From: <gregleck@epix.net>

Sent: Friday, January 02, 2009 3:40 AM

Subject: Weihsien film footage

 

Ø      I've just returned from a trip to NARA and found a few documents
> regarding Weihsien which I did not dig up whilst researching my book. 
> Once I get things in order I will probably pass them on to Leopold to
> add to his site.
>
> On a related topic, I have finally, thanks to the recent release of
OSS
> personnel records, identified the Philip Malmstedt who was a film
> cameraman and may have taken film footage of Weihsien in the days after
> liberation.  Pamela Masters has mentioned this person and the film he
> shot in August 1945.  Knowing he was a member of the
OSS helps to narrow
> down the area where the film could be held at
NARA.
>
> Greg Leck

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2009 12:27 AM

Subject: film footage from World War II

 

Troy Sacquety, our premier researcher about the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), has recommended the following site http://www.realmilitaryflix.com/  

 

You'll find fascinating real life footage here -- including about the OSS.   Five of our seven liberators -- Major Stanley Staiger,  Jim Moore, Tad Nagaki, Ray Hanchulak, and  Peter Orlich  --  were members of OSS.

 

Happy New Year.

 

Mary Previte

 

From: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2009 12:34 PM

Subject: Re: Weihsien film footage

 

Ø      Dear Greg,
> Thanks for helping me keep the website alive. New info is always welcome and
> especially photos, documents and even short films ---
> Best regards,
> Leopold

 

From: "Dusty Knisely" <jknisely@paonline.com>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2009 11:05 PM

Subject: Re: Weihsien film footage

 

Ø      Greg, NARA is a town in Japan to me.  Is that in Bethsesda?  We had a
> Swedish friend who came in and took pictures right after liberation and
> before we left on the train for
Tsingtao.  They confiscated the pictures and
> maybe video when the military man returned to the
US>  As you look again.
> PLEASE see if any of this got in with other things.  I have tried to find
> them and have never had any good fortune.  Hopefully,  Georgie Knisely
> They were pictures of life in camp.

 

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2009 7:09 PM

Subject: Fw: The Jap's uniform

 

Remember the Jap's uniform (in the guard tower)?

Best regards,

Leopold

 

----- Original Message -----

From: kim smith

To: Pander

Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2009 4:07 PM

Subject: Re: The Jap's uniform

 

"After reading the (to me) fascinating controversies here, I must tell everyone thta Dad was a STICKLER about accuracy.  I guarantee he took no artistic license with the color, guns, caps etc.  As I mentioned in my just-previous E-mail, when doing historical commisions much later in life, he would get permission to inspect inside the seams of historical uniforms to see the unfaded (or less-faded) color of the original cloth.  He thus changed the historical record on at least one instance.  My mother, a native French speaker, once accompanied Dad on research for  project on the French and Indian war, looking at documents written in French.  Mom found a punctuation error, which had resulted in an historical figure's name coming down through history, inaccurately!

Dad would have wanted to record the soldier in the watchtower as he was, and only employed his vivid imagination to the thousands of illustrations he did for the Saturday Evening Post and all the other highly illustrated magazines in the fifties.

Dad also took hundreds of photographs, which Leopold will publish for y'all when I get to burning them and sending them to him.  The Japanese in the pictures (there are also many Chinese soldiers) are almost all, if not all, wearing the kind of hat you see in the painting.  I don't offhand remember seeing any helmets, though I would ave to review the pics.

I would also like to say that Dad was
OSS in China.  He was not a war correspondent per se, but was sent a couple of days after the liberation to record the action.  He spent most of his time in China in Kunming doing Morale Operations".


Leopold, would you publish the above along with the other comments I have read?  I'm not sure how to connect to this thread.  I'd love to stay conneted to that thread.

Also, if people are interested, they might want to see some of Dad's other work, much of which is historical at these links:


Today's Inspiration, the blog which first ran a week of Dad's illustration.  Here is a link to the first day, and if you then go to the April 2008 links to the right of the page, you will get the rest of the week

http://todaysinspiration.blogspot.com/2008/03/william-smith-fine-painter-robert.html


Here is the link to the same blog, but the week where Leif focuses on Dad's work in China liberating Weihsien civilian internship camp at the end of the war:

http://todaysinspiration.blogspot.com/2008/11/william-smith-terrible-picture-of.html


Here is Davis Apatoff's homage to Dad's China work, just scroll down to August 10th:


http://illustrationart.blogspot.com/2008_08_01_archive.html



There will be more of Dad's work soon on the web, and I am in the process of making a Wikipedia entry,


Very best to you,

Kim



--- On Tue, 1/6/09, Pander <pander.nl@skynet.be> wrote:

From: Pander <pander.nl@skynet.be>
Subject: The Jap's uniform
To: "Kim Smith" <kim5888@sbcglobal.net>
Cc: "Janette & Pierre @ home" <pierre.ley@pandora.be>
Date:
Tuesday, January 6, 2009, 5:08 AM

Dear Kim,

Here is an amusing link to read ---- It is about the colour of the Jap's uniform & nobody seemd to agree about it and  now, we finally have your dad's painting in colour --- thanks to your blog !

