and the list of contents that they noted in their diaries it seems the boxes were intact when they opened them.

The Rabaul nurses were in a funny situation for they had been taken and held in Japan specifically for the exchange. In the beginning they were treated quite well for Australia held a large number of Japanese from the Netherlands East Indies that had knowledge of the oil fields and rubber production. As the war progressed and the  chances of the nurses being exchanged decreased, their treatment became very very bad and they were starved.

 

>  We also had visits from the Swiss consul.

 

I wonder if you could remember what year this might have been?

 

>He  was able to get  an Xray into camp badly needed .

 

Ahh this is interesting. Did you ever wonder why the Japanese suddenly let him bring such a item to your camp?

 

>One death I know of might have been saved had we recieved the machine earlier.Mostly the poor man was just wasting his time and efforts,Our  commandant was not very friendly.

 

Well at least you had a commandant! The Rabaul girls only had guards and they changed all the time because they got bored to death doing nothing. At one point they had a couple of guards who were quite vicious and they were lucky to survive their reign of terror. From what I've read on these pages that is where you were a little better off. There were a lot of you and you had enough to do. The Rabaul women were kept together in close quarters for 3 years 9 months. Near the end I suggest it was almost "every man for himself" for them. But as Lornatold me just last year when we were discussing the Red Cross boxes that arrived in Dec 1943 "miracles do happen".

In Japan they had a Japanese cook that was with them for nearly the whole of the war but he lost family in the fire bombing of Tokyo near the end and also left.  The cook was on a good thing. I'm sure his family and friends were well fed and the women came last. There were somevery high Japanese Government officials involved with the internment of these women some very big Japanese names but apart from the women's diaries their names don't appear much in any post war documentation I have been able to find. Funny about that. ;-)

 

Thanks again.

 

Rod

 

De: <grannydavies@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Comfort goods Teia Maru

Date: jeudi 5 avril 2007 6:26

 

Dear Rod, you are welcome, for the reply. I was able to attend the Old China Hands Reunion in Portland Oregon last summer met a lot of people from Shanghai and Hong Kong. Am glad I went. My father was friends with most of the consuls in Tientsin, My sister was married to the Danish consul. The Japanese consul came to our house when he heard we were being interned. The diplomatic service had no knowledge of Pearl Harbor coming. He was very upset. He told us he would do anything he could to help us but had no control over camp as it was military. When my father was dying he gave my sister and her husband a very generous pass  to come down and see him, but the camp commandant only let them in twice. My father died there. Phyllis

 

 

De: "rod miller" <rmmiller@optusnet.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Comfort goods Teia Maru

Date: mardi 10 avril 2007 3:07

 

Dear Phyllis

 

At 02:04 PM 5/04/2007, you wrote:

>Dear Rod, you are welcome, for the reply. I was able to attend the

>Old China Hands Reunion in Portland Oregon last summer met a lot of

>people from Shangai and Hongkong. am glad I went.My father was

>friends with most of the consuls in Tientsin, My sister was married

>to the Danish consul.

>The Japanese consul came to our house when he heard we were being interned.

 

So your sister wasn't interned due to her husband’s diplomatic status?

 

>The diplomatic service  had no knowledge of Pearl Harbor coming.He

>was very upset.He told us he would do anything he could to help us

>but  had no control over camp as it was military. When my father was

>dying he gave mysister and her husband a very generous pass  to come

>down and see him, but the camp commandant only let them in twice.My

>father  died there.Phyllis

 

I'm sorry to hear about your father it must have been very hard for you.

If I understand this correctly the Japanese consul gave your sister a travel pass to come down and see you but the camp commandant was reluctant to let her visit. Any idea why?

It must have been confusing for your family outside of China, you being interned and your sister free?

 

Kind Regards

Rod

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: John Hayes & others

Date: jeudi 12 avril 2007 6:27

 

Hi Folks,

I remember Mr Hayes well. He was my guardian, and the guardian of all the Chefoo children being repatriated on the USS Lavaca, an attack troop transport vessel from Qingdao to San Francisco in October/November 1945. I was thirteen at the time.

 

When Mary Previte ( a former classmate of mine at Chefoo and Weihsien) asked recently on Weihsien@topica, if any of us had memories of John Hayes from Weihsien Camp days, I decided to do my own research.

 

I remembered from long ago hearing that Mr Hayes had, as a young man, been a Rhodes Scholar from the United States. I also recalled having many, many years ago read an article about him in Readers Digest. There had been mention in the article, I recalled, of Mr Hayes's detention and torture by the Chinese communists after World War II.

 

So I simply typed in to the search engine, GOOGLE, a few particulars. Within a minute or two I had information about the Digest article, as well as particulars on actual copies of the relevant magazine issue. As I recall, you can obtain a copy of this magazine, the original, for a little over $9.00 US.

 

Then I typed in to Google, Missionary John David Hayes, Rhodes Scholar. Again, within moments, I had pages of valuable information including a timeline of his life, date of birth, etc., dates of colleges attended and graduation date. Date accepted as Rhodes Scholar, date of marriage and name of spouse. You can get it all by simply typing in what I typed in to Google (mentioned above).

 

Incidentally, while we were traveling across the Pacific Ocean, Mr Hayes offered the services of the Chefoo youngsters to the captain of the USS Lavaco, a very friendly and accommodating gentleman. So we all put in a shift cleaning up the washrooms on the ship! At least I clearly recall that the boys, including myself, polished the fawcets and buffed up the hand basins in the Men's Heads!

 

Mr Hayes made sure that the captain saw the results of our work.  The final result was that the captain gathered us youngsters together and awarded us special certificates of recognition of our services to the United States Navy.  To this day I have my treasured certificate giving my name and stating that in recognition of my services performed at Latitude such and such and Longitude so and so, I was hereby made an honorary cockswain in the United States Navy.

 

Of course, after that, regardless of Mr Hayes's academic achievements at Princeton and Oxford and in Shandong, he assumed the larger-than-life role of Very Great Man to me!

 

I am privileged to have known Mr Hayes as a personal friend!

 

Sincerely

David Birch

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Weihsien and Gripsholm "Slide Shows"

Date: mardi 17 avril 2007 3:53

 

Hello fellow Weihsieners,

 

For some time now I have been trying to figure out how to get the Weihsien "Walking Tour," Gripsholm Repatriation Voyage and 60th Anniversary Celebration "slide shows" onto a web site so anyone could see (and hear) them whenever they might want to.  I finally found a program (Camtasia Studio) that made it possible, and have posted them on my "family" web-site where you can view them if you care to.  The same page also contains links to the New York Times and Life Magazine articles on The Gripsholm journey and also the Wilders' and Howard Galt's memoirs of Weihien and the Gripsholm, all of which you can download to your computer and print. 

 

The animation on the slide shows is a little more "jerky" than I would like, and I still plan to send CDs to those of you who have specifically requested them.

 

To view the videos, go to the following web site: http://d.menzi.org (note that there is no "www." Then click on the "Weihsien-Gripsholm" link at the top of the page.  Be sure your speakers are turned on so you can to hear the background music, which starts after the first few frames.

 

It is possible that you will need to download some free software to play them.  Just follow the on-screen instructions and that shouldn't be too difficult.  Let me know if you encounter any insurmountable problems.

 

All the best,

 

Donald Menzi

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: unabridged article about 1st college in China, once located at Weihsien

Date: mardi 17 avril 2007 5:16

 

 

 

 

Hello, Everybody:

 

You'll be interested in the unabridged article written by Moses Chu for  eBao Magazine.  The first college in China  was at  one time located at the compound that later became the Weihsien Civilan Assembly  Center.  I've included access here  to both the Chinese and the  English translation of Mr. Chu's article.

 

 

_http://www.ebaomonthly.com:2480/ebao/readebao.php?eID=e01822_

(http://www.ebaomonthly.com:2480/ebao/readebao.php?eID=e01822)

 

 

Leopold Pander has also included it on his Weihsien web  site: 

_http://www.weihsien-paintings.org_ (http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/)

 

You can access it at the logo listed below.  Thank you, Leopold.

 

 (http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/Mprevite/EbaoMonthly/CalvinMateer.htm )

 

Mary Previte

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien and Gripsholm "Slide Shows"

Date: mardi 17 avril 2007 21:09

 

For some reason the Menzi file would not open for me.

~Dwight

 

--

4728A Lakeshore Lane S.E.

Olympia, WA 98513

360.456.4300

thewhipples@comcast.net

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Donald Menzi

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, April 17, 2007 9:41 PM

Subject: Re: Weihsien and Gripsholm "Slide Shows"

 

Dwight (and anyone else having trouble opening it)

Be sure you use the exact address:  http://d.menzi.org - with no www in front of it.  If clicking on the link doesn't do it try copying this into your address line.  You might also try http://wilder.menzi.org ,

Let me know if this works.  If not, I'll try to trouble-shoot it from here.

Donald

De: <smallchief@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien and Gripsholm "Slide Shows"

Date: mardi 17 avril 2007 23:04

 

The downloads worked perfectly for me.  The "Walking Tour" of Weihsien  is

quite a production.  Thanks for making it available.  S. Chief

 

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien and Gripsholm "Slide Shows"

Date: mercredi 18 avril 2007 10:40

 

Dear Dwight,

Try clicking on one of these links ---

http://reced.org/dmenzi/wilders/Weihsien_04-10-07/Weihsien_04-10-07.html

 

http://reced.org/dmenzi/wilders/Gripsholm_04-10-07-b/Gripsholm_04-10-07-b.html

 

http://reced.org/dmenzi/wilders/Gripsholm_Chinese_04-12-07/Gripsholm_Chinese_04-12-07.html

 

http://reced.org/dmenzi/wilders/Weifang_Web_4-11-07/Weifang_Web_4-11-07.html

 

if that doesn't work --- make sure your computer has "flash player" installed ---

 

--- Click on this link:

 

http://www.adobe.com/shockwave/download/download.cgi?P1_Prod_Version=ShockwaveFlash

 

Good luck and best regards ---

 

Leopold

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Weihsien and Gripsholm "Slide Shows"

Date: mercredi 18 avril 2007 16:49

 

I clicked too fast on the "send-a-message" icon ---

I wanted to add that Don has done a marvellous job and it's real nice of him to share it with all of us :-))  ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien and Gripsholm "Slide Shows"

Date: mercredi 18 avril 2007 18:26

 

Thanks, Leopold.  The flash player did the trick.  Somehow it must have become uninstalled on my computer.  Works fine now.

~Dwight

 

--

De: "rod miller" <rmmiller@optusnet.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Donald's must see slide shows!!

Date: jeudi 19 avril 2007 5:36

 

Dear Donald

As a complete outsider to this topica group I have to tell you that your new slide show web sites are just amazing!!!

I only arrived here through researching the internee exchanges and knew nothing of Weihsien till I happened upon Leopold's terrific site. I was lucky enough to start reading here just prior to your return trip to Weihsien. The story of the trip,the photographs, stories of Weihsien and your liberation have been unfolding before my eyes ever since. Your new slide shows, with the little water colours and other information, just bring it all together beautifully.

 

I could go on about how interesting and educational your sites are but I'm sure all others who read this topica groupand view your sites will agree that you, Leopold and all those that have written books are to be congratulated for what you have achieved.

 

If I ever get to China, and I do intend getting there one day, I am going to put Weihsien on my must see list!

 

Thanks again for making the story of Weihsien come to life and finally [for me anyway] putting faces to names.

 

Rod Miller

Sydney OZ

 

P.S. I never knew there had been escapees from Weihsien. In Rabaul the Japanese threatened to kill 10 men for every         one that escaped.

P.P.S Nothing about the animations seemed to jerky down here. But I do run a very high end video card with a lot of on board memory.

           If you would like some completely pedantic feed back it would seem to me that on the walk tour site some of the music           may have been digitized at fractionally to higher level as it seems to be distorting ever so slightly at the top end.

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: google earth

Date: jeudi 3 mai 2007 11:48

 

Hello all,

I recently found out that you could insert your photos on Google Earth. It's very interesting and free :-))  There are some marvellous photographs from all over the world.

Click on this link: (for the few views I selected for Weihsien)

http://www.panoramio.com/user/422240

--- of course, you can add your personal pictures too --- and locate them very exactly on a map.

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "georgeanna knisely" <jknisely@paonline.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Donald's must see slide shows!!

Date: vendredi 4 mai 2007 17:14

 

I would love a CD if you can, then can have ready whenever.  Great appreciation.  Georgie Knisely,

38 Clemens Drive, Dillsburg, PA 17019-1366

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Norman Cliff

Date: mercredi 16 mai 2007 3:58

 

Sad news, Everyone.  I've received the following e-mail, dated May 13,  from Estelle Cliff     

 

"Norman (Cliff) didn't wake up this morning, Sunday - except in Heaven. He was 82. Joyce took him a cup of tea and couldn't wake him. A terrible shock for her, but a wonderful way to go."

 

What a loss to all of us!  Norman ranks as one of  Weihsien's most prolific historians.  I hope all of you have read  his  1977  book, Courtyard of the Happy  Way.  He made significant contributions to the Weihsien  Visitors' Center.

 He was a major contributor to a recently-published  book about teachers in the Chefoo School.

 

Mary T. Previte

 

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Norman Cliff

Date: mercredi 16 mai 2007 10:51

 

Dear Mary. I am profoundly saddened by the sad news about Norman Cliff. I knew him very well in camp. He was such a lovely man in every respect. He taught me shorthand that helped me get my first job both in China and then when we I came to Australia. I have had his book for many years and he has responded to my many questions. I wish to tender my sincere condolences to his wife and family. Joyce Bradbury/Cooke. -----

 

De: "Leopold Pander" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Norman Cliff

Date: jeudi 17 mai 2007 0:10

 

I got to know many of you by the Internet but visually very few --- I have a great friendship for Norman. He trusted me by lending all his original documents and scrap-books for my web site. We met Joyce and Norman twice at his house in London. He greeted us so warmly ---- I will never forget.

--- It's a sad day ---

Nicky and Leopold

 

De: "Leopold Pander" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Armored Angel

Date: jeudi 17 mai 2007 1:24

 

Hello all,

Found an interesting link on the Internet ----

http://www.b24bestweb.com/armoredangel.htm

 

---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Natasha Petersen" <np57@cox.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: emails

Date: jeudi 17 mai 2007 3:06

 

I am so sorry that some of you are having trouble sending emails to Weihsien/Topica.

 

My deep condolences to the family of Norman Cliff.  He shall be missed.  May the kingdom of heaven be his.

 

Natasha

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Norman Cliff

Date: jeudi 17 mai 2007 4:53

 

Thank you so much, Natasha.  Some of my messages to Topica  register.  Some do not.   I'll keep trying.

 

  You've given  all us such a WONDERFU:L means of  communicating.

 

Mary

 

 

 

 

From: David Birch <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: Norman Cliff April 4, 1925 - May 13, 2007

To: weihsien@topica.com

 

Thanks to Mary for passing on the sad news re Norman Cliff's death.

 Norman Cliff was a true Christian gentleman and a great "Old Chefusian!"  Norman not only took all his pre-university education at Chefoo/Yantai, but even had the distinction of being born there.

 

I well remember Norman Cliff, from Chefoo, Temple Hill and Weihsien. At the end of the war, when I was a thirteen-year-old boy, Norman was a young man of twenty!  Norman sometimes got me to do errands for him, not hard to do since I admired this  older boy so much.  One errand I used to perform, in particular, was taking down expired notices from Weihsien Camps exterior bulletin boards. I'd bring them back to Norman.  Years later I realized that Norman was collecting those notices as a way of documenting some of the Weihsien history he was already busily researching for his books.

 

Norman was a true man of the Christian faith who unfalteringly lived the life which  Christ modeled for us in His Own life!

 

A final observation I want to make of Norman is of the selfless way in which he always worked so diligently to help others who he realized needed that help.  About a year and a half ago, I received an email from Norman asking me if I had received the "Ex Gratia" payment which Her Majesty's Government  was granting to British subjects who had suffered internment in the Far East under the Japanese.

 

One very well-meaning former Weihsiener had told me that Canadians did not  qualify for this compensation for some technical historical reason.  I explained that when I had learned this, I had withdrawn my application.

 

Norman patiently explained that while he was guaranteeing nothing, he nevertheless felt I might well still qualify.  He told me that Jack Bell, for example, our fellow Chefusian, and a Canadian, had received the payment.

 

Norman insisted on airmailing me the application forms to  fill out.  It still took another year to be approved, but I received the full payment of ten thousand pounds which Her Majesty's Government transfered into my Canadian bank account.  Needless to say, I immediately wrote Norman an e-mail letter thanking him for this great boon which, thanks to his kindly interest had come to help me at the age of seventy-five!

 

I believe there are many, many people around the world who will agree with me that Norman Cliff was truly a great Christian man!

 

Respectfully  submitted

David

G. David Birch

 

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>; <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: "Natasha Petersen" <np57@cox.net>

Objet: Re: Norman Cliff

Date: samedi 19 mai 2007 6:34

 

We, also, send our sympathy to the Cliff family.  He was so gracious in sending me a copy of his book, signed as I requested.  What a great contribution to our collective memories.  A truly great loss.

~Dwight W. Whipple

 

--

De: "Ted Margrett" <yanshida@Yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Last Summer

Date: mercredi 23 mai 2007 4:18

 

Dear Friends,

  It is indeed with great sadness to hear the news of Norman Cliff's death.  However, like a bird in a cage who has been set free, his soul has winged its flight to join his Heavenly Father. 

  

  Last summer, while Mr. Cliff was in Yantai for a short visit, I had the opportunity of intereviewing him in connection with my on-going research into the history of Yantai. The interview, which was videod, took about two hours.  What struck me was his incredible memory.  I had lots of questions that needed to be answered.  I had details that only he could clarify and substantiate.  Patiently and with the utmost courtesy, he set the record straight. Later, along with a local reporter, a few local officials and historians I was able to accompany him on a visit to the Old Mule Road, where he had been born.  Unknown even to local historians,  I had discovered the location of the church belonging to Chefoo Industrial Mission (although it is not called that now, it is a thriving Christian church.) founded Mr. and Mrs. James McMullen, and so our party lkater headed in that direction.  Mr. Cliff was absolutely ecstatic as his photograph was taken in front of the cornerstone

 dedicated to the Glory of God.  Following lunch, hosted by local government officials, he headed back to his hotel for a rest. He had several appointments to keep later that afternoon followed by dinner and more appointments.  As we approached his hotel, he said that what I was doing was wonderful.   That day I had witnessed someone whose life in Chefoo had been re-lived in a short space of time, because our interview, conversations, and subsequent visits to various places had conjured up a myriad increadible memories for him. And for that I will always be grateful. It's one thing to read about history, but it's another to converse with a living breathing maker of history. 