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/TedPearson/text/JapUniform.htm

 

all the best,

Leopold

 

From: Albert de Zutter

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2009 8:16 PM

Subject: Re: Fw: The Jap's uniform

 

I have consistently  maintained that the Japanese guards wore olive green uniforms and were army, and not consular police. There was a civilian authority, and in one of the writings of an American missionary who was repatriated in September of 1943 is the statement that there was disagreement between the Japanese civilian and military authorities.

 

Further evidence that our guards were army can be found in Father Scanlan's writings in the chapter where he describes his transfer from Weihsien to Peking. There he says that the guards accompanying his group from Weihsien were angry because their prisoners were transferred to consular police in Peking rather than to army personnel, as they were.

 

Albert de Zutter

 

From: Ron Bridge

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2009 10:47 PM

Subject: RE: The Japanese uniform in Weihsien

 

 

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Let us settle this saga once and for all. I have had numerous examples during the past ten years when I have been establishing the names of thsoe interned or who were military PoWS of Japan that the only truly reliable source of information was contemporary records and documentation. Human Memory is selective and often blind in spots. Books written in the 1950's are accurate but their was a tendency to use pseudonyms there was then a dearth until the late 1980s and 1990 where quite clearly memory failure has occurred

 

in November 1943 a repatriated Canadian (ex Gripsholm) from Weihsien filed a report for the British Commonwealth Governments reported that the Camp Commandant had been the Japanese Vice Consul in Honolulu that is was of limited intelligence, incompetent and spoke no english but that the police officials were correct in their behavior towards internees. ( This is filed under CO.910/26 at the UK National Archives Kew)

in March 1944  The Swiss consul filed a report through the Swiss Consul General in in Shanghai. This cites that the Commandant was Mr Tsukigawa who had been Vice Consul in HOnolulu on 08Dec45. and had reported that he had had a very rough time and that was why the camp was in Shantong Provimnce away from  civilisation. He reported to the Japanese Consul General in Tsingtao where all major decisions were taken. The Japanese Styaff of the Camp is given as 1 Commandant, 4 Heads of Departments, 3 Police Officers and a varying number of policemen between 30 and 40. The original of this document is Desptach NO 7500 filed at NARA ( US National Archives)

 

in August 1945 the Japanese submitted documents to General MacArthur's staff during the discussions regarding the surrender. Among those is a list of all POW/Civlian INternee Camps with their controlling authority Weihsien is shown to be under the DEpartment of Foreign Affairs ( I have seen the copy in the UK National Archives Kew but I ams sure the same document will be availble in NARA.

 

in September 1945 the Duck Mission refers to the Japanese Consular POlice authorities representin the Japanese Government. Due to lack of US Manpower the Japanese were to remain responsible for gurading the Camp walls. .... Major Staiger met the Chief of Consular Police Koyanagi... and then met Mr Izu of the Japanese Consular Service who was the Camp Commandant.at NARA ( US National Archives) and also contained in Leopold's

Web site.

 

Having said that I have no doubt that by 1944 Japanese who were no longer fit for Combat duties were re-assigned to the Consular police  as camp guards, but that did not mean to say that they were still in the MIlitary.

 

The Japanese Consular Police Uniform was black serge ( for Temperate winters and Cold climates) and they wore a khaki/green cotton summer uniform in the trpoics and in the Temperate Summer months.

 

I my dealing with the Japanese National Archives Weihsien which they had by different name as they could not decypher the characters is in the Foreign Office Archives, other camps are under the Japanese  Navy and Japanese Army and those in Japan under the MInistry of Internal Affairs.