  

  The following day, there was a full-page article, along with several photographs, written about Norman Cliff's visit to the city of his birth.  I know from talking to several of my Chinese friends, Norman Cliff was a famous man, who was born in Chefoo - a great foreigner.  To most of the population, who did not know him, he was a celebrity, but to those who knew him, he was the epitome of all that is good in a human being.

  

  Best regards,

  

  Ted Margrett

  China International Education College

  Yantai China

  

 

      

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Last Summer

Date: mercredi 23 mai 2007 7:07

 

What a great event you describe in Yantai, and what a wonderful thing for Norman to experience.  I have a little inkling of something he must have felt because I, too, visited my birthplace in China a couple of years ago.  I was treated royally, given gifts, etc.  It was a surprise to the city officials that an American would return to his birthplace.  It was touching and memorable.

~Dwight W. Whipple

 

De: "Ted Margrett" <yanshida@Yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Last Summer

Date: jeudi 24 mai 2007 2:05

 

Dear Mr. Dwight Wipple,

  Thank you for your letter. I was very fortunate that Norman Cliff took the time in what was a very busy schedule to spend time with me. Your having been born in China and your return to the place of your birth is extremely interesting, because over the past few years, I have had the opportunity of interviewing a few people who were also born in here. Always, when they talk about it, they become very emotional. One woman, whose mother was a White Russian, who left Russia after the 1917 Revolution, stated that her years in China, the place of her birth, (she now lives in Kentucky) were the happiest of her life. 

  

  Best Regards,

  Ted

 

De: "lucy lu" <lucy9859@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Norman Cliff

Date: vendredi 25 mai 2007 2:56

 

Dear Ms. Cook,

 

Mr. Sui have told me about your email. I’ve been so busy with the work and something in my family. So sorry for my delay to respond you quickly. About the publish of your book in china, I’ve reopted to my boss, but she didn't tell me more. I think maybe she willn't think about it, if she would, maybe only a little amount just for the concerned people.

 

So don't worry about it, if we'll think about it again, I’ll contact you as soon as possible.

 

Best Regards.

 

Lucy

Weifang foreign and overseas Chinese affairs office

 

 

De: "lucy lu" <lucy9859@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Norman Cliff

Date: vendredi 25 mai 2007 3:08

 

We, from Weifang foreign affairs office, from Weifang city, are so sad to get this piece of news. I’d like to pay my great tribute to Mr. Norman Cliff.

 

In 2005, I’ve received him during his trip in Weifang city, from which I till now have a great impression. But it's a pity that he couldn't join us on the occasion to mark the 60th anniversary of the liberation of Weihsien concentration camp.

 

I’ve been planning to pay a visit to him this June, because I'll with a government delegation go to Britain and Europe continent.

 

A great loss for all of us and the weihsien concentration camp.

 

Best wishes to Cliff's family.

 

lucy

 

 

De: "Shude Sui" <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Norman Cliff's Last Visit to Weifang

Date: vendredi 1 juin 2007 18:47

 

The loss of Norman Cliff is so heavy to us. He made a great contribution to the successful reunion of the 60th Anniversary of Weihsien Camp Liberation.

 

With my invitation, after his trip to Yantai(Chefoo), Norman visited Weifang on June 12th to 13th, 2005, his last trip to this city. In Weifang, he visited almost every corner of the Weihsien Camp place, where was being under repaired and constructed preparing for the celebration and reunion.

 

He provided us many historical information and told us many true stories of the Weihsien Camp and internees, which were so valuable and important for us to understand that part of history in exact.

 

He donated many books to the Weihsien Exhibition Center, gave many good suggestions for the opening of Weihsien Camp Exhibition Center and the liberation reunion of August 17, 2005. He also helped me a lot in contacting and finding as many of the Weihsien internees.

 

Fortunately, during his stay in Weifang, he was fully interviewed and pictured by reporters from Weifang TV. Videos and pictures, as well as books and stories of Norman Cliff, are all exhibited in Weihsien Camp Exhibition Center, now and forever.

 

Norman Cliff will always be remembered.

 

Sui Shude - Weifang

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Norman Cliff's Last Visit to Weifang

Date: samedi 2 juin 2007 1:20

 

Dear Friend, Shude Sui,

 

Thank you very much indeed for sharing this important information with us. Although Norman Cliff was several years older than I, we attended the Chefoo School at the same time and I was privileged to know him quite well, both at Yantai and at Weihsien. I lived in the attic of Shadyside Hospital and he lived in a nearby building. I was a member of the Boy Scouts and Norman was active in the leadership of the Scouts. We worshiped together in the Camp's church. I looked up to him and respected him greatly. He was a great source of encouragement and practical help to me, even after the war.

 

I think there are many of us, former prisoners, who also have a lot of respect for you Shude. I had the privilege of meeting you at the 60th anniversary of the liberation, in 2005.

 

Peace to you!

 

David Birch

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: test

Date: samedi 2 juin 2007 9:41

 

Hi Natasha, I got your message all right here in Sydney Australia on the WeiHsien site. Nice to hear from you. We are well here and hope you are too.  Thanks again for giving me the Weishien site in the first place at the re-union in USA where I last saw you.Regards Joyce Bradbury/Cooke

 

  From: Natasha Petersen

  To: weihsien

  Sent: Saturday, June 02, 2007 9:42 AM

  Subject: test

 

 

  This is a test email.  I have been having a problem with getting my emails to Topica/Weihsien.  I did get the email sent by David Birch. I have also written to Topica support.

  Natasha

 

De: <grannydavies@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: test

Date: samedi 2 juin 2007 20:40

 

Evidently no problem gettingfrom you.  Did you know that  Serge Chunehen  died, ?  Got a pone call from his wife(in Australia) at midnight.  He was my first real boyfriend, The war separated us when we were sent to Weihsien.Cancer.

We corresponded all these years, haven’t seen him since 1947.

 

 

 

De: "R. E. Stannard Jr." <restannardjr@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Made in China

Date: dimanche 3 juin 2007 7:20

 

Anyone on this WeiHsien list who is within theater-traveling distance of Seattle next weekend may wish to attend the world premier, at the Seattle International Film Festival, of John Helde's feature-length documentary "Made in China" and his journey into the past of Americans growing up in China -- including his father.

 

He has made extensive use of old film footage and interviews with Americans revisiting scenes of their childhoods.

 

Excerpts from his announcement are appended below.

                                                   Ted Stannard

===John Helde===============

When I set out to understand my American father’s China past, a journey across twenty-first century China becomes an exploration of the meaning of home, what lasts, and what doesn't.

 

I'm excited to announce that MADE IN CHINA will have its world premiere at the 2007 Seattle International Film Festival.  Thanks to all who have helped along the way!

 

John

 

Made in China

Sunday, June 10, 7:30 pm

Neptune Theatre

1303 NE 45th St

Seattle, WA 98105

(206) 781-5755

 

 

2007 Seattle Intl. Film Festival

http://www.seattlefilm.org/festival/film/detail.aspx?id=23158&FID=32

Mailing list for news and updates ~ email info@trythisfilms.com  

More info ~ www.trythisfilms.com

 

 

 

 

De: "Sui Shude - Weifang" <suishude@sohu.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: NBC Olympics to Weihsien Camp

Date: dimanche 3 juin 2007 11:41

 

Quick News From Sui Shude - Weifang:

 

On May 27th 2007, I entertained two story-editors of NBC Olympics, the U.S.-Rights holder of the 2008 Beijing Olympics, and the two gentlemen visited the Weihsien Camp place with my guidance.

 

In contact letter to me, the NBC friends wrote:

"To prepare for next year's Olympic program coverage, we want to learn more about the Scottish runner Eric Liddell, who won the 400-metres at the 1924 Paris Olympics. For research purposes, two people from NBC Olympics are going to Weifang to visit the places where Eric Liddell spent the last part of his life. The two NBC gentlemen from the USA were issued J visas through the Beijing Olympic Media Centre of Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad."

 

So, if the story is selected, topics of Eric Liddell & Weihsien Camp will be put in programs for 2008 Beijing Olympics.

 

April and May 2007, 4 groups/families from the U.S. and the N.Z. have made their special visits to the Weihsien Camp place in Weifang.

 

Sui Shude

 

Translation Dept.

Weifang Foreign & Overseas Chinese Affairs Office

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Weihsien liberator, Jim Hannon

Date: lundi 4 juin 2007 4:37

 

Jim Hannon, one of the six Americans who liberated Weihsien, has recently  suffered two  strokes and is being supported at home with Hospice care.

 

Jim was in good spirits this week when I spoke to him and his wife.   He has regained full use of his speech.  He has been in frail health for  some time.

 

If you have a vivid memory of our euphoria,  our adoration of all  things American, and our giddy celebrations on liberation day -- and if you have  a thank you,  now would be a good time to drop Jim an  "I  remember"   note.

 

His address is:  James J. Hannon,    P.O. Box 1376,  Yucca Valley, CA 92286.

 

In late August, 1945,  when  liberators Major Stanlrey Staiger,  Jim Moore,  Tad Nagaki,  Raymond Hanchulak, and Peter Orlich were  reassigned to start an OSS base in Tsingtao.  Jim Hannon remained in  Weihsien to supervise  evacuation of internees.

 

Mary T. Previte

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien liberator, Jim Hannon

Date: lundi 4 juin 2007 17:13

 

Thank you, Mary, for your faithfulness in keeping in close touch with our liberators. These men were true heroes to us when they dropped from the sky at the end of WWII to set us free from our captors in the concentration camp!

David

 

 

De: <grannydavies@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Weihsien liberator, Jim Hannon

Date: lundi 4 juin 2007 20:29

 

Appreciate your telling  us about Jim Hannon, will drop him a  thinking of you note of cheer  Phyllis Davies

 

 

De: "Natasha Petersen" <np57@cox.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: info?

Date: mercredi 20 juin 2007 1:43

 

Last message received was June 4th.  Has anyone received any since then?

 

This is getting old!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Natasha

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: info?

Date: mercredi 20 juin 2007 10:21

 

Hi Natasha,

This message certainly came through with no problem.  I haven't noticed any problems since that earlier difficulty in getting my messages transmitted.

Thank you for the wonderful service that you are providing all of us Weihsienites!

David

 

De: "lucy lu" <lucy9859@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: A Documentary on Weihsien Camp

Date: vendredi 22 juin 2007 7:56

 

Weifang People’s Government

Shandong Film & TV Production Center

June 22, 2007

 

Dear Friends Related to Weihsien Internment Camp,

 

Entrusted by Weifang People’s Government, Shandong Film & TV Production

Center is making a 5-episode Documentary named “Weihsien Internment Camp”, to put that part of history and the special life of Weihsien internees on screen in complete, and to keep the film a valuable historical record for the people of Weifang and the whole world.

The documentary is mainly focused on true history and life stories of Weihsien internees. We need as much of the kind help and assistance from all Weihsiens internee and families. Now we are collecting bits and drops of your past memories of the special life in Weihsien. And the film production group is also planning an interview visit in August and September, 2007.

It would be highly appreciated if you can spare with us your life stories of the Weihsien internment, by email, and further more, agree the special interview from the film production group to you and your family.

 

E-mail Add for film production of “Weihsien Internment Camp”:

Weihsien-camp@hotmail.com

Contact People: Mr. Shude Sui and Miss. Lucy

 

 

 

De: "william jamieson" <bill.jamieson@talk21.com>

À: <info@weihsien-paintings.org>

Objet: WIlliam & Mary Jamieson Weihsien Camp, 1941 to 1945

Date: samedi 23 juin 2007 23:57

 

Hello,

  

  I was aware that my Grand Parents were interned during the war but I only recently found out that the name of their camp was Weihsien. They were both there from 1941 until they were liberated by the Americans in 1945. My Grandfather was the mining engineer at the coal mine nearby and he worked with his friend and colleague Philippe Walravens, a Belgian national who was the mine manager.

  

  My grandfather died soon after the war (about 1950) but my grandmother lived until 1969 and used to tell me stories of her time in Chine although never liked to say too much about her time in camp. She did however give me two water colour paintings from Chine and I was amazed and so pleased to see that the first water colour on your web site was painted (and signed) by my grandmother.

  

  My father (also William Jamieson) is now 87 and when I rang him to tell him what I had discovered he was so proud. I have printed off a copy of the water colour and will give it to him as soon as I see him. I would love to receive any information about my grandparents if anyone remembers them or to find out if there are any more pictures which my grandmother painted.

  

  Very best regards,

  

  William. S.  Jamieson

 

De: "Leopold Pander" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: "william jamieson" <bill.jamieson@talk21.com>

Cc: <weihsien@topica.com>; "Mary Previte" <mtprevite@aol.com>; "Janette & Pierre @ home" <pierre.ley@pandora.be>

Objet: Re: WIlliam & Mary Jamieson Weihsien Camp, 1941 to 1945

Date: dimanche 24 juin 2007 17:10

 

Dear William,

Many thanks for your message. I don't know where to begin ----

In fact, I'm just a small link (from Belgium) in a world-wide chat list created by Natasha (np57@cox.net   )who was a child when imprisoned by the Japanese during WWII. Go to:   http://lists.topica.com/lists/weihsien/read and do join us. I shall also forward this message to "Topica" --- it will be great to have a new voice amongst us.

In fact, most of us - children - have the same "memory" problem. Our parents never said much about Weihsien-concentration-camp and now that they are almost all gone it's difficult to tell the difference between legend and history. I was lucky to find "Topica" about 7 years ago when I purchased my computer and got connected to the Internet. I was 4 years old in 1945 and suffer of a complete black-out of what happened in Weihsien. Our "liberation-day" followed me as a nightmare --- for many many years after. Even now, I have this "vision" --- but I don't remember the rest. The extraordinary thing is that I found Father Hanquet who is 92 years old now, lives 10 minutes away from where I live in Belgium and told me a lot about Weihsien --- a Catholic priest's point of view. (You can also read his book on my web-site) ---. With the help of my sister Janette, (3 years older than I am), we started with this web-site by gathering all we could about Weihsien --- and the marvellous thing is --- that the www helped me too. Many of the surviving children of Weihsien-Concentration-Camp gave me documents, paintings, sketches, books --- and all sorts to create this web site --- historically correct. I hope you enjoy it.

The Walravens are friends of our family. My father knew them well and - as a banker - did business with the mining companies. The Walravens' made us visit Japan in 1951 - I remember that very well - I was just 10 years old and we drove across the Japanese countryside in a US military jeep with Monique Walravens (at the wheel) and my sister Janette. The parents and Mr and Mrs Walravens were following us in the official car of the Belgian embassy ---. Monique lives in Brussels now.

---

Best regards --- and hope to read you soon ---

Leopold Pander

 

>>From: Donald Menzi <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

>>Reply-To: weihsien@topica.com

>>To: bill.jamieson@talk21.com

>>CC: weihsien <weihsien@topica.com>

>>Subject: A Weihsien Bibliography

>>Date: Sun, 24 Jun 2007 12:39:21 -0700 (GMT-07

>> 

>> 

>>Bill,

>> 

>>Welcome aboard!

>> 

>>Hopefully Leopold's response will lead you to explore his fabulous Weihsien web site at your liesure.  I've copied a somewhat dated bibliography about Weihsien below, though I'm sure you could find the same thing on the "official" Weihsien site.  Many, if not most, of the books listed can be obtained through on-line used book dealers such as http://www.abe.com  , http://www.alibris.com , http://www.powells.com  or http://www.bibliofind.com , not to mention http://www.amazon.com . 

>Those with an asterisk were written by participants in the weihsien@topica.com group, who would be happy to sell you a copy directly, I'm sure.

>> 

>>You can also view a "video" slide show "walking tour" of the Weihsien compound that includes some of your grandmother's paintings, and can download an excellent short summary of life at Weihsien written by Howard Galt, by going directly to www.menzi.org, a "family" web site that I set up to distribute material by and about my own grandparents, who were also Weihsien internees. The "walking tour" will show you precisely where in the camp your grandmother was standing when did the paintings that it includes.

>> 

>>The site also includes a photo-essay of the 60th anniversary celebration of Weihsien's liberation, which includes views of Weihsien buildings that are still there today.

>> 

>>Once again, welcome!

>> 

>>Donald Menzi

>> dmenzi@earthlink.net 

 

>>A Weihsien Bibliography

>> 

>>*Bradbury, Joyce, Forgiven but not Forgotten: Memoirs of a Teenage Girl

>Prisoner of the Japanese in China, New South Wales, Australia, 2000.

>> 

>>Cliff, Norman, Courtyard of the Happy Way, Arthur James Limited, The Drift

>Evesham, United Kingdom, 1977.

>> 

>>De Jaegher, Raymond, and Kuhn, Irene, The Enemy Within, St. Paul

>Publications, Bandra, Bombay, India, 1969.

>> 

>>Gilkey, Langdon, Shantung Compound, The Story of Men and Women Under

>Pressure, Harper & Row, New York, 1966.

>> 

>>*Masters, Pamela, The Mushroom Years ��?A Story of Survival,  Henderson

>House, Placerville, California, 1998.

>> 

>>Michel, David, A Boy���s War, Overseas Missionary Fellowship, Singapore,

>1988.

>> 

>>*Osborne, Frances, Lilla���s Feast ��?A True Story of Food, Love, and War

>in the Orient, Ballantine Books, Random House, New York, 2004.

>> 

>>Power, Desmond, Little Foreign Devil, Pangli Imprint, West Vancouver,

>Canada, 1996.

>> 

>>Scanlan, Patrick J., Stars in the Sky, Trappist Publications, Hong Kong,

>1984.

>> 

>>Tipton, Laurance,  Chinese Escapade, Macmillan & Co. , London, 1949.

>> 

>> 

>> 

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: A Weihsien Bibliography

Date: dimanche 24 juin 2007 23:03

 

Donald:

 

    Several other books include fascinating   chapters or sections that describe life in Weihsien:

 

    A Cross in China -- The Story of My  Mission by Sr. M. Servatia, O.S.F., Cuchullain Publications, Ft.  Wayne, Indiana,

 

    Under His Wings --  The Story of a  China Missionary in Wartime by Mary

Payseur, OMS International

 

    Hungry Ghosts by Mary Taylor  Previte,  Zondervan Publishers  (The chapter on Weihsien  has  also been translated into Chinese by Moses Chu and  published in an  English/Chinese edition called"Song of Salvation at Weihsien Prison Camp."   The whole chaptwer is available on the Weihsien web site.

 

    God Can Be Trusted by Elizabeh  Hoyte Goldsmith,   STL Books, Kingsway

Publications, Eastbourne,  UK

 

    Franciscans in Shantung, China,  1929-1948 by Sister M. Julian Alderson,

O.S.F,  3221 South Lake  Drive, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: The miracle of clothing that didn't wear out

Date: dimanche 24 juin 2007 23:08

 

Today's Sunday School lesson from the book of EXODUS and the Children of Israel's wandering for 40 years in the wilderness reminded me of a lesson our Chefoo teachers taught us in Weihsien:

 

If God could create a miracle that the clothes of the Children of Israel didn't wear out for 40 years of  wandering in the wilderness, then God could surely see that our clothes didn't wear out either.

 

Does anyone else remember this sermon that compared Weihsien and the  Exodus from Egypt?

 

Mary Previte

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Donald Menzi

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2007 11:21 PM

Subject: Re: The miracle of clothing that didn't wear out

 

Mary,

 

So tell us!  Did your clothes not wear out?

 

Donald

De: "georgeanna knisely" <jknisely@paonline.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: The miracle of clothing that didn't wear out

Date: lundi 25 juin 2007 0:05

 

Wopw!  Can we have the sermon comparing Weihsien and the chilrden of Israel - what a great, neat comparison?????  Georgie Knisely

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: The miracle of clothing that didn't wear out

Date: lundi 25 juin 2007 5:53

 

Weihsien was full of miracles.

 

Some of the children had grown more than a foot since our parents   first sent us off to the Chefoo School.  Providing clothes for growing children was going to take a GIANT miracle.  But hadn't the Lord promised: "If God so clothe the grass of the field, shall He not much more clothe you?"

 

Clothes and shoes for us little ones was easy.  We grew into hand-me-downs. 

We patched then patched the patches.  But clothing for the older boys posed a serious problem.  It was the winter of 1944-'45. They were facing the third winter of the war -- with no winter trousers -- until Mrs. Lack, one of our teachers,  had her dream.  In the dream, she was going from mattress to mattress looking for dark blankets  that could be made into winter slacks. 

Blankets for trousers.  Of  course!  Why hadn't she thought of it before?

 

    In the dinner queue -- where hunger heightened contenteousness -- the skeptics started in on Mrs. Lack.

 

    "Trousers of ouf blankets?"

 

    "Blankets, my dear, aren't made of woven fabric.  The seats will be out the first time the boys sit down."

 

    How could they understand that if God had told Mrs. Lack to make trouswers out of blankets, He would make His business to keep the seats in?

 

    But just then, a kindly old stranger interrupted.  "I used to be a tailor in Tientsin," he told Mrs. Lack.   "I'm old and not much good these days, but maybe I could help you cut them  out."

 

    By early December when the thermometer dipped to 17 degrees, the trousers -- hand tailored -- were ready.  Temperatures reached 3 below zero that winter.  At the end of April, when the last snows were  melting, the first boy came to Mrs. Lack.

 

    "May I wear my khaki shorts now?" he asked.

 

    "It's a bit cold now, isn't it?"

 

    "But the seat is splitting in my trousers," he said with an uncomfortable blush.

 

    After five winter months, the first seat had given way.

 

Mary Previte

 

 

 

 

De: "Gay Talbot Stratford" <stillbrk@eagle.ca>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: WIlliam & Mary Jamieson Weihsien Camp, 1941 to 1945

Date: lundi 25 juin 2007 18:02

 

Dear William,

Welcome to the group.

I am wondering if your grandparents lived and worked in Linsi as my parents (the Talbots), If so, we knew them well. Of course we saw them in camp as well, and after the war I spent some time with Mary in Coatbridge. She was a superb knitter, and I treasured a winter hat and mitts that she made for me.

 My father, Sid, died in 1947,and if my memory serves me rightly, Bill had left Linsi for the Uk to join Mary and the family. My husband and I travelled to Europe last year and met the Panders and Jeanette, which was a real pleasure, also Monique Walravens who mentioned her friendship with your family.

My mother, Ida, died a number of years ago ending her days in Canada where the three of us: Peter, Christine, and I, now live.

Best wishes to you and your family,

Gay Talbot Stratford

 

De: "lucy lu" <lucy9859@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: A Weihsien Bibliography

Date: mardi 26 juin 2007 5:10

 

Hello, Donald Menzi

 

I'm so intersted in your family website, but it's a pity that I can't log in. so how can i know about the things on that website?

 

best wishes

 

lucy

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: The miracle of clothes that didn't wear out

Date: mardi 26 juin 2007 15:55

 

    

Dear Mary

 

Yes I vaguely remember it. I remember thinking afterwards that I didn't grow out of my shoes, or wear them out. Of course we kept them for the bitter winters. I have been hearing recently from other internees how their feet were deformed because they had no other shoes, and had to force  them on.

 

When we first went to Weihsien, 1, we were told never to walk barefoot, because there was tetanus in the ground from the Japanes army horses, and 2, they gave us Japanese wooden clogs to wear. We couldn't wear them, and made ourselves sandals from plaited rags, but in the latter years we just went barefoot. I remember walking to Kitchen One in the rain, and squelching through the mud, and there were tiny frogs in it. Do you remember 'the plague of frogs'?

 

Love

Estelle Cliff Horne

 

 

I don't recall the frogs, Estelle, but I remember going barefoot in the summer and almost burning our feet on the ground that was baking hot  in the summer sun.

 

And I remember so well September 11, 1945 -- a rainy day in Shensi province.

 We had been flown out of Weihsien to Si-An the day before.  We four Taylor children were walking through  mud and  ruts   -- holding our precious shoes in our hands -- on our way  to our reunion with our parents after 5 1/2 years of  separation.   After Weihsien, we didn't know if we'd ever see decent shoes again.

 

Mary

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: A Weihsien Bibliography

Date: mardi 26 juin 2007 17:51

 

 

 

Dear Lucy,

 

If www.menzi.org  doesn't work, try the following:

 

http://reced.org/dmenzi/wilders/

 

If that doesn't work, try going to the "Links" page on Leopold Pander's site

 

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/links/indexFrame.htm

 

and click on "The Wilder-Stanley Saga"

 

If none of that works, it means that the site is being blocked for some reason.  I will make you a CD that contains all of the material that is on it and send it to you that way.

 

Let me know what happens.

 

Donald

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Wednesday, July 25, 2007 12:48 PM

Subject: Fw: Reply to your post

 

 

> Hello All,

> On my quest to find out more about the B-24 that flew over Weihsien on August 17, 1945 I got this reply-message from the B-24 web-board. The link: http://www.rshonor.org  will interest many of you --- I think.

> Best regards,

> Leopold

> 

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: <webmaster@mach3ww.com>

> To: <tapol@skynet.be>

> Sent: Wednesday, July 25, 2007 9:17 AM

> Subject: Reply to your post

> 

> 

>> Anonymous replied to your post 'searching for information about ARMORED

>> ANGEL' at the site: B-24 Web Board.  The Url of this forum is

>> http://b24.mach3ww.com/cgi/freethreads/freethreads.pl .  The reply was:

>> 

>> Leopold, Not sure if you still need this, but www.rshonor.org  has many

>> B-24 photographs, although not all are indexed yet.  Hope it might help.

>> 

>> Best,

>> Patrick Lucas

>> 

>

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>; <weihsien@topica.com>; "natasha petersen" <np57@cox.net>

Objet: Re: Fw: Reply to your post

Date: jeudi 26 juillet 2007 20:42

 

 

Leopold,

 

I can probably tell you where the plane was built - Ypsilanti, Michigan, my home town, about 25 miles west of Detroit.  We used to refer to the factory as "the bomber plant" and I remember it well.  As far as I know it was the only place B-24s were made.

 

Donald 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: "Ada" Foxlee or Ada Tomky

Date: jeudi 26 juillet 2007 23:33

 

Hello, Everybody,

Who remembers Ada Foxlee or Ada Tomky from Tientsin? 

Today, I received the attached e-mail letter.  I'm sure we  have Weihsieners from Tientsin who can help Susan Ulrich with this search.   I've suggested that  Susan  join our Weihsien Topica  network.

                 Mary Previte

 

Please pardon my direct correspondence, but  the last 24 hours have been amazing for my wife, Susan. Last weekend, Susan discovered an archive left by her adoptive parents, who were American workers living in Tientsin, China, in 1946.  

 

Susan was adopted at age 9 months from an orphanage in Tientsin.  The paperwork she had seen up to now only provided a name of her birth mother, shown as "Ada" Foxlee.  Thanks to some notes in letters shefound in a storage box she had never explored, and an internet search I helped her  with, we learned yesterday that Ada was in the Weihsien Camp - she's on the list  of internees, with her family.  

 

Ada would have been about 18 or 19 when the camp was liberated ... and Susan (birth papers with adoption materials show her birth name was "Marie Rose Tomky, born on April 17th, 1946, to age 19 mother "Ada Foxlee, also known as Ada Tomky, and an un-named father").

 

During the internet search, we also found your marvelous presentation at the 60th anniversary of the liberation, and it was so moving - remember, that until yesterday Susan had no idea about the link to the camp. Finding the  list of internees, led us to learn that her birth mother spent time with many missionary teachers, including ones of note such as your father and Eric Liddell, and thus may have had an opportunty to hear the Gospel and respond  during that time.  What a wonderful hope!

 

In my feeble attempts to follow leads using the internet today, I found your e-mail address listed among communications from folks who seem to write with knowledge of Weihsien.  We haven't figured out how to join the communication group yet, and so please excuse my contact at your e-mail address.

 

By any chance, as an incredible blessing, do you have any leads on how Susan could learn more about her mother, Ada Foxlee, or her aunt, Nina Mary Foxlee.

 

Thanks, so much.

 

Tom Ulrich

202-502-1557

 

 

 

De: "Fred & Coral Dreggs" <adreggs@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re:

Date: samedi 28 juillet 2007 21:03

 

Dear Joyce,

 

I would like to attend the meeting with Lucy Lu when she comes to Sydney.

 

 In due course please let me know when you have a firm date and the location of the meeting.

 

 My wife Coral will be joining me.

 

Kind regards

 

Alfie

  ----- Original Message -----

  From: Joyce Cook

  To: weihsien@topica.com

  Sent: Monday, July 23, 2007 11:40 AM

 

 

  Dear WeiHsieners. As you may know Lucy Lu and her colleagues from Weifang are preparing a documentary on the WeiHsien Civilian Assembly Centre and she has informed me that in the next six months or so she will be visiting me in Sydney, Australia to obtain information about the Camp  and quote, "To make our visit more efficient we  wish to meet more people, would you like to have more people get together and involved in our interview"  She also mentionerd "or their relatives" to collect information in preparation for the documentary.  In order to determine how many persons would be available could you indicate whether you would participate. Regards Joyce Bradbury.

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: "Ada" Foxlee or Ada Tomky

Date: dimanche 29 juillet 2007 0:47

 

Dear Friends --

 

At first I wasn't going to reply to this message, but after reading it through carefully I found it full of strange suppositions.

 

Ada Foxlee, a friend of mine, was British. Her father was the headmaster at the Tientsin Grammar School, and later, in Weihsien, he headed our school there. Her Russian mother taught ballet, and although I knew her little sister Nina, she wasn't in our age bracket. When in Tientsin, Ada's family attended All Saints Church where the Reverend Sims Lee was pastor. All Saints was Anglican, the High Church of England, (the equivalent of the Episcopal Church here in the U.S.) They were a very close and loving family, and Susan should be thrilled to know they were held in great esteem.

 

As I attended St. Joseph's convent in Tientsin, I am certain there are fellow students at TGS who could give Susan a much broader picture of her lovely mother, Ada Foxlee-Tomky.

 

Pamela Masters

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: A Weihsien Bibliography

Date: dimanche 29 juillet 2007 1:55

 

 

Hello, Lucy,

 

I have fixed the web site so that the videos actually run now.  If you go to www.menzi.org , click on "Weihsien" then click on the "Walking Tour" link, you we be able to view the video "tour" of Weihsien, with background music that starts after the introductory frames.

 

Let me know when you have tried it and tell me if it works for you.

 

Best wishes.

 

Donald.

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: "Ada" Foxlee or Ada Tomky

Date: dimanche 29 juillet 2007 9:56

 

I remember Ada Foxlee well. I think she was my age. I was born in 1928. Very quiet and rather shy.She was a lovely person and had a boy friend whose name I cannot remember. I was not a personal friend of hers but we smiled and greeted each when our paths crossed. I was from Tsingtao and she was from Tientsin and I did not know her before Camp. I was 5'7" tall and she was maybe half an inch shorter. She was very good looking with large eyes and a pleasant personality. I did not see her after camp. Best wishes, Joyce Bradbury (formerly Cooke) -----

 

De: "Marjorie Bull" <m.bull@sympatico.ca>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: "Ada" Foxlee or Ada Tomky

Date: mercredi 1 août 2007 6:51

 

Our family Iived in Tientsin before we moved to Chefoo in about 1938.  I knew both Ada and her sister Nina. I seem to remember that her father was the headmaster at the Tientsin Grammar School which we attended. 

  In Chefoo we went to the CIM School and then in Weihsien my brother, Philip, and I were housed in the dormitories with the school as there was not room for us with my parents and sister. Two of my friends there were Joyce Kerry and Dorothy Andrews.

  Maejorie McLorn (now Bull)

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Fred & Coral Dreggs

To: Ex-Weihsien internees

Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2007 9:40 AM

Subject: "Ada" Foxlee

 

 

I was very well acquainted with Ada during the years 1940 to 1946 and her parents a further 2 years, in the UK. Pre -Weihsien my family and I lived in Chinwangtao, North China but I went to Tientsin to study at the Grammar School. It was there that I was in the same Form as Ada, I being 14 years old and she 8 months younger. Her father George Foxlee was our Maths and Science teacher. He was the Deputy Headmaster. When war broke out and we were interned  I resumed my acquaintance with her and our studies continued under George Foxlee when he was the de facto Headmaster of the so-called “Weihsien Grammar School” In the period that I had known her I found her to be a lovely lass, good tempered  and very friendly.

 

 In my last year in school I was extremely keen on mathematics. Mr. Foxlee spent a great deal of time with me after school and taught me higher mathematics beyond the then current curriculum. I also visited Mr. And Mrs. Foxlee at their home in London where the family was staying with who I believe were Mrs. Foxlee’s  relatives.

(Before we left camp Mr. Foxlee gave me his future temporary address so that I could call and arrange getting my matric. Papers etc. I was extremely grateful and regarded my mentor very, very highly. He was a terrific person and all I can say is that Susan should be happy to know that she is a descendant of a very nice and highly regarded family. Young Nina was there too but I hardly knew her as she was about 5/6 younger than I.

 

There are 2 important matters that Susan may not be aware of but they may be of  great interest to her:

 

Firstly, her grandmother, Nina Arvidovna Foxlee was a Russian lady which would make Ada half Russian and Susan quarter Russian by blood. (It so happens that I too am half Russian and proud of it) Ada’s given name was ‘Adula’ a Russian name as is ‘Nina’

 

Secondly, it seems Susan does not know who may be her biological father. I will now digress slightly.

In camp Ada’s steady boyfriend was John Marshall who was also in our class in Tientsin. He went around with her for most of our stay in camp but they broke up. John then had another girlfriend and Ada became friendly with an older man. A batchelor (but maybe a widower)

We now know from her husband Tom Ulrich that Susan was born on 17/4/46 which, by my calculation, would seem that she conceived around 1 month before liberation. .  Therefore, her father had to be an internee. I am aware who that person was but I do not wish to divulge that name via the Topica site. Mary, if you think it is appropriate to take this further, I am prepared to write to your private email address when you can judge how my knowledge was gained. Please let me know as I am in two minds as to what to do given that Ada appears to have decided not to have the father’s name entered in the papers .  I would not want to upset her. Ada must now be around 80 years old. I would love to know if she is alive and well.

 

Sincerely,

 

Alfie (aka Fred) Dreggs

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: August 17, 1945

Date: lundi 6 août 2007 2:32

 

Hello, Everybody:

 

Liberation Day is approaching with another opportunity to thank the heroes who liberated us from Weihsien.

 

Only two of those American liberators are still alive.  If you'd like to drop them a note of appreciation, here are their addresses. Tell them your memories of that glorious day.  They tell me they keep these letters and cards in boxes to enjoy over and over again.

 

James J. Hannon, P. O. Box  1376,  Yucca Valey, CA 92286,   USA

 

Tad Nagaki,  5851 Logan Road, Alliance, NE  69301,   USA

 

Mary Previte

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Where were you when the American liberators came?

Date: lundi 6 août 2007 2:56

 

Hello, Everybody,

 

Let's celebrate Liberation Day, August 17, 1945, with memories:  Where were you and what were you doing when the American liberators  parachuted from the Armored Angel to liberate Weihsien?

 

I'll collect your memories and forward them to our liberators or to their widows.

 

Mary Previte

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: re 1945 leaflet

Date: lundi 6 août 2007 3:15

 

Eddie:

 

Can you find someone to scan the leaflet for everyone to see on our  Weihsien Topica network?

 

Mary Previte

 

De: "georgeanna knisely" <jknisely@paonline.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Where were you when the American liberators came?

Date: lundi 6 août 2007 4:45

 

August 17 was my best friend in camp's birthday, Wies de Jongh.  And we were grinding peanuts, making peanut butter in their front yard.   The plane came over low and then lower and we saw the US insignia and then the pilot and copilot.  I remember the Salvation Army band playing God bless America and the British singing God save the King.  I remember the colorful parachutes red, yellow and blue, coming down and everybody screaming once again when they started realizing that they were people.  What a day!  Has to be the most exciting day in my life.  I have had a wonderful, blessed life.  BUT that was something and the best!  I was 12 years old.  Georgie (Reinbrecht) Knisely

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: re 1945 leaflet

Date: lundi 6 août 2007 8:27

 

Hello,

the leaflet is in Norman's chapter --- click on this link:

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/NormanCliff/escape/p-AlliedPrisonners.htm

(and click again on the picture to see the other leaflet --- the one that came in English on one side and Dutch on the other side ---)

--- if that doesn't work, click on the attachment coming with this message ---

My thoughts will be with us all --- on the 17th --- Thank you America ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Gay Talbot Stratford" <stillbrk@eagle.ca>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Where were you when the American liberators came?