 

From: grannydavies@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2009 2:08 AM

Subject: Re: The Japanese uniform in Weihsien

 

The  control of the Japanese guarding Weihsien was military.not consular.We had proof  when my father Algernon F. Evans was dying in camp.My sister and her husband the Danish consul tried repeatedly to get in to see him They were allowed in briefly by the commandant twice.The Japanese consul in Tientsin was a friend,He gave my sister a  3month pass to come to weihsien but informed them that he did not have jurisdiction of the military camp of Weihsien.Phyllis Evans Davies

 

From: Ron Bridge

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2009 11:04 AM

Subject: RE: The Japanese uniform in Weihsien

 

It is pretty obvious that 64 years later nobody is going to agree despite the overwelming evidnce both pictorial and documentarythat it was Consular POlice. The quote cited below  by Phyllis Davies is effectively correct as the jurisdiction was under the Tsingtao Consul General.

 

But I close matters by quoting yet another report from the debrieifng of the Gripsholm evacuees in NOvember 1943 " Discipline generally was under the control of a retired Japanese NCO who had under him 40 Japanese Consular police."

 

As far as I am concerned having examined the surrender documents, the contemporary camp documents inclduing reports by the SWiss Consuls and International Red Cross raised at the time I am satisfied that they were Consular police in Weihsien. Incidently having studied the broader picture of all Camps

Shanghai all ten camps under civil Control except Haiphong Road and Kiangwan where military control and all inmates even if civilian at beginning of the war considered military PoWS and granted rank of Sergeant.

Hongkong initially military control transferred to civil in  late 1942 reveretd to military a year later.

Singapore military control

Burma military control

NEI military control except Celebes where Naval Control.

Rgds

Ron

 

From: Albert de Zutter

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2009 1:50 PM

Subject: RE: The Japanese uniform in Weihsien

 

I am curious as to whether you, Ron Bridge, were an inmate at the camp, or is all of your information from documents? I grew up in Tsingtao, which was occupied by the Japanese army in 1938, when I was 6 years old. The Japanese soldiers were in our view from then on. I was 10-plus when we were interned in Tsingtao and 13 when we were liberated. I never saw a black uniform at Weihsien, nor did I see a dark blue uniform as some have maintained. I cited the adult testimony of an American missionary lady who was repatriated and the passage in Father Scanlan's book in which he depicts the guards from Weihsien who accompanied his groups to Peking as being angry at having to give up their prisoners to consular police. My direct experience bolstered by that of these two adults is proof enough for me.

 

Albert de Zutter

 

From: Ron Bridge

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2009 10:28 PM

Subject: RE: The Japanese uniform in Weihsien

 

Albert,
1 I am not just an intersted academic, I was in Weihsien Block42/Room 6 until Sep 43 when we moved to Block 13 Rooms 10 & 11. I would also refer you to Leopold's web site.

2 When I said Black they could have been mid-night blue.

3 I have cited onyl a few official sources.

4 I leave you all with the thought of a quote from " Shantung Compound" written by Langdon Gilkeyin 1966 when his memory would have been fresh although he uses pseudonyms for the Camp Inmates I quote:

" We were neither in Japan nor in "enemy" territory - we were in part of China which was occupied or "puppet" territory, held by the Japanese since 1937, and so maintaining at least nominal diplomatic realations with Japan. Thus we were under the Consular Service rather than the Army or the Military poLICE As a result civilian diplomatic officials were in charge of us. OUR GUARDS WERE A PART OF THE CONSULAR GUARD RATHER THAN  SOLDIERS IN THE REGULAR ARMY."(RWB My capitals) it goes on to describe why Weihsien inmates were handled diferently to the "folks" in the Philipines East Idnies or Singapore.  ( for those with a copy of Gilkey's Shantung Compound it is on page 42)

5 As at no source from written by inmates during and after the war, red cross reports and surrender documents does any mention made opf the guards being Japanese army other than by contributors to this Topica Bulletin. I consider the case proven beyond any reasonable doubt.

Rgds

Ron Bridge

PS I leave you with the thought that I have been Vice Chairman 1997-2000 and Chairman 2001 of the Association of British Civil Internees Far East Region and have spent  many many hours in studying the whole issue of internment in the Far East have been in constant dialogue with the UK Government over an ex gratia payment including 3 High Court and 3 Appeal Court cases against the Ministry of Defence. The the British ex internjees who are readers of this column will know what that entailed.

 

From: Albert de Zutter

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2009 10:40 PM

Subject: RE: The Japanese uniform in Weihsien

 

Thank you for the information. You have some good sources to cite and so have I. I have no doubt that the consular service was technically in charge and that there was a civilian authority. But I equally have no doubt that the guards were military personnel.

 

 

From: David Birch

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2009 8:23