Date: mardi 7 août 2007 21:03

 

georgie

I remember precisely the same scene. Being with Wies and looking at her birthday presents, when the planes flew low that day. Thankyou for the reminder.So glad that your life has been blessed. Please tell Wies that I do intend to write. May God continue his care of you.

In friendship,

Gay Talbot Stratford

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Sui Shude

Date: mercredi 8 août 2007 2:40

 

News has reached me that Sui Shude has suffered a heart attack.  Mr.  Sui was host and interpreter for our magnificent 2005 60th anniversary  celebration in Weifang.

 

Mary Previte

 

 

De: "Mary Broughton" <maryhbroughton@swissmail.org>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: August 17, 1945

Date: mercredi 8 août 2007 11:05

 

My memory is of being in class.  Hearing the plane, so different to the sound of the rare Japanese plane that flew over.  We all rushed outside looking up.  As it circled we ran in circles under it.  Then it started to climb higher, thinking it was going away we stopped and wailed, only to find to our joy there were soon parachutes gently floating down with men attached. So we rushed to the gate and carried on through for the first time ever.  I confess I didnt go very far as there were so many prickles attacking my bare feet.  I was certainly part of the reception back at the gateway.  Then we followed with the crowd to stand outside the Headquarters building where Major Steiger spoke to us all. It wasnt long before we learnt 'You are my sunshine' and every morning at 6am they played over loud speakers 'Oh what a beautiful morning, Oh what a wonderful day' regardless of the weather.

Mary (Hoyte) Broughton

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Date: vendredi 10 août 2007 3:01

 

To Sui Shude.  On behalf of my family and me I wish you a successful operation and speedy recovery. We will never forget your kindness and hospitality during our visit at the Re-Union. Joyce. George, Tom, Bill and Danielle Bradbury.

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Memories of August 17, 1945 from Ted Pearson, Canada

Date: vendredi 10 août 2007 19:03

 

 

I remember seeing the B-24 fly over and the crates and drums falling from the bombays and the 'chutes never opening.  Then I remember the 7 jumped from the B-24.  The parachutes came down so evenly spaced.  They were like steps in a staircase.  Somehow everyone ran out of the gates.  Being small and fast

– 10 years old -- I was way ahead of everyone.  I was barefoot and wore shorts.  I ran to the nearest parachute that I saw land and came upon this man in uniform who had his glasses taped to his temples.  He was already disconnected from his 'chute when I arrived.  We were in a field of stubble – maybe gaoliang.   Anyhow, he pointed to some Chinese writing which was printed on his uniform. 

I said to him ''I'm sorry, Sir, I don't know how to read Chinese''.  

He was amazed. ''You speak English?''  

''I'm from the camp, Sir”, I said. “We burst the gates''. 

Then the adults showed up, and I was pushed aside.  

Ted Pearson, Canada

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Donald Menzi

To: weihsien@topica.com ; weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, August 10, 2007 10:32 PM

Subject: Re: Memories of August 17, 1945 from Ted Pearson, Canada

 

Ted and all,

it's wonderful to read these memories of that day from those of you who were there. Even though I wasn't, it still almost brings tears to my eyes picturing it from your vivid descriptions. 

Donald

De: "Dwight W. Whipple" <thewhipples@comcast.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Memories of August 17, 1945 from Ted Pearson, Canada

Date: samedi 11 août 2007 1:16

 

Same for me. We were repatriated in September 1943 but I still remember where I was when the Asian war was over in August 1945.  As a kid, I often wished that we could have stayed "until the end" rather than leaving mid-war.  But the choice wasn't ours.

~Dwight

 

4728A Lakeshore Lane SE

Olympia, WA 98513

360.456.4300

thewhipples@comcast.net

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Photo of delirious prisoners welcoming American liberators

Date: samedi 11 août 2007 8:50

 

Yes! of course --- :-)

This famous picture is in Norman's chapter, --- go to "liberation day" --- click here for the short-cut:

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/NormanCliff/liberationDay/p-liberation.htm

--- it is really thanks to Ron Bridge that we have that photo --- the best one of the whole web-site ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: tapol@skynet.be

Sent: Saturday, August 11, 2007 1:39 AM

Subject: Photo of delirious prisoners welcoming American liberators

 

 

Leopold,

 

Is there some way to make easily accessible on your web site this week the amazing photo of the tumultuous crowd welcoming the Americasn heroes into Weihsien?

 

Can you tell folks how to find it?

 

Mary

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Where were you when the American liberators came?

Date: samedi 11 août 2007 17:34

 

I remember that it was a bright day --- it must have been a cloudless blue sky over Weihsien. I was 4-years old wandering all alone on a grassless slope of dirty brown soil. I was next to a big rock --- as big as I was. I felt lost – completely lost. Grown-ups running all over the place. In my memory, I remember that all was silent --- very silent. Somebody picks me up --- .

 

--- And then I wake up in the middle of the night.

 

I had this dream for many – many years and finally found out that it was the day that the Americans liberated us on 17th August 1945.

 

――

 

I don’t have that nightmare anymore but the image is indelibly printed in my neurones. Two years ago, when we visited Weifang and the old Weihsien hospital I think I recognized the brown earth slope going downwards towards the river. Alone and with my digital camera I started walking upstream towards what had been the Weihsien main gate and walls beyond the compound. I think that it is there that I was lost – 62 years ago. I was then politely and firmly invited to rejoin our group of visitors waiting near the hospital grounds.

 

Once again, I woke up ――――

 

 

 

Leopold

 

De: "Alison Holmes" <aholmes@prescott.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Where were you when the American liberators came?

Date: samedi 11 août 2007 20:52

 

How lovely to read your message, Leopold!  We have all written our memories (probably more than once) over the lifetime of the website but I think this is the first time I have heard yours, and love the way it speaks to what gets written on our nerve endings, in our souls, in our subconscious.  Those early happenings reverberate through our lives at all sorts of levels.  Our visit to Weihsien was interesting, delighted recognition and exploration, until the moment we were standing in the middle school (the site of Block 23) looking out of the office window and seeing home.  It was actually not block 15 which had been pulled down, but the block behind it, but instantly my sister and I were in tears, shaking with having been transported back in time, seeing the castor oil plants that Ma (Heather Martin) had planted outside the door, seeing through our tears the bright blue of the morning glories, seeing the little outdoor stove.  And yes, we too stood on the field and looked up into the sky and re-peopled it with tiny figures dangling below great colourful parachutes. We are made up of memories that we recreate in dreams, in visions, in work, and I'm sure that given such richness of experience we are furnished with material that once we recognize it, once we wake up to it at different levels, once we understand it, it and we are able to become part of a larger world.  I, too, have had my China dreams that I no longer need to keep pulling me back but have released me to embrace the future with greater delight. But I still honour August 17th, often with a Hershey bar (which I never eat any other time, too sickly sweet) and my thoughts go to all who were a part of that day, liberators, camp inhabitants, Chinese neighbours.  So thank you again, Leopold! 

Alison

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fwd: Susan is talking with Nina Foxlee Baird as I type this ...

Date: dimanche 12 août 2007 23:17

 

Thank you to so many of you who have helped with this miracle.

 

Mary Previte

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Thomas_Ulrich@ao.uscourts.gov

To: undisclosed-recipients:

Sent: Friday, August 10, 2007 5:46 PM

Subject: Susan is talking with Nina Foxlee Baird as I type this ...

 


Dear friends ...

It has been an incredible two weeks!  As I type this, Susan is on the phone with Ada's sister, Nina Foxlee (now Mrs. Baird), in England.  God's provision in the form of so many amazing details shared by Weihsien Camp folks who kept in touch, as well as those of you have already helped with this search, has been truly a blessing.  Thank you!

Everyone's information has been encouraging and useful ... you may be interested that the pivotal piece that has led to us finding Nina was something only God could do.  Desmond Power (who has been particularly helpful with research) sent me an e-mail this morning, saying that yesterday (yes - 1 day ago) he got a card from an old friend thanking him for some books he had sent her, that included a PS saying "I was delighted to get in touch with ... Nina Foxlee."  With Desmond's help and via the internet, I found a telephone number and called Nina about an hour ago.

This is only a beginning!  We are eager to learn more and more, and we thank everyone and look forward to meeting you Weihsien folks online and, perhaps, in person.

Blessings to all!

Tom and Susan Ulrich

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: from Edinburgh, Scotland, HERALD,  August 12, 2007

Date: lundi 13 août 2007 5:53

 

 

 

 

Has anyone ever heard of this?

 

Did Eric Liddell turn down freedom to help another prisoner-of-war?

_DOUG  GILLON, Athletics Correspondent_ (mailto:doug.gillon@theherald.co.uk) 

August 11  2007

 

 

 

It was a typically selfless act. Eric Liddell, the iconic Scottish Olympic athletics champion, turned down an offer of liberation by Winston Churchill from a wartime internment camp in China in favour of another prisoner, it was claimed  yesterday.

Simon Clegg, chief executive of the British Olympic Association, and elite performance director Sir Clive Woodward were laying a wreath on Liddell's grave in Weifang when they were told about the move by Chinese officials. Weifang, in  Shandong Province, was used by the Japanese to intern many foreign and Chinese  prisoners.

The pair are in China for the pre-Olympic regatta, and were taking the opportunity to honour the 1924 Olympic 400 metres champion who gave up athletics and a promising career as a Scotland rugby winger to become a missionary in China. He had been born there and his parents also served there as missionaries.

Mr Clegg said: "We had lunch with the vice-mayor of Weifang and some of her colleagues. I was told by a senior official that Eric was given the opportunity of being exchanged while he was still alive, and he turned it down in favour of someone else.

"If that's the case, it's entirely in keeping with the way he led the rest of his life. Talk about a role model - someone who had achieved so much in the sporting environment and then effectively to walk away from that, not for any personal advancement, but to devote his life to working with other people.

He really is an inspiration to us all.

"What was said related to Winston Churchill arranging a prisoner swap, but Eric let somebody else go in his place. It would be hard to substantiate the details now, but the Chinese are not known for elaborating in this way."

Liddell died of a brain tumour in February 1945, just months before liberation. His grave was marked with a plain wooden cross, his name written in boot polish. However, on the 60th anniversary of the internment camp a memorial park was built, and in 1991 a one-ton block of Mull granite was erected on 

Liddell's grave.

"It's in a quiet and very dignified setting of a courtyard," added Mr Clegg. 

"We laid a wreath of brightly-coloured local flowers there, on behalf of the BOA and athletes past, present, and future.        I hadn’t realised just what an outstanding human being he was  

"Torrential rain fell before and after the ceremony, but there was a glorious break in the weather when we were at the memorial. There is still an old missionary building, which during internment had a hospital on the second floor, offices on the ground floor, and accommodation units on the third. It's in the  courtyard of this building that the memorial stands.

"There's also a small museum to the internment camp. Liddell does feature, both in terms of his athletics prowess and contribution to the camp and society.  There's a log book with his name, Liddell, EH, and a reference to where he was accommodated in the camp.

"The people of Weifang have done a fantastic job in terms of keeping his spirit alive today. I hadn't realised just what an outstanding human being he was. It was quite emotional being there."

The Chinese are making a documentary about the internment camp, and have interviewed survivors as old as 103. This will also feature Liddell, because of the role he played in the camp, and they are coming to the UK to research and film.

Numerous biographies of Liddell have made no mention of a prisoner exchange. 

His late sister, Jenny Somerville, never spoke of it, nor did his daughter, Patricia, who accepted Liddell's induction to the Scottish Athletics Hall of Fame two years ago. An attempt to contact her at her home in Canada last night was unsuccessful.

Bob Rendall, chief executive of the Eric Liddell Centre in Edinburgh, said: "I have been in this job 12 years and have never heard any mention of it, either from the family or in print, but there are always secret papers being released."

Two other films are currently being made. Caithness-based screenwriter Murray Watts has collaborated in one of these, being made by Toronto-based Windborne  Productions.

"Funding is still being put in place, but we look like going into pre-production at the end of next month with Bruce Beresford as director," said a spokeswoman.

Beresford won four Oscars with Driving Miss Daisy. David Puttnam's Chariots of Fire, which featured Liddell's life as an athlete, won five.

A life more worthy of a film than Chariots of Fire

 

THE life Eric Liddell had after the Chariots of Fire era may prove more worthy of a film than the athletic achievements which Ian Charleson famously portrayed. Liddell, who gained seven rugby caps on the wing for Scotland before winning Olympic gold and silver in 1924, was carried shoulder high down the platform of Edinburgh's Waverley Station when he turned his back on sport for the glory of God, as a missionary in China.

He risked his life, smuggling money for church work, hidden in bread, or tending typhoid victims.

A man whose execution the Japanese had bungled lay dying in a derelict temple. Fearing reprisals, nobody would go to him, until Liddell rescued him on a handcart.

Another man was cleft from the back of his head to his mouth, and left for dead. Liddell ferried both 18 miles to a hospital. Both recovered.

Many Britons were interned when the Sino-Japanese war erupted, Liddell among them. He had sent his pregnant wife to Canada for safety, in 1941. He died without ever seeing his third daughter.

Inmates of the camp included the elderly, children separated from their parents, a touring jazz band, and a white Russian prostitute.

The Edinburgh University BSc wrote a chemistry book for the camp children, inscribing the cover: "The bones of Inorganic Chemistry. (Can these dry bones live?)"

One lad, David Mitchell, became a minister, and wrote a book on his childhood. He recalled Liddell mixing glue from fish bladders and scales, mending hockey sticks, and doing so by night, to spare inmates the smell.

The man who had declined on Sabbatarian grounds to run the 100m at the Olympics, refereed youngsters' football on Sundays. He mixed coal dust with clay to make crude briquettes for the elderly, and when the prostitute was ostracised by other women, he rigged a shelf for her. She said he was the only man to do her a favour without seeking other favours in return.

When he died on February 16, 1945, the camp was devastated. He had seemed invincible. The kids whom he had walked with earlier were the cord bearers at his burial in the snow of north China.

 

© All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without _permission_

(mailto:rights@glasgow.newsquest.co.uk)  is prohibited.

 

 

De: "Ron Bridge" <rwbridge@freeuk.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: from Edinburgh, Scotland, HERALD,  August 12, 2007

Date: mardi 14 août 2007 19:31

 

I think that I can shed some light on this.

1. Eric Liddell is listed as not having ever applied for evacuation in the Swiss Consular records for Weihsien Camp.

2. When the second evacuation was being planned for US and Canadians in September 1943 there was also correspondence regarding doing an exchnage for UK British but it was abandoned when it was found that there were insufficient Japanese living in UK or UK colonial territory to do a swap. Remember for every Canadian released to Canada  a Japanese resident in Canada was exchanged and the same thing happened with the US. In the first exchange in August 1942 which was largely diplomatic and quasi diplomatic staff through Lournco Marques the numbers were not so precise as it was a diplomatic "thing".

3 However Eric Liddell's wife  Flo had not gone back to Tientsin after their 1940 home leave  which ahd begun in Scotland and went to live in Toronto with their children and as Eric Liddell's  next of kin had a Canadian Address he would have briefly been listed as Canadian and hence eligible for exchange evacuation. His passport was definitely British ( issue by Brfitish Consulate Teitnsin in January 1937) thus I am of the considered opinion from the research that I have done that the fact that he was consdiered for exchange was based on incomplete knowledge of the facts above rumour and surmise.

Rgds

Ron Bridge

 

De: "rod miller" <rmmiller@optusnet.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: New book in Australia

Date: mercredi 15 août 2007 19:57

 

 

A new book has been published about Australian civilians interned by the Japanese.

I haven't read it as yet but it got some publicity on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation network tonight.

It may be of interest to some of you.

They have made the interview with the author available on its web site.

 

http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2007/s2004645.htm

 

Regards

Rod

 

De: "Albert de Zutter" <albertarthur@sbcglobal.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: from Edinburgh, Scotland, HERALD,  August 12, 2007

Date: jeudi 16 août 2007 7:42

 

Ron,

  

  Thank you for your factual input.

  

  The original email was headed "Has anyone ever heard of this?" And my answer is "No." If anything like this ever happened the whole camp would have known about it. Obviously the story was not well researched, as it states that Weifang "was used to intern many foreign and Chinese prisoners." While there were people of Chinese descent in the camp, there were no Chinese prisoners per se in the camp.

  

  This is a typical instance of trying to add to the legend of Eric Liddell. I almost fell out of my chair when I read "It would be hard to substantiate the details now, but the Chinese are not known for elaborating in this way."

  

  The Chinese have refurbished Eric Liddell's tomb (?)/ monument, made a movie, etc., precisely because of the upcoming Olympics. It is public relations for them. So it would be hard not only to substantiate the "details," but the substance appears to be made of whole cloth. The story's testimonial to Chinese veracity is based on wishful thinking.

  

  The legend of Eric Liddell needs NO elaboration from Chinese publicists.

  

  Albert de Zutter

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: from Edinburgh, Scotland, HERALD,  August 12, 2007

Date: jeudi 16 août 2007 11:03

 

Five years already that I am busy adding historical facts, documents, paintings, sketches, books, etc ... to the Weihsien Paintings Web Site --- I could not - not answer to Mary's mail about this story --- legend -

I did write an answer but hesitated to send it on "Topica" --- I thought that I was not very diplomatic ---

Well,   here is the text:

---

This article written by Doug Gillon ―――. "They" are building a legend around the person of Eric Liddell ---

 

I doubt that Mr. W. Churchill, in those difficult days, had time to arrange for the repatriation of a Scottish missionary prisoner of the Japs, even if he be a famous Olympic runner. I would like to see the official documents justifying that.

 

The article mentions: "and in 1991 a one-ton block of Mull granite was erected on Liddell's grave".  This monument is arbitrarily erected between block-59 and the hospital and is certainly not on top of Eric's grave as affirmed.

 

Eric's grave is elsewhere.

 

Exactly at the same place where he was buried in 1945 which is plot 59 as mentioned on the map Norman showed to me. Go to: http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/NormanCliff/people/individuals/Eric01/p_grave.htm   

 

 

 

In conclusion I'd like to say that "History" is slowly becoming "Legend" and even if it is for the benefit of the 2008 Olympic Games it is unfair not to tell the truth.

---

Best regards,

 

Leopold

 

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Barbara "Dickie" Cameron

Date: jeudi 16 août 2007 17:24

 

Does anyone know how to connect with Barbara "Dickie" Cameron, one of the Tientsin  group?

 

Mary Previte

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Eileen Bazire's memory of Liberation Day

Date: jeudi 16 août 2007 23:53

 

 

From Peter Bazire, Bath, U.K.

 

Late in her life my mother wrote an account of her life for her

grand-daughter, and the 17-08-1945 story comes from this  account.

 

"One morning in August 1945 there was suddenly an air of excitement in the camp.

'Quick, come outside', called an internee, 'people are all getting together and looking at something'.

Sure enough the sound of a plane became louder as it neared the camp!

Everyone had by now stopped work and was looking at the sky.To our wonder and joy a man parachuted down followed by six others, landing near the front gate. I shall never forget that moment. The thrill of knowing that the war was over, the knowledge that we were no longer prisoners, the thought of reunion  with our loved ones, the sudden excitement was almost too much for some of us. I had an indescribable feeling in the pit of my stomach, never before or since experienced.

We all rushed out through the main gate, watched by a gaping guard to greet the airmen. One of them had been a prefect at Chefoo and was recognised at once by staff and former school mates.

Other planes dropped leaflets and tinned foods which many of us were unable to take; even fruit juice was too rich for me as we never had any fruit in camp rations. Delicious food was now served in the kitchens, but I begged to be allowed to eat in the diet kitchen where the fare was much the same  as usual.

Services of thanksgiving were held in the church, full of praise and thanksgiving and joy."

                                                                             

   -- Eileen Bazire, Bath, U.K. 

 

On on Liberation Day, Mrs. Bazire was age 43.   A teacher at the Chefoo

Schools, she was an artist and musician, responsible for creating posters announcing cultural events in  Weihsien, transcribing music,  and  for scheduling piano practice for  those who wished to practice the piano.  Many of her drawings, water  colors, and posters are now displayed in the Weihsien Exhibit building.

 

 

 

De: "Anthony Hamins" <anthony.hamins@nist.gov>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Where were you when the American liberators came?

Date: vendredi 17 août 2007 0:19

 

As I recall...  It was August 16. Our dear friend Arthur Wright, a scholar of Asian culture, noticed that the Japanese guards were at attention listening to the Commandant, in a posture that indicated to him that an imperial decree was being read. Arthur suspected that something very important was happenning. So, the four of us, Arthur, his wife Mary (a scholar in her own right), my husband Boris, and I, decided to see if the Swiss Counsel was going to arrive - a possible scenario if the War was over.  We grabbed chairs and decided to sit at the Heavenly Gate awaiting news.  We were there for hours, until late afternoon.  We decided to celebrate the end of the War and our liberation that evening.

 

I went to cook dinner for the four of us.  To garnish the contents of a can of salmon, I decided to make mayonaise.  During this rather laborious process, I heard the annoucement that we were to gather on the field as the Commandant had an annoucement.  As I didn't want to ruin the mayonaise, I stayed in my compound while everyone gathered in the field.  My husband reported that the Commandant said, "there are rumors that the War is over. I will neither confirm nor deny it."  And did we celebrate that night!

 

The next day, while cleaning our room,  my husband suddenly rushed in and said that an American plane was flying overhead.  I didn't want to interupt my task, but my husband started screaming that parachutists were dropping, so I ran with the rest of the crowd to the gate, which was open - so we ran to the field towards the Americans.  One of them,

Moore, recognized my husband from when they attended the University of California at Berkeley together. It was an unexpected class reunion.

 

Judith Hamins

Chevy Chase, Maryland

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: liberation day

Date: vendredi 17 août 2007 1:06

 

 

 

 

Dear all,

Peter Bazire just sent me a few pages of his diary-book to go on the Weihsien-paintings-web-site. Here it is "en avant première" ---

This IS history ---

Peter was 14 years old in 1945,

 

Best regards,

Leopold

PS two pages missing because message too big (<100Kb)

---

Wednesday, August 15th

 

During the afternoon and evening rumours were going around camp that war had finished.

 

In the evening, Mr. Mc Laren read out in front of the discipline office that the Japanese emperor had ordered that no more firing should be.

 

The Japs neither confirmed nor denied this statement.

 

In the evening there was a game of softball Chefoo v Weihsien (We from Chefoo, who arrived in Camp after others, referred to our opponents on the sports field as 'Weihsien', i e those who came from Peking, Tientsin, etc.) in which Chefoo won. ― good celebration for supposed to be victory. I played A.F.

 

Thursday, August 16th

 

Around midday rumours went around that war was over. There were crowds near the front gate all talking away.

 

Soon the crowd dispersed and the people discussed the end of the war and what they would do.

 

About 8:20 p.m. a car arrived at the front gate. People came from all directions to see who was in it. It turned out to be a couple Japs. It was about the first car we had seen for a long time.

 

Friday, August 17th

 

Everybody was exited and couldn't settle down. We, of course dug into our stores more than usual. After morning roll-call, about 9:30 we heard a plane. Everybody rushed out and we found out that it was American. Occasionly foriegn (sic) planes had flown over but this was the first to fly low. It came from S-W. It flew E. of the camp and we could see the star. It had 4 engines and was a B-24. We all waved and cheered although they told us after that they didn't see us. It came over again and flew from S-N over the camp very low, about 40 feet. It almost touched the trees. Then it circled around and flew N-S, but what thrilled us all was that it dropped parachute troops. 7 in all.

 

Major Staiger

 

Lieut. J. Moore (Chefoo senior)

 

Lieut. Hannen

 

Sgt. Ray Hanchulack

 

Cpl. Tad Nagaki (naturalised Jap-American)

 

Cpl. Peter Orlick

 

Edward Wong. (Chinese)

 

We all rushed out of camp to help them in. They dropped in dull white silk parachutes. All they had to do was to turn a thing and press it and they were released from the parachute. They hid behind grave mounds because when they had started out war hadn't finished. It was a mistake what we had heard on Thursday. We yelled in English to them and they realised that they were safe then showed themselves. I was one of the first to come across. E. Wong. They had .45 colts by their hips and .32 up near their left shoulders. We were half a mile from camp amongst kao-liang and millet. The plane was 600 ft. up when they dropped. The plane zoomed over again and in its bomb racks it had big metal containers about 4' high and over a foot wide slightly rounded at each end. We carried them to a general dump by a grave. They were dropped with parachutes. The plane came again and dropped a few more and after that circled once more and flew W very close to the kao-liang and went for ever that day. The plane also ----

 

We then went in search for the supply containers. Some were'nt found for quite a time. We had 4 men to a container and another carried the parachute. The brought out the reserve gang cart out and dumped a good deal of the stuff on that. I thought the whole thing was over when Hoyte III asked me to come with him. A feeble minded police tried to stop us but we told him that were doing good work so he let us go on. We carried a big basket affair which contained radio parts. We ran all the way.

 

The band was playing and they had brought my trumpet. Since we children were not allowed out again I played in the band. The Chungking troops were outside our front gate when the P. troops landed to protect them and us.

 

The major was about the last to come of everybody, and was carried by a couple of men. Everybody cheered.

 

The Americans went to the Administration building in Moon Gate.and talked with the big-shots of the camp. E. Wong talked to us through the window. He was in Peking 7 years ago but escaped from school and went to high school and then joined up. It was the first time he had jumped from an airplane. He is called "Shorty" because of his height (about 5')

 

When the soldiers came out children flocked towards them, especially Nagaki. He is always seen walking around with children.

 

These parachute troops were picked men. When they landed they didn't know, whether Japs or communists, who were numerous, would attack them for the war isn't over yet. They were brave men. The Japs were feeling funked (sic)(The word 'funked' was used widely by some of us then. Meaning 'afraid', scared') and couldn't stop us so the Americans came in safe.

 

Some invalids were told to prepare 1 suit-case ― no more than 50 lbs. in case they would go that day. They didn't.

 

 

 

End of page ―

 

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: A collection of memories of Liberation Day, August 17, 1945

Date: vendredi 17 août 2007 1:54

 

As my gift to our liberators and their widows,  I compiled and mailed  the attached collection of memories of August 17, 1945.

 

Let me tell you where these stories come from.  As you know, a few  days ago, I asked people via Natasha Peterson's Weihsien Topica  network,  "Where were you when the American liberators came?" From around the world people began responding.  I collected others from Leopold Pander's Weihsien web site where former internees have posted their memories. Some came from books or articles about Weihsien, abbreviated to make the collection manageable.

 

You'll notice that these stories come from all around the world -- Canada,

United Kingdom, Belgium, New Zealand, HongKong, USA.

 

I wrote to our liberators, "If you ever questioned whether or not you made a difference, just read these accounts.  One writer says, "It was the happiest day of my life."  I told them I want their children and grandchildren to have these stories.

 

Liberator Peter Orlich's widow telephoned me last night after reading the collection -- twice.   She told me she had wept as she read,

 

Thank you for these wonderful memories.  What a day it was!

 

Mary T. Previte

 

 

MEMORIES of August 17, 1945 

from SHANTUNG COMPOUND

 

    “...the boy who spread the word made it clear as he ran through the kitchen yard screaming in an almost insane excitement, ‘An American plane, and headed straight for us.’ We all flung our stirring paddles down beside the cauldrons in the kitchen, left the carrots un-chopped on the tables, and tore after the boys to the ballfield. At this point the excitement was too great for any of us to contain. Suddenly I realized that for some seconds I had been running around in circles, waving my hands in the air and shouting at the top of my lungs. This plane was OUR plane. It was sent here to tell US. To tell us the war was over. The plane’s underside suddenly opened. Out of it floated seven men in parachutes. The height of the incredible!   
Without pausing even a second to consider the danger, we poured like some gushing human torrent down the short road. The avalanche hit the front gate, burst it open and streamed past the guards. Some of the more rational internees were trying to fold the parachutes. Most of us, however, were far too ‘high’ for the task. We just stood there adoring, or ran about shouting and dancing...”

 

                                                                     --Langdon Gilkey, Virginia, USA

 

I took myself home to treat my bleeding soles                            


     Although I was as thrilled as anyone else when these guys dropped from the sky, I never connected with any of them personally. I was a shy 13 year old. My friend and classmate David Birch tells me that he and I were playing ping pong in Kitchen #1 when the sound of an airplane drew us outside. When we got to the front gates, they were open and we went out. I followed the kids ahead of us at a run. That’s when I was stopped by a weed patch. I don't know what they are called but they grow prostrate along the ground and produce lots of tiny little thorny tetrahedral stars that always have one thorn facing the sky. I was of course barefoot! I lifted one foot and saw perhaps 20 thorns up to the hilt in my calluses. I knew there must be a similar number in the other foot. I wanted very much to sit down and pull them out, but that would only have put another 50 of them in my bum. I walked on the thorns for 15 or 20 steps till I got out of the patch, sat down, pulled all the blankety-blank things out of my feet and took myself home to treat my bleeding soles. As you can see, this little experience has completely colored my memory of Liberation Day !
      We heard that one of the parachutists had been slightly injured, and wondered if he had known that the kao liang (broom corn) was 12 feet tall when he made a landing.   I remember hearing that one the guys had his 45 out as he listened to the noises converging on him and only put it away when a crowd of jubilant kids burst through the kao liang.

 

                                                                             --Stan Thompson , Iowa, USA

 

                                                      

Oh, What a Beautiful Morning!

 

My memory is of being in class.  Hearing the plane, so different to the sound of the rare Japanese plane that flew over.  We all rushed outside looking up.  As it circled we ran in circles under it.  Then it started to climb higher, thinking it was going away we stopped and wailed, only to find to our joy there were soon parachutes gently floating down with men attached.   So we rushed to the gate and carried on through for the first time ever.  I confess I didn’t go very far as there were so many prickles attacking my bare feet.  I was certainly part of the reception back at the gateway.  Then we followed with the crowd to stand outside the Headquarters building where Major Staiger spoke to us all.  It wasn’t long before we learnt  'You are my sunshine' and every morning at 6 am they played over loud speakers 'Oh what a beautiful morning, Oh what a wonderful day' regardless of the weather.

 

--Mary (Hoyte) Broughton,   New Zealand

 

 

Liberation Day glimpses

 

     I was on the top floor of the camp hospital along with fellow students, when one of us heard a faint burred humming sound. As this grew louder, our first thought was that it was just another Japanese plane. We crowded to the window and realized that the drone of the plane was unfamiliar to us, and hoped against hope that it was an American plane.
     As the plane circled over the camp, we were thrilled to see the American markings and then witness the heart stopping descent of the parachutes.
One analyst concluded that the parachutes were actually deployed with attached dummies in order to draw enemy fire. Should this have occurred, then the plane would have returned to its base without completing the mission. Fortunately for all of us, the 7 heroes risking their very lives on our behalf, gloriously fulfilled their mission.
      We joined in the stampede to and through the gate to welcome our liberators. As I recall there were no casualties. The leaders in our camp had prepared for the possibility of such a wild chaotic exuberant exodus from the compound on the day of actual liberation by creating their own police unit with the members sporting red armbands. Their immediate task was to get the women and children back into the camp and allow only the able bodied men to recover the support supplies that had been air dropped by the rescue plane. Without their efforts, we might still be roaming the countryside.

                                                                             
--Stanley Nordmo,  Arizona, USA

 

                                                      

 

 

 Memories of  a Ten-Year-Old

I remember seeing the B-24 fly over and the crates and drums falling from the bombays and the 'chutes never opening.  Then I remember the 7 jumped from the B-24.  The parachutes came down so evenly spaced.  They were like steps in a staircase.  Somehow everyone ran out of the gates.  Being small and fast – 10 years old -- I was way ahead of everyone.  I was barefoot and wore shorts.  I ran to the nearest parachute that I saw land and came upon this man in uniform who had his glasses taped to his temples.  He was already disconnected from his 'chute when I arrived.  We were in a field of stubble – maybe gaoliang.  Anyhow, he pointed to some Chinese writing which was printed on his uniform. 

I said to him, ''I'm sorry, Sir, I don't know how to read Chinese''. 

He was amazed. ''You speak English?'' 

''I'm from the camp, Sir”,  I said.   “ We burst the gates''. 

Then the adults showed up, and I was pushed aside. 

 

                                                                    --Ted Pearson,    Montreal,  Canada

                                                    

 

The Most Exciting Day of My Life

 

August 17 was my best friend in camp's birthday, Wies de Jongh.  And we were grinding peanuts, making peanut butter in their front yard.   The plane came over low and then lower and we saw the US insignia and then the pilot and copilot.  I remember the Salvation Army band playing God bless America and the British singing God save the King.  I remember the colorful parachutes red, yellow and blue, coming down and everybody screaming once again when they started realizing that they were people.  What a day!  Has to be the most exciting day in my life.  I have had a wonderful, blessed life.  BUT that was something and the best!  I was 12 years old.

 

                                        --Georgie (Reinbrecht) Knisely.  Pennsylvania, USA

                                                        

 

Georgie,

I remember precisely the same scene. Being with Wies and looking at her birthday presents, when the planes flew low that day. Thank you for the reminder.

In friendship,

                                                                                           --Gay Talbot Stratford 

                                                       

 

It Wasn’t a Dream


     I remember that it was a bright day --- it must have been a cloudless blue sky over Weihsien. I was 4-years old wandering all alone on a grassless slope of dirty brown soil. I was next to a big rock --- as big as I was. I felt lost – completely lost.  Grown-ups running all over the place. In my memory, I remember that all was silent --- very silent. Somebody picks me up --- .

--- And then I wake up in the middle of the night.

     I had this dream for many – many years and finally found out that it was the day that the Americans liberated us on 17th August 1945.

――

     I don’t have that nightmare anymore but the image is indelibly printed in my neurones. Two years ago, when we visited Weifang and the old Weihsien hospital, I think I recognized the brown earth slope going downwards towards the river. Alone and with my digital camera, I started walking upstream towards what had been the Weihsien main gate and walls beyond the compound. I think that it is there that I was lost – 62 years ago. I was then politely and firmly invited to rejoin our group of visitors waiting near the hospital grounds.

Once again, I woke up ――――

 

                                                                                    --Leopold Pander, Belgium

 

 

The Bomber

“IT’S AMERICAN! It’s American!”


   
I remember standing at the top of the outside staircase leading up to the room where our family of four had spent the last 2-1/2 years and seeing the sun sparkle off the aluminum body of this unknown airplane as it turned in the distance and started back toward us, dropping altitude. It grew larger and larger, and the roar of its engines grew stronger and stronger until it was almost directly overhead, and we saw the insignia on its wings.

    "IT'S AMERICAN! It's American!" we shouted to one another.

    Every one of the 1,500 civilian prisoners who could walk must have come out to see this airplane.  Having made a low flight over the center of the walled compound, the silver bird circled back and gained altitude. As I stood at the top of the outside staircase, shirtless, barefooted, my spindly legs brown from the sun sticking out from my khaki shorts, I saw the silver bird out over the field again, this time going from right to left. I was afraid it was leaving.

    Then objects began dropping out of the plane. Parachutes began to open, and I could see arms and legs moving!

    I and hundreds of other prisoners rushed the main gate of the concentration camp, hurtling past the startled Japanese guards standing there with bayonets on rifles. We turned left on the dirt road and pounded into the fields, heedless of the brambles and stones and thorns under our bare feet.

    The seven Americans were crouched down, .45-caliber Tommy-guns held ready when we reached them. It must have been a strange experience for them and perhaps a great relief to be rushed by a ragamuffin crowd of undernourished men, women and children instead of an armed enemy.

    The Americans were carried triumphantly on the shoulders of the men of the camp back through the main gate. They were led by a major, to match the Japanese major who was in command at Weihsien.  In the commandant's office, there was a short, tense confrontation between the two majors. Following the American major's demand that the Japanese major surrender, they eyed one another for a few seconds.  The Japanese commandant unbuckled his sword and laid it on the desk.

 

                                                                         --Albert deZutter, Missouri, USA

 

From Courtyard of the Happy Way

In the middle of the morning while I was dictating a business letter in a  Gregg Shorthand class to a group of girls preparing themselves for Oxford Matriculation, and while hundreds in the camp were at their normal duties, the sound of a plane could be heard.

            It became louder and louder.  Throughout the camp, studies, manual work, and cooking were instinctively and instantly dropped.

            A plane was flying overhead lower and lower, as though searching for our camp.  We were later to know it was a B-24.  British and American flags, which had been concealed in the bottom of trunks from earlier days in Tientsin and Peking, were brought out and waved towards the sky.  The plane responded to these signals and circled even lower, dropping leaflets.  And then the unimaginable happened.   A man floated down on a parachute, followed by six others.  They landed not far from the front gate.

            Without any thought for the camp regulations which had confined us for years, fifteen hundred internees rushed down the main road through the “Courtyard of the Happy Way” gate, past the solitary guard on duty unable to hold us all back, to welcome our liberators.

            We found them a mile outside the gate, perched behind mounds (which were Chinese graves) with loaded guns, uncertain of their reception by the Japanese, but ready for any eventuality.  I suddenly remembered my commitment to the Salvation Army band—to welcome whoever freed us with the “Victory March – the medley of the various Allied national anthems.

            Getting my trombone from Block 23, I rushed back to the gate.  The band was standing on a mound behind the electrified wires at the rear of the church in a position which commanded a good view of the triumphal entry of the seven American parachutists. The baton of Brigadier Stranks gave the signal, and we were away.

            But my eyes strayed from the music to the drama outside the gate.  The parachutists were being carried shoulder high towards the entrance by excited internees.  My right hand went through the motion of playing the trombone as I watched.  In the group of American liberators was Jimmy Moore who had been a prefect in the Chefoo Schools when I was in Second Form.  He had evidently pulled strings to be part of this relief mission.

            Steven, the first trombonist beside me, a tall American lad, stopped playing and collapsed, sobbing like a baby.  I was later told that hospital patients suffering from all kinds of ailments, had jumped out of their ward windows to witness the spectacle, and never returned to their sick beds, mysteriously healed of their physical complaints.

 

                                                                     --Norman Cliff,  United Kingdom

 

 

We Found Ourselves LOCKED OUT!

 

          I remember --- on August 17, 1945, internees poured through The Gate to welcome six American liberators and to carry them in triumph to accept the surrender of the Japanese commanding officer.   Three or four of us Chefoo boys sneaked away from that triumphant procession and dashed into Weihsien (village), where we found the Catholic Mission.  I'll never forget the welcome we were given.  And I'll never forget that when we got back to The Gate, we found ourselves LOCKED OUT!

 

                                                                --James H. Taylor, Hong Kong

 

We Were FREE  from “Song of Salvation at Weihsien Prison Camp”

 

            It was Friday, August 17.  In a scorching heat wave, I was withering with diarrhea, confined to my “poo-gai” mattress on top of three side-by-side steamer trunks in the second floor hospital dormitory.   I heard the drone of an airplane.  Sweaty and barefoot, I raced to the window and watched a plane sweep lower then circle again.  I watched in disbelief.  A giant plan emblazoned with an American star was circling the camp.  Americans were waving from the bomber. Beyond the tree tops, its belly opened. I gaped in wonder as August winds buffeted giant parachutes.  I raced for the entry gates and was swept off my feet by the pandemonium.  Prisoners ran in circles and pounded the skies with their fists. They wept, cursed, hugged, danced. They cheered themselves hoarse.  Very proper grown-ups ripped off their shirts and waved at the B-24 “Liberator” circling overhead.  Wave after wave of prisoners swept past Japanese guards into fields beyond the camp.

A mile away we found them – six Americans – standing with their weapons ready, surrounded by fields of ripening broom corn.  Advancing towards them came a tidal wave of prisoners drunk with joy and free in the open fields.  Ragtag, barefoot, and hollow with hunger, they hoisted the American major onto a bony platform of shoulders and carried him back to the camp in triumph.

In the distance near the gate, the music of “Happy Days Are Here Again” drifted out into the fields.  It was the Salvation Army band playing its joyful Victory Medley. When it got to “The Star Spangled Banner,” the crowd hushed.

         “O, say, does that star spangled banner still wave

O’er the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave.”

From up on his thrown of shoulders, the 27-year-old American major struggled down to a standing salute.  Up on a mound by the gate, a young trombonist in the Salvation Army Band crumpled to the ground and wept.  He knew what we all knew.  We were free.

 

                                                              --Mary Taylor Previte, New Jersey, USA

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Ron Bridge

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, August 17, 2007 10:59 AM

Subject: RE: August 1945

 

 

While those who were in Weihsien (Weifang) a 62 years ago ponder their memories. I thought a short extract from a diary kept at the time might be of interest. ( I have added explantions in italics) It is written in pencil on very thin yellow and yellowing "airmail type " paper on both sides and in the margins, hence it is very very difficult to read I have tried UV Light etc etc. It is definitely authentic 1945 writing

 

Aug 5th McLaren tells Dr JW Price exciting news re the Ruski's joining in against Japan - Terrible Heat

Aug 6th Martenellis fell from a tree - died that evening from terrible injuries ( added from RonB's Memory I was standing six feet away when he hit the ground on the main road)

Aug 7th Funeral of Martinellis - awful heat day & night Dr Grice's glamour girls very bad - Phyllis Parkin worst of all

Aug 8th Mrs Lawless died of paratyphoid after 7 weeks in Hospital. She was buried next day - first in the new cemetery outside the compound walls.

Aug 10th McLaren tried a interview with Watanabe who did not  wish to see him - ran away hotly pursued by McLaren - finally fled out the front gate where McLaren couldn't follow. Awful heat - worst of the whole summer- dripping day and night - heat in huts 97F (RonB 36C) at night.

Aug 14th The Committee have emergency meeting very exciting news received - put up notice saying that "There is reason to believe that the war is over "

Aug 15th Vio says the Emperor of Japan has proclaimed " For the first time in 2600 years Japan has had to ask for Peace terms from four powers"

Aug 16th Nothing but rumours + everyone very excited.

Aug 17th At 10 am great excitement an American plane comes over - flying very low - then 7 men dropped by parachute in the Koaliang filed - then  the plane circled again + dropped lots of gear by parachute we all ran out of front gate - terrific excitement -afternoon fixed up places for them to sleep medical sergt in hospital, others in Commandants office etc Major Staggers (sic) held meeting with Committee + Japs. Chinese boy of 14 injured by parcel falling on head parahcute did not open - very bad fractured skull - carried to Hospital - the Lieut injured shoulder in falling  - all landed prepared to fight - came out of the koaliang towards us with loaded pistols etc

 

Here endeth the extract

Ron B

 

De: "Albert de Zutter" <albertarthur@sbcglobal.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: from Edinburgh, Scotland, HERALD,  August 12, 2007

Date: vendredi 17 août 2007 17:11

 

Good point, Leopold. Mentioning Churchilll is a not very sophisticated way of bringing in the big guns to give weight to a story for which there is no basis.

  

----- Original Message -----

From: Donald Menzi

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, August 17, 2007 9:03 PM

Subject: Re: A collection of memories of Liberation Day, August 17, 1945

 

Good work, Mary!

Donald

De: "rod miller" <rmmiller@optusnet.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: from Edinburgh, Scotland, HERALD,  August 12, 2007

Date: vendredi 17 août 2007 23:49

 

Hello Ron

At 03:01 AM 15/08/2007, you wrote:

I think that I can shed some light on this.
1. Eric Liddell is listed as not having ever applied for evacuation in the Swiss Consular records for Weihsien Camp.


Could the Weihsien internees apply for evacuation?


2. When the second evacuation was being planned for US and Canadians in September 1943 there was also correspondence regarding doing an exchnage for UK British but it was abandoned when it was found that there were insufficient Japanese living in UK or UK colonial territory to do a swap.
Remember for every Canadian released to Canada  a Japanese resident in Canada was exchanged and the same thing happened with the US. In the first exchange in August 1942 which was largely diplomatic and quasi diplomatic staff through Lournco Marques the numbers were not so precise as it was a diplomatic "thing".


Sorry Ron but I don't believe this is quite correct. What is difficult to understand is that on the insistence of the US the negotiations for exchange of British and US internees were conducted separately. This was insisted on by the US in 1942 for they had assumed that the British held no Japanese internees for there were only 25 diplomatic staff held in London at the outbreak of the Pacific war.
It's true that in the UK proper they held no Japanese after the first exchange but Australia had only released 870 Japanese for the first exchange and was still holding at least 400. It was politics that derailed the 2nd British exchange. For the second British exchange to go ahead the Japanese were insisting on 300 merchant sea men held in Australia to be part of the exchange.  MacArthur couldn't believe we had released 870 for the first exchange for they had knowledge of Australia's north from where we were being attacked. He refused to release the sailors which just brought whole the question of a 2nd British exchange and a 3rd American exchange to a complete halt. The American special division that was handling the exchange in the US, got so infuriated with MacArthur they approached Roosevelt who approached Churchill. It's a long story but the British had forced Curtin to include the 870 for the first exchange, for which Australia only received 32 Australians in return. Curtin supported MacArthur and that is the reason there was no 2nd British exchange.


3 However Eric Liddell's wife  Flo had not gone back to Tientsin after their 1940 home leave  which ahd begun in Scotland and went to live in Toronto with their children and as Eric Liddell's  next of kin had a Canadian Address he would have briefly been listed as Canadian and hence eligible for exchange evacuation. His passport was definitely British ( issue by Brfitish Consulate Teitnsin in January 1937) thus I am of the considered opinion from the research that I have done that the fact that he was consdiered for exchange was based on incomplete knowledge of the facts above rumour and surmise.




turned down an offer of liberation by Winston Churchill from a wartime internment camp in China in favour of another prisoner


Could  Winston Churchill could have got an offer into Weihsien with out all of you knowing?
Seems a little farfetched to me?

Rod

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Updated Weihsien "Slide Show"

Date: samedi 18 août 2007 2:45

 

 

Happy anniversary, all you Weihsieners.

 

For some of you the big day has already passed, but here in the U.S. it's still the 17th.

 

Mary has done a very nice thing in collecting all those descriptions of that day in 1945 and sharing them with us.  For my part, I have just updated the "Weihsien Walking Tour" slide show by adding the photograph of the jubilant crowd of internees coming out the gate as the concluding image.  Many thanks to Leopold for drawing our attention to it.  It is, as he says, the best photo in the entire collection. 

 

If any of you are interested in re-taking the "walking tour" or re-living the wonderful 2005 celebration, you can now do so by going either to http:/weihsien.menzi.org or simply to www.menzi.org.

 

Best wishes to the whole Weihsien family, scattered around the world.  And thanks again to our Weifang city government friends for hosting such a wonderful anniversary celebration in 2005.  After all they have done for us, I personally hope that they are able to capitalize on their Olympic connection to bring even more people to visit their historic park.

 

Donald Menzi

 

----- Original Message -----

From: sipabit

To: MTPrevite@aol.com

Sent: Friday, August 17, 2007 5:38 PM

Subject: Re: Fw: liberation day-- Peter Bazire's diary

 

yes it came through, fabulous read.  I remember the pistol on the hip, but not the other one!  I also remember an adult in the camp from Tienstin who looked Chinese and he apparently was getting messages wrapped in oilpaper throughout.  I believe he lived in the dorms where my Aunty Dolly (Block 50?)  lived i.e a bachelor.  She told my folks just after my birthday that the war was supposed to be over.  Thanks.

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: from Edinburgh, Scotland, HERALD,  August 12, 2007

Date: samedi 18 août 2007 5:14

 

Albert, Leopold, et al.

 

As soon as I read that first account about Winston Churchill arranging a repatriation of Eric Liddell, and Liddell turning it down, I said to myself, "This has to be completely phoney!"  I agree that Winston Churchill would not be arranging this sort of thing.  Secondly, if Liddell really had been offered a repatriation, it would almost certainly have been to Canada to rejoin his wife, Florence, and their little girls.

 

Yes, I agree that Liddell was a truly saintly man, but he was also a husband and the father of little girls, one of whom he had never even seen yet.  I think that at this point, where his normal missionary work was no longer possible, he would have (or certainly should have) rejoined his little family if the way had really opened up for that!  Which I don't believe for a moment it did.

 

You are right that a legend has begun to form around Eric Liddell. He was certainly a good man, and there are legendary aspects to his life. But he did have his feet firmly planted on the ground and was still just a man. 

 

I knew Eric Liddell from afar, heard him tell the story of the 1924 Olympics to a group of us young people in the camp, and definitely in those days saw him as a Christian hero.  So I have no bias against him, but I know for certain that there would have been no major movement to repatriate him at the height of World War Two.  That's just someone's dream!

 

David

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Henrietta DeJong

Date: samedi 18 août 2007 17:22

 

Does anyone have contact information for Henrietta DeJong?

 

Mary Previte

 

De: "lucy lu" <lucy9859@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Updated Weihsien "Slide Show"

Date: lundi 20 août 2007 7:39

 

Dear Donald Menzi,

 

Glad to hnow that you've updated the weishien walking tour slide show, but

I can't log on your recomended website. Is there any other solution?

 

Thanks for your great idea about the olympic connection of weihsien camp.

 

Best regards.

 

lucy

weifang foreign & overseas chinese affairs office

 

 

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Updated Weihsien

Date: mardi 21 août 2007 17:23

 

Dear Lucy,

 

Apparently the new site www.menzi.org is being blocked in China since it works OK here.

 

I will send you a CD with the slide shows and with the documents that related to Weihsien so you can print them out.

 

Please email me your mailing address and I will make them for you right away.

 

Donald Menzi

 

 

De: "lucy lu" <lucy9859@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Updated Weihsien

Date: jeudi 23 août 2007 5:17

 

Dear Sir,

Please email me at: Lu Jie, Room 1405, 99 Shengli Dong Street, Weifang

City, Shandong Province, P.R.China.

Thanks so much.

Lucy

 

 

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Barbara "Dickie" Cameron

Date: jeudi 23 août 2007 21:45

 

Hi Everyone --

I have a lovely picture of "Dixie" Cameron, take in the camp just before we left for Tientsin. I also have one of the Shaw girls, of Leo (can't remember his last name,  the Deans, missionaries in our block, Father DeJaeger in front of a C-47 with the pilot and a Chinese soldier; actually I have a total of 9 photos I'd love to send to Leopold, but I need more info from him to do the job.

Pamela

 

Pamela Masters - Author/Publisher

Henderson House Publishing

Titles: The Mushroom Years, Sass & Serendipity

Phone: 530-647-2000

Fax: 530-647-2002

pamela@hendersonhouse.com

http://www.hendersonhouse.com

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Barbara "Dickie" Cameron

Date: vendredi 24 août 2007 5:00

 

Dear Bobby. I would like to have all the photos if you put them on the email or net. I Remember Barbara Cameron, we used to call her Dickie. She had a sister Alice ( I think). We used to call her "Woodgie"  Her stepfather was "Booboo" Cameon. They were from Tsintsien. "Leo" may be Leo Twyford-Thomas who died a few years ago , in Sydney and his daughters live in Sydney somewhere. Joyce Bradbury-----

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Barbara "Dickie" Cameron

Date: vendredi 24 août 2007 7:34

 

Dear Pamela,

Great :-))

I'd be glad to add your photos on the weihsien-paintings web-site ---

Technically speaking, you can scan them at 300dpi (printer definition) and send them to me by e-mail as *.jpg-files. The files will be quite big --- so send them "one" or "two" at the time. The other way is to make colour-photocopies of your photos and send them by post to Belgium: Sentier du Berger, 15 -- B-1325-Corroy-le-Grand -- Belgium -----

Hope you manage :-)

I'm always keen to add "whatever" is related to Weihsien ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: book

Date: vendredi 24 août 2007 11:02

 

Hello,

I just found and bought a very interesting book about the Emperor's Army:

http://www.amazon.fr/Larm%C3%A9e-lempereur-Violences-crimes-1937-1945/dp/2200266979

--- it is in French but I am certain that many of you read "French".

There is a whole chapter about the civilian prisoners in the Far East. Weihsien is mentioned and so is Greg Leck's book.

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Barbara "Dickie" Cameron

Date: samedi 25 août 2007 0:05

 

Would Leo have possibly been Leo Owerkirk (sp?)?  I remember Leo Owerkirk from Weihsien. We visited together a bit just after the war ended. I was 13 and I think he would have been 11 or 12.  I told him I was from Vancouver in Canada, and it turned out he had actually been there before the war and remembered our famous Stanley Park.

 

One of the little oddities I can recall of our conversation was his pronunciation of the name of an automobile that I think he said his dad had owned. The car, Leo said was a PLY - mouth. The first syllable rhymed with 'high' and the second syllable was pronounced just as the word 'mouth.'  I did not correct him (why embarrass the kid) but got a real kick out of it myself.

 

Anyway, I remember Leo as a really friendly kid, a nice boy!

 

Anyone else has memories of Leo Owerkirk or knows what he went on to do in life?  Also you may know the proper spelling of his name.

 

David

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Barbara "Dickie" Cameron

Date: samedi 25 août 2007 1:50

 

Hi Joyce --

When Dickie Cameron came to visit me in So Cal she called herself Dixie, maybe that's where I got the idea that she was Dixie in camp. Her sister's name was 'Oogie' -- Lord, I haven't an idea where all those crazy nicknames came from. I am forwarding all the pics to Leopold and he will put them into his web pages. Leo is a sweet, bug-eyed gentlemen of about 45, who was always so helpful to anyone who needed assistance, when you see his picture you will recognize him.

Great hearing from you -- Pamela (Bobby)

 

De: "Albert de Zutter" <albertarthur@sbcglobal.net>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: book

Date: samedi 25 août 2007 8:48

 

Thanks for the recommendation, Leopold. The book is not listed in the American version of Amazon, but I emailed them and asked that they stock it. They do have a number of French language books that came up when I put the title in the search space -- some having "L'empereur" in the title and others about various military subjects -- Algeria, Indo-China, Napoleon, etc. Anyway, we'll see if they decide to stock it for American consumption. I am interested in reading the book.

  

  Regards,

  

  Albert

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: more extracts from Peter Bazire's diary,

Date: jeudi 30 août 2007 8:28

 

Hello,

Peter just sent me four new double-pages of his diary ---

--- here they are --- in "avant première" ---

Best regards,

Leopold

""

Saturday, August 18th,

 

People young and old were asking that Americans to write their names in their autograph albums or suchlike books.

 

I forgot to say that on Friday evening the sewing room made letters out of the parachute "O.K. TO LAND" for the airdrome which is about 5 miles South of us.

 

Also the U.V. and L.V. (Lower & Upper 5th forms (aged 14 & 15)) had to be messengers for the camp police who wore red armbands with C.P. in black. We wore green scarves on our left arms.

 

First of all we did from 2-6 p.m.. There weren’t many messages to carry.

 

- Saturday (continued)

 

There were 3 messangers (sic) at H.Q. (S.W. room of 25) & 2 at the gate. The hours were permanent ― 9.30 ― 11.30; 11.30 ― 1.00; 1.00 ― 3.00; 3.00 ― 5.00 from then on. I was on from 1 ― 3 at the gate. I was told in the morning that A. Hummel & Tipton were expected that day. I saw horses the other side of the river coming down the path. I guessed that they were T + H. (Tipton and Hummel). The horses' tails were different colour from the main body. A Chinese told us that they were. When they came in sight again they were walking with a Chinese officer between them. Tipton was in canary khaki & Hummel in blue trousers & white shirt. The camp came down to the front gate to see them especially D. Candlin who is H's girl friend. They went to H.Q. & the Adm. Building & talked there.

 

A wretched Jap plane was on the airfield so when the B-24 came that afternoon, it couldn't land. As well the Japs had some men with rifles on the base. The major was very heated with the Japs.

 

I was up the Hospital tower when the B-24 came. Tad, a nervy little chap stood on the top railing of the parapet & held on the roof. Immediately he saw the plane in the distance, he said that it was a B-24. The plane flew low over the camp a few times & the last time it flew very close to the tower ― we had a good view. In the evening I played the violin duet with Pat. Evenden. ― Youth concert.

 

Sunday, August 19th

 

Nothing much.

 

There was a church parade in the morning, all scouts, guides, rangers, rovers (not cubs & brownies) taking part. Also all ex-soldiers & volunteers etc…. had seats reserved. They marched down main road while the band played. I came late 'cause of band but had a seat reserved. It was an Anglican service in which all clergy (6) & the bishop took part. Mr. Mc. Douall led the sermon. He read the whole thing. All the ex-service men wore their medals ― some had at least 10. At the end we lined up outside the church & were dismissed. J. Moore & a couple of other soldiers came at the end & the people gathered around them & talked.

 

In the afternoon about 4.30. a plane came over & looked dark & also didn't look like the B-24 so people thought it was a Jap. People thought it funny for the Americans to go down to the field the other side of the river where there was a white cross, but the Americans knew it to be a C-47. It had its wheels down ― 2 engines & an ordinary tail. ― Nothing much for the rest of the day. When on duty a Jap found a hand grenade & threw it into the river.

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Father Hanquet's map ---

Date: mardi 4 septembre 2007 13:33

 

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/hanquet/mapAsiaUNRA/p_map01.htm

did you find Wei-hsien? on the railroad track from CH'ING-TAO to LI-CH'ENG?

---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

Hello all,

There is a new chapter just opened on http://www.weihsien-paintings.org thanks to Anne de Saint Hubert, Christian's daughter.

click here:

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/Christian_deSaintHubert/indexFrame.htm

--- also and a very interesting article about Christian de Saint Hubert from the Warship International magazine (1994) written by Christopher Wright.

There is more to come ---- (I'll let you know :-))

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: new chapter

Date: vendredi 21 septembre 2007 9:44

 

I forgot to add a link:

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/hanquet/mapAsiaUNRA/ColourMapChina.jpg

It is Father Hanquet's map of China (1943) in colour. I scaned it at 300dpi and if somebody is interested in having it (20Mb!!!!) I'll have to send it on a CD. You can print it in a photocopy shop - big size and in coulour (providing they have the device to do it).

all the best,

Leopold

 

De: "rod miller" <rmmiller@optusnet.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Punch cards

Date: mardi 25 septembre 2007 12:48

 

 

Hello Weihsieners,

were you aware of the NARA search engine for POW punch-cards (link below)?

It's a very useful tool which must only recently have been made

available, as I haven't come across it before.

I think it only covers US personnel.

 

http://aad.archives.gov/aad/display-partial-records.jsp?s=644&dt=466&tf=F&q=weihsien&btnSearch=Search&as_alq=&as_anq=&as_epq=&as_woq=

 

Rod Miller

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <jonathan.henshaw@ualberta.ca>; <dmenzi@earthlink.net>; <tapol@skynet.be>

Objet: Weihsien

Date: jeudi 27 septembre 2007 16:10

 

Dear Jonathan Henshaw:

 

Your request for information about Weihsien has been forwarded to me by  Leopold Pander who has created the remarkable Weihsien web site.

 

As a child, I was interned in Weihsien with students and teachers of the Chefoo School.  This school had first been interned in on its own compound by the beach in Yantai and later in two compounds in the Temple Hill area of Yantai. The whole school and retired  missionaries  were relocated to Weihsien when Japan  consolidated the small internment camps in North China into the larger facility  in Weihsien.

 

I  have forwarded your request to Donald Menzi, a relative of the Wilders. 

I believe Donald has the Wilder diaries and remarkable  watercolors of Weihsien painted by Gertrude Wilder.   Donald Menzi has  compiled one of the best bibliographies of books about Weihsien.  There are  many.

 

Chefoo School archives also have several accounts of this internment written by Chefoo School teachers.

 

You may also be interested in a book written by Sister M. Servatia, Order  of St. Francis,  A CROSS IN CHINA, A Story of My  Mission, that includes detailed accounts of the Weihsien experience  of members of this Roman Catholic order who were in interned there. This book is published by Cuchullain Publications, One Rose Marie Alley, Fort Wayne, Indiana  46802

 

Another source of information is available in the archives of Cardinal Stitch University, 6801 N. Yates Road,  Milwaukee WI   53217  (414-410-4000)  An unpublished document --  FRANCISCANS:  SHANTUNG -- includes letters and accounts from Weihsien.   Many of the Franciscan sisters who were in Weihsien retired there at Cardinal Stitch University after the war.

 

You can go to the Norman Cliff chapter on the Weihsien web site and access letters about Weihsien  sent by Mr. Egger, a Swiss envoy who regulatly inspected the camp to report to USA authorities about conditions there.   These letters come from the U.S. National Archives.].

Mary Taylor Previte

 

 

De: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

À: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: Wilder and Galt Diaries

Date: jeudi 27 septembre 2007 17:46

 

 

Hello, Weihsieners,

 

FYI I am forwarding to you my response to an inquiry to Leopold's web site.  It's always nice to find that new people find the Weihsien story interesting and important.

 

Donald Menzi

 

-----Forwarded Message-----

>From: Donald Menzi <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

>Sent: Sep 27, 2007 10:53 AM

>To: Jonathan Henshaw <Jonathan.Henshaw@ualberta.ca>

>Cc: Leopold <tapol@skynet.be>

>Subject: Wilder and Galt Diaries

> 

> 

>Dear Jonathan,

> 

>I'm so glad that you appreciated coming across the Wilder and Galt diaries.  George Wilder was my grandfather, and the copy I have of his diary was among some of his papers that were archived in the University of Michigan's Bentley Historical Library.  It had been transcribed by my Uncle.  It's not the correct place for his material, but my parents lived in Michigan and when the library expressed an interest, they gave them to them.

> 

>The Galt documents are in a more appropriate location - the Yale Divinity School library's special collection on missionary documents.  I discovered the Galt memoirs quite by chance.  They are listed as a source at the back of John Hersey's novel, "The Call," and I was able to get the library to make me a photocopy.

> 

>May I ask which web site you found them on?  I have two locations with variouos URLs.

> 

>And were you able to play the video "walking tour" of the camp?  Some people have had trouble getting it to load.

> 

>Leopold Pander is the encylopedic source of photos, paitings and writings about Weihsien.  My sites are pretty much limited to the stuff that I have, which is still quite a lot.  I could send you a bibliography listing books written by former Weihsieners, all of which are, I believe, available from various on-line used-book dealers.

> 

>Best wishes.

> 

>Donald Menzi

> 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: peter's diary

Date: samedi 29 septembre 2007 7:22

 

More from Petter's diary :-))

Best regards,

Leopold

 

""

Monday, August 20th

 

The rumour was that about 20 Americans were in Weihsien & that 7 planes were to arrive that day. The last rumour didn't happen. The 20 odd Americans came about 11.00 in a truck ― a mission for release work in Korea but were turned back. The story was they were sent to Korea & landed on an airdrome near a camp on Saturday. The Japs were very pleasant in the afternoon but on Sunday morning broke some of their previous promises & the L. Col. got heated with them & the Japs got heated back. The Japs trained two tank's guns on the house of the Americans but the American's walked to their plane as if they were allowed to ― all were dead funked as they walked. The plane was only a transport they went about 180 m.p.h. They were funked because of (a) suicide Jap planes (b) they had no life belts for the sea. Luckily they got away safely & landed at 6.00 p.m. on Sunab.

 

They had a photographing outfit & took several pictures. Each man had a crowd around him & signed their names for people. The car on the main road went backwards & forwards with people inside (children) & outside up main road. The highest man was Lieut. Colonel Bird

 

May I say that all this time since the first batch came & had fixed up the wireless set, bulletins were posted up on the walls outside kitchens for the public to read. It was called 'The Zoom'. Also Mr.Egger has been in & out.

 

Marketing is going over the wall all the time. We gave tins & old clothing mainly & they mainly gave eggs, water melons, sugar, tomatoes, apples & sometimes cigarettes, corncobs, chickens, soap.

 

We sometimes gave money. Roughly 4 apples = 100 dollars P.R.B. One big water melon 500. Eggs 20-50$.

A Jap at the front gate lost his head & fired, after long manuvering (sic) with his pistol, at the Chinese selling. He purposely fired above their heads. About 4 p.m. the C of Police ran after the Chinese & fired above their heads & he came to the fence where there was a Chinese just the other side. It looked funny to see him purposely fire above his head with his small pistol.

At 4.00 there was chocolate for 1 – 16 or sweets. I drew chocolate.

 

In the evening there was a "Gala Supper" on the ball field. At 7.00 the band played a couple of marches & finished up with the victory march which contained the national anthem of :- England, America, China, Russia, Norway, Holland, France & finished up with the English one in 4/4 time instead of 3/4.

 

Then the orchestra played which was too soft for outside.

There were two big flags E + A on the catcher's net with a "V" of bulbs. Also a few Swiss e.t.c. here & then Ada Foxlee & Gillian Hall danced a Hungarian dance which the A's photographed. The photo is about "X". Then there was a ball-room dancing alternated with a 'hula' dance by Betty Lambert, 'tap' dance by Sheila Black, by Mrs. Baliante, Russian folk song; song by Mrs. Prior; Mr. Gleed sang.

 

Once after a dance Mr. Adams played his clarinet in & out of the dancers very beautifully. The dance ended at 11.00 p.m. when the room lights went out. The street lights stayed on for ages. Some of the band including Mr. Adams played on until 3.00 a.m.

At the supper there was a terrific stink of bigar.

 

P.S. In the afternoon about 4.30 theC-47 flew low over the camp a few times just for thrill. Some people were funked because it flew so low. It dipped its wings.

 

 

Tuesday 21st

In the evening, the B-24 flew low over the camp.

 

Wednesday 22nd

 

About 7.00 the C-47 flew over the camp low once & then flew away to SIAN. We were told that the men might come back in a few days. About 10 were left in Weihsien.

The marketing was stopped during the morning. When on duty we sat on the turret & talked all the time. Only about 4 messages were run in the whole time. When a garbage box was carried out we had to drive the Chinese urchins away.

During the afternoon I would go to the moongate & talk with the Americans.

The jump on Friday was Sgt Ray N Hanchulak's 23rd jump. The major's 10th. E Wong's 1st. You sit down & get shoved out. The order of the paratroops is as follows:-

1) Major Staiger

2) Tad Nagaki,

3) Sgt. Ray Hanchulak,

4)

5) E. Wong,

6)

7)

 

Sgt. Ray told us that he had 5 weeks training. He has jumped in enemy territory many times. In the evening M. Staiger came out and sang a few songs. He always forgot the words ½ way through. It was about the first time he has ever talked with the children ― too buisy (sic). About 8.15 the radio was placed on the veranda for the public to listen to.

At 8.40 we held a court of honour about the 10 knives we were given. The Weihsien troops were given 8 & a compass & mouth organ. We had a good wrist compass. The knives were beauties. U.S.A.

 

Thursday 23rd

The 3 schools ― Chefoo ― Weihsien ― American school were photographed with a small Kodak camera ― 2 photos each.

 

In the evening there was a softball England v America. After the first innings 3 Ams. came, J. Moore (R.F.), P. Orlick (S.S.) & Tad Nagaki (C.). Tad is in my mind the best catcher in camp. I was told he couldn't peg fast 'cause he strained a muscle but he was as quick as anything, getting some which meant a quick spring. He was very springy although he played in boots. He did some good hard hits. P. Orlick made a very good S.S. He had a hardball peg, a flick of the rist (sic). He made about the most hits ― a very well placed bunt down 1st. He also squirmed bases. J Moore has hardly ever played before ― being brought up in an English school. He made a good hard hit at the pitcher ― a cricket drive. The ball went over 2nd base & he got 1 base. He also did some good work at R.F. Am-Radio in moongate. A bulletin is posted up every morning.

 

The market was opened from 10.30 - 11.30 & 3- 4. Only for adults. It was by the fence near the river. Also private marketing was going on N.E. of the hos. + at 23. (not allowed)

There were about 15 Chinese soldiers & an officer doing something outside the gate. We brought food and tea to them. Their job was to look after the market. They had 1945 rifles but they looked local ― some were cracked.

 

Friday 24th

Nothing except some odd rumours which didn't happen.

 

Saturday 25th

 

In the morning a radio message came to say that Tad Nagaki was to be sergeant instead of corporal.

When we went on duty as on previous days, we saw a Jap talking to the Chinese soldiers. This time a fuhny (sic) tall Chinese was teaching the J. bayoneting. Chinese go in for a lot of funny style. We got their food for them as usual.

We heard a rumour when on duty that a plane had left SIAN at noon &was expected between 4.30 & 5.30. I was about the first to see it coming in the West. I told the other people on the ball field tower & we yelled & in a few minutes the whole camp was gathering on the field. The plane flew from N to S over the field N of our camp & landed parachutes of supplies.

It came over about 5 times & dropped some in packages ― sections tied together & some containers.

The last time it flew over & dropped no parachutes & we knew it had finished ― it circled there as usual but before reaching the field ― it turned W & dipped its wings twice & went forever.

May I say that when the plane first was seen the major who was on the field with the other men, fired first a green then a yellow 'Very' light. Also he made some green then yellow thick smoke.

There were 14 drops in all. Some of the usual long pakages & some boxes containing chocolate & cigarettes. The long containers had tin goods such as sliced bacon ― roast beef ― steamed fruit cake (3¾ ozs net) ― all these tins are different from the parcels we had months ago. The tins were of green khaki colour.

The plane is called the "Armoured Angel"

 

Sunday, August 26th,

Chocolate was given to everybody in camp ration D greased on the outside. For the regular drawers of cigarettes 6½ packets each. Nothing much the rest of the day. A note was type written to Major Staiger in thanks for the knives. All 10 of us signed below.

#

End of page

 

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: peter's diary

Date: samedi 29 septembre 2007 14:33

 

What a fascinating record from Peter Bazire~

 

I know that our liberator, Tad Nagaki, and the widows of liberators Jim Moore and Peter Orlich will be thrilled to read these fascinating details of their time in Weihsien. I'll forward these pages to them.

 

Keep the pages coming, Peter.

 

Mary Previte

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>; "Janette & Pierre @ home" <pierre.ley@pandora.be>; "lulu lucy" <lucy9859@hotmail.com>

Objet: Visit to Belgium

Date: dimanche 7 octobre 2007 10:51

 

Hello :-))

Its good to share ---

go to:

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/60YearsAfter/SlideShow/WeifangTV/index.htm

---- send me the pictures of the U.K. visit and we can get it all together with the captions --- the names etc. ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Liberation of Weihsien -- in a DVD about liberation of concentration camps

Date: mardi 9 octobre 2007 0:31

 

May we have your opinion, please?

 

The National World War II Museum in New Orleans, USA,  has included  the liberation of Weihsien in a 12-minute DVD that focuses on LIBERATION and  FREEDOM in World War II.  The DVD tells its very moving story  with music,  1945  photographs,   and  personal stories  told by those who were  liberated or who helped to liberate six or seven camps  in Germany,  Poland, Austria, and  -- Weihsien.

 

After the museum learned of our 2005 Weihsien reunion, I was invited to tell about our liberation.  Before that, the museum knew nothing about Weihsien.

 

Would you like to have Leopold include on his Weihsien web site only the segments about Weihsien?  Or would you like to include the whole  12 minutes that show the liberation of Weihsien in the context of the  liberation of camps all around the world?

 

 

The DVD was professionally-produced as part of a $300 million fund raising effort that will dramatically expand the museum's facitities. It was shown and a copy was given as a gift to each patron at a recent gala that launched the  museum's fund raising for its expansion. .

 

 

The World War II Museum is affiliated with the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C.

 

Mary Previte

 

 

From: Donald Menzi

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, October 09, 2007 12:39 AM

Subject: Re: Liberation of Weihsien -- in a DVD about liberation of concentration camps

 

Mary,

Without having seen any of it, I generally believe that it's useful to place things in historical context, so I'd vote for the whole thing.

Don

 

De: "Raymond Moore" <raym82@hotmail.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Liberation of Weihsien -- in a DVD about liberation of concentration camps

Date: mardi 9 octobre 2007 0:53

 

 

Thanks Mary for all the bits and pieces that you bring to our attention.  I would like to see the whole twelve minutes as it would put the Weihsien bit into context.

 

Ray Moore

 

Bev & Ray Moore

4 Catherine Court Traralgon  Victoria 3844 Australia

Phone:   (03) 5174 0531

 

 

 

 

De: "Fred & Coral Dreggs" <adreggs@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Liberation of Weihsien -- in a DVD about liberation of concentration camps

Date: mardi 9 octobre 2007 2:26

 

Hi Mary,

 

I would very much like to see the whole 12 minutes

 

Thank You

 

Fred

 

De: <grannydavies@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Liberation of Weihsien -- in a DVD about liberation of concentration camps

Date: mardi 9 octobre 2007 2:48

 

 Hi Mary, forgot to answer the question, Yes would like the whole 12 mins.

thanks, Phyllis

 

 

De: "Alison Holmes" <aholmes@prescott.edu>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: RE: Liberation of Weihsien -- in a DVD about liberation of concentration camps

Date: mardi 9 octobre 2007 2:51

 

I think it is coming across loud and clear, Mary!  Whole 12 minutes please.

What a treat.   Well done you for getting the Museum to include Weihsien............Alison

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Liberation of Weihsien -- in a DVD about liberation of concentration camps

Date: mardi 9 octobre 2007 5:47

 

Yes I think the whole 12 minutes ought to be included. Thanks Mary.Joyce Bradbury

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Liberation of Weihsien -- in a DVD about liberation of concentration camps

Date: mardi 9 octobre 2007 7:02

 

--- click on this link:

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/Mprevite/VideoWWIImuseum/p_Video.htm

click on the various links and let us know what you get? (the camera pictogram brings you to the film ---)

---- all the 12 minutes --- pictures and sound :-))

Leopold

 

De: "georgeanna knisely" <jknisely@paonline.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Liberation of Weihsien -- in a DVD about liberation of concentration camps

Date: mardi 9 octobre 2007 12:56

 

Mary, I vote for the 12 minutes.  Love to see us in perspective.  Like the book on all the camps in China!!  Thanks for all you so and keep finding.  Georgie

 

De: "Pamela Masters" <pamela@hendersonhouse.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Liberation of Weihsien -- in a DVD about liberation of concentration camps

Date: mercredi 10 octobre 2007 1:32

 

Hi Mary --

I'd definitely like to see the full 12 minutes. Thank you for your great promotion of the Weihsien story. Who knows? Someday we might find we're not preaching to the choir anymore... and that would be great for all of us. Thanks again -- Pamela

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Liberation of Weihsien -- in a DVD about liberation of concentration camps

Date: mercredi 10 octobre 2007 4:07

 

I think it would be good to include the full 12 minutes enabling the liberation of Weihsien to be shown in the context of the liberation of several other prison camps in other countries.

 

But only if that is convenient for Leopold.

 

De: "peter bazire" <psbazire@yahoo.co.uk>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Liberation of Weihsien

Date: mercredi 10 octobre 2007 12:34

 

Hullo Mary,

  Yes, all 12 minutes please.

  Cheerio,

  Peter

 

      

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Liberation of Weihsien -- in a DVD about liberation of concentration camps

Date: mercredi 10 octobre 2007 12:58

 

 Hello,   David:

 

 I think you'll enjoy this 12-minute video focusing on the theme of freedom and liberation of WORLD  WAR II concentration camps. .  It was

professionally-produced   for the National World War II Museum in New Orleans this spring to  help launch a $300 million fund raising effort for an expansion of the museum.

 

The video features music, photographs, and  personal stories of men and women who were in concentration camps or who helped  to liberate the camps in Germany, Poland, Austria -- and Weihsien.  I was interviewed about Weihsien. 

These very brief exerpts were chosen from several hours of interviews.

 

Donald Bishop, he Information Officer of  the U.S. Embasssy in Beijing, who attended  the  60th anniversary  reunion in Weihsien in 2005, suggested that the museum include   Weihsien in the video.  That's how Weihsien was added to this  story.

 

I was invited to New Orleans to be at the  fund raising gala at the museum where  they showed this video and gave to  each guest -- about 300 people -- a copy of this DVD.  You can view it  at _ http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/Mprevite/VideoWWIImuseum/Videos/p_film01.htm _   

(http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/Mprevite/VideoWWIImuseum/Videos/p_film01.htm )

 

 

 Mary

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Peter Bazire's Diary ---

Date: mercredi 10 octobre 2007 16:27

 

Hello,

--- here are the latest adds from Peter Bazire's diary: Monday 27th August 1945 --- (on the web-site shortly with more sketches by Peter)

 

""

Monday, August 27th

The time is changed to Big Ben time. At 7.00 (which used to be 8.00) we heard and saw a plane coming towards us. It looked longer and more sleek than the usual B-24. It was a B-29. When it flew low & close it looked very slick. It had an ordinary tail not like the B-24 which had a double one. In a few minutes a second one arrived. The first to arrive had an "A" on the top fin of the tail. The second didn't. After about 10 minutes a third appeared like the first. They circled around & eventually held a wireless conversation with our Ams in camp here. I forget to say that the first one dropped pamphlets at about 7.30 & again at about 7.40. They landed at the ball field.

At about 9.15 the plane dropped some white parachutes. I noticed that some didn't have parachutes. My father said that he would do my 9.30-10.00 pumping so I went out of the camp with a lot of other men & boys & helped roll the stuff along. It was terribly damaged – tins of fruit salad just half empty so we helped ourselves. On the pamphlets it said that supplies would be dropped in an hour or two. I saw a few planes appearing over the East horizon.

I had to go back & get some buckets for broken tins. In the meantime the B-24s came over.

When I went out again I found that it was very dangerous. They would land big drums about 2'x4' & some larger ones about 2 times the length - also clothing & medical supplies.

The stuff might land within 10 yards of you – nearly get killed.

The B-29s couldn't go slower than 200 m.p.h. so the stuff came down at a great angle.

"Heads up" was what people would say when a plane came from E-W low.

The planes (which had 1°.W.SUPPLIES under their wings) made circles E-W-S-E-N-W-west always over us. It was really dangerous.

We were told afterwards that there were 12 planes in all but it seemed like only 7. A plane would circle around a few times & drop its stuff & then go & another would come. They came from OKONAWA (sic) except the 'Armoured Angel'.

Some of the planes were supposed to be Flying or Super Fortresses.

If you saw a plane coming you would have to make up your mind which way to go – N or S. The plane always seemed to follow you. It would face your way but go slightly side ways. I once had to go either N or S so I went N to find the plane doing as above & the stuff landed within 10 yards earth & juice hitting my face.

I expected to find a number of Chinese & us killed but there were evidently none. One Italian was grazed on the shoulder but was alright & went on working. Some people missed being killed by 3 foot or less.

All the time we were out there, we hogged away at tinned fruit salad & at tinned peach & milk.

There was also tinned grape fruit juice which was the most wanted for thirst. Also people helped themselves to packages of chocolate & chewing gum. They swiped enough to keep them going for the rest of the day. The men took cigarettes.

Around 10.30 I was on guard at the house where there was a temporary dump. There was a drum with only about 6" of cocoa in the bottom.

Then I went & helped roll the drums to the dump. When a plane came over we would say 'all clear' because the flaps were shut. But when it got over us the flaps would open & the stuff would crash down the other side of the river. It wasn't a very pleasant to see the huge drums crash amongst the Chinese although I found out after that one or two were slightly hurt.

When the planes went at about 11, I went the other side of the field on the N side where the stream bends. There I took off my shoes & waded across (the water only came up just above my knees) the river (about 15 ft wide) & helped chuck bust tins into a drum.

I had a good fillup of grape fruit juice which was wanted by my body. The Chinese were given the empty tins, but some that I kicked, I found full so I took them away.

Then everything was carried to the main dump.

From there Luxon & I carried stuff on a crate without sides. It was awkward crossing the river because there was hardly enough room for two couples to cross at a time. We stopped at 12.45 for dinner but before that the last load we carried was a whole lot of soap & a bag of caps on top. We had a half time rest. People passing by helped themselves to the caps so we did.

At 1.30 I went to the front gate but found that they didn't need any more work. But I wanted to go out for the thrill so I managed to squirm with a cart & we carried in about 5 small drums. The work was finished by about 2.30.

Then we had to move the stuff from outside the church to inside.

About 4.00 I was going to get a shower when I was asked to haul the reserve gang cart to the church for carrying medical supplies. They stank abominably. We finished at about 4.30. Then I had a long wanted shower.

Late in the afternoon a couple of C-47s landed at the airport & about 7.00 p.m. supplies were brought in by truck. Sugar & C-Ration.

 

Tuesday August 28th

Some chocolate was given out.

A C-47 landed in the afternoon & landed a bit of supplies.

In the morning from 8.30 – 9.00 12 people were taken away by car to the airport & the planes zoomed over about 9.30.

 

 

De: <MTPrevite@aol.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet:

DONALD BISHOP and the World War II Museum video on LIBERATION

Date: mercredi 10 octobre 2007 20:06

 

From: Donald Bishop <_donbishop99@hotmail.com_

(mailto:donbishop99@hotmail.com) >

 

Date: October 9, 2007 9:58:16 PM  EDT

 

Subject:     World  War II Museum video on LIBERATION

 

 

In August, 2005, I almost decided I was too busy to go to what I thought would be a small  ceremony marking the 60th anniversary of the liberation of a camp where the  Japanese held Western civilian prisoners during World War II. 

But at the last minute, I travelled to Weifang in Shandong Province.  Many of you have heard me say it was one of the most memorable days of my life.  The highlight of the day was the speech by a member of the New Jersey legislature, Mary Taylor Previte, who had been a girl held in the Weihsien camp.  (The second highlight was to hear Joseph Metcalf talk about Eric Liddell.  You will remember him as the Scottish runner in "Chariots of Fire" who won a gold medal in the 1924 Olympics.)  When I was at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans, I mentioned Mary and the internment camp.  One  thing led to another and ...

 

 

 

 

_ http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/Mprevite/VideoWWIImuseum/Videos/p_film01.htm  _

( http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/Mprevite/VideoWWIImuseum/Videos/p_film01.htm )

 

I had to click on the link and the screen a few times to get it to work.

 

Regards, Don 

 

De: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Peter Bazire's diary,

Date: vendredi 19 octobre 2007 17:18

 

Hello,

Peter Bazire sent me a few new pages of his diary ----

Hope you enjoy them as much as I did :-))

Best regards,

Leopold

 

Wednesday August 29th

 

Tins were given out - our family (four, 4) 4 tins breakfast, 4 tins Campbell's Asparagus soup (2), Campbell's Chicken soup (2), 1 Big tin fruit salad, 1 Big tin Apricot, 2 Big tins fruit juice (Grape fruit). We opened a Supper & a juice.

 

 

 

Thursday August 30th

 

Theo's birthday.

 

A plane, which Tad said was a Jap, flew over about 12.00.

 

Boots were tried on at KI for your size; 7, 7½, 8, 9, 9½, 10,10½, 11, 11½. Then you went in a queue & registered your size. I first took 8 then decided to take 9.

 

In the afternoon they were given out from 3 – 4.30. Soon after they began giving out, 9 and over were allowed to go to the head of the long queue & get theirs first.

 

I found after that mine were slightly narrow so (I had 9D) I changed for 9E. I found in my boots a tin of Dubbing (sic) which I rubbed in. You can't polish after D unless you get a smooth surface & rub all over. I only want mine for rough use so I'm not going to. I polished my black ones & wore them in the evening. Most people are wearing their boots. I'm not wearing them till the colder weather.

 

 

 

Friday August 31st

 

In the morning some 20 GI's came by truck. They had come from the airport where they had landed in two C-47s.

 

There were amongst them Col. Weinburg – Cpt. Ashwood for entertainment. There were some very dark ones amongst them. One gave me a bullet .42. I was talking to them outside 35 where they had dumped their equipment. A lorry went to the airport for the supplies which mainly consisted of coffee.

 

There were games etc. & a cinema & films. Also magazines & a small library of books.

 

Some of the sick or next to go went in the morning e.g. Mrs. Legaspe, Hopegills etc.

 

 

 

Saturday September 1st

 

At 5.00 p.m. Col. Weinburg gave a short talk on the ball field to 15 & upward on what their purpose of coming here. Evacuation within 60 days – entertainment. He said that the very sick would go by air to SIAN & further & the rest of us would go to some port probably Shanghai or Tsingtao. Then Cpt. Ashwood read out a list of the stuff he had bought for entertainment.

 

In the evening was a sing song for youth in the church led by Cpt. Ashwood.

 

Sunday September 2nd

 

About 8.50 a.m. when playing in the band, we heard a drone & saw a plane coming. It was a B-29 with the engines & tail tip painted red. The wings looked very far back. The plane had a very clear drone & flew with grace.

 

When the band quit I got my father to do my 9 – 9.30 pumping.

 

By this time a second & a third appeared. I ran upstairs & found no school prayers. I put on my stockings & boots & went to the towers S-E of the hospital. While in the hospital putting on my boots I heard a crash & I thought that the plane had hit a chimney but it turned out only to be one of the things it dropped without parachute landed on the wire (telegraph). One loose tin went through the hospital screen window of the ladies ward. I was up the tower when a plane (there were about 5 by this time) coming low for us. One plane had already dropped a bit of stuff in camp so we took shelter under the tower & as I jumped from the wall I banged my teeth & nose against S. Houghton. My teeth bled for a while but I soon got over it.

 

Then I jumped over the wall & went through the wire & helped out in the fields. There was a lot of broken chocolate & fruit to eat as last time. It was very dangerous when the plane came because of the broken ones or ones which have no parachute. They had a very pretty colour scheme. Yellow crome (sic), blue, green (light & dark), red.

 

It wasn't so dangerous as last time; they had no drums, just the cardboard boxes strapped together. There were no medical or clothing. Just food.

 

I was sent back for tea which was taken over by the girls. I went to the front gate but they said no boys were wanted yet until the planes had gone so I walked back & went out through the tower S-E of the Hospital.

 

I went about ½ mile S.E. of the camp & then crossed the river & went to the field which had PW on it in white silk & black edges. There was as much chocolate as you wanted (broken). I went for a long walk by the river. A mile or more. I saw no white man around so I turned back in case of Balu (communists) who were thick in this part. I never realised in what danger I was in until I got amongst my own people again because these Balu would quite likely take people as hostages.

 

I then helped carry the stuff to the general dump. There were a lot of Chinese boys & men helping. They, having lived a coolie life, could carry much more than us. The stuff was assembled on the S side of the field by about 12.15. One man I had an argument said it would take at least 2 days to get the stuff in although I didn't think so. It was scattered in the same place as before & even on the E & S.E. side of our camp.

 

We carried the stuff from the main dump to the church & the parachutes to the moongate.

 

Mr. Waters gave chocolate to the children who happened to be near the church. I got a good lot.

 

The ladies opened the broken fruit tins & we had it for supper.

 

The services had to be in 35 because the church was full of stuff.

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Fw: calling cards,

Date: jeudi 25 octobre 2007 4:33

 

Dear Ex-Weihsieners in Australia and others.

This appears to be what is happening (or not) about Lucy Lu's visit to Australia. Joyce Bradbury.

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Pander

To: Joyce Bradbury- Cook

Cc: Zandy ; Janette & Pierre @ home

Sent: Sunday, October 21, 2007 7:55 PM

Subject: calling cards,

 

Dear Joyce,

I read on Topica that you were waiting for the Weifang TV-team to come and interview you in Australia and New Zealand. They told me that they were going to Hong Kong but their trip to Australia was not yet scheduled for sure --- (they said---)

As attachment I thought that you would be interested in their business-cards ---

I also added the few pictures (with the captions) we took when they came to visit us in Belgium: http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/60YearsAfter/SlideShow/WeifangTV/index.htm  (click on the link). I hope that I will get a few photos taken in England too --- (they passed there before comming to Belgium) ---

Hope all's OK in Australia,

Leopold

 

De: "Alexander Strangman" <dzijen@bigpond.net.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Peter's diary!

Date: jeudi 25 octobre 2007 8:08

 

To Peter Bazire,

 

It has been a real joy to read those pages, from the diary of a young teenager (in his own words) as he saw those events of his day unfold, step by step!

 

It 'brings home' to me the sad reality, when recalling my 930 odd days at Weihsien, how much of the simple details of my daily routine I've actually clean forgotten!

 

We were warned early of the risks of 'taking an unboiled drink' from those deadly wells!...........So, what did I do to quench my thirst on some of those hot days?

During some of those pumping sessions or through the non stop exertions of the soccer or hockey games............. I 'ran on dry' there, obviously?

 

There weren't many taps with running water 'dotted' around the compound, either..........so, where did we wash our hands through the day?  Did we use soap?   I'm damned if I can remember!

 

Why didn't I also (or even more of us) think of recording some of the (at least) notable happenings in our daily 'camp' existence ?   We would have had many more accurate stories to add to our interesting "Days of Internment" saga!

 

So if you have got more to share, I for one would certainly enjoy reading them!

Keep up the good work, Peter.

Zandy

 

De: "Joyce Cook" <bobjoyce@tpg.com.au>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Peter's diary!

Date: jeudi 25 octobre 2007 9:44

 

I remember Sunlight soap (one cake per month, correct me if I am wrong about the quantity issued) for everything but I used Lysol to clean the lavatories which was my first job when I turned 14. I do like the diary entries and I hope they keep on coming. I kept an autograph book with many signatures and comments of internees and of a lot of nuns and priests that I still have. I also have all of the rescuing parachutists' autographs and the signature of John A. Wagoner, Captpc (sic) (parachute corps?) but I do not remember who he was although he signed with the parachutists.  Can anyone identify this person? Incidentally Sunlight soap can still be bought in Sydney.  Joyce Bradbury.

 

 

De: "David Birch" <gdavidbirch@yahoo.com>

À: <weihsien@topica.com>

Objet: Re: Peter's diary!

Date: vendredi 26 octobre 2007 0:19

 

Thank you to Peter, Joyce and Zandy for the wonderful (and valuable) reminiscing about those amazing days of long ago - over 60 years now!

 

Peter, who encouraged you to keep that marvelous diary? They deserve a Nobel Prize for something - and that's for certain!  Another young lad who kept some remarkably detailed records of those incredible days was David Allen. David and his wife Dorothy (not an internee) live about an hour and a half's drive from our home in New Westminster. David has been a US citizen for many years now and lives in retirement in Mt Vernon, Washington. I think much of David's records are contained in the letters he wrote to his parents - his mother faithfully kept every single letter, and he has them all now!

 

I have a few copies of letters I wrote home to my parents. I will dig them out some day soon and type them out so that you can enjoy my memories too. I recollect writing about my thirteenth birthday and that my little brother John gave me a chrysalis for a present - we savoured the very little things more than many of today's kids savour their lavish and expensive gifts I believe!

 

So interesting, Joyce, to learn of your increased responsibilities upon turning fourteen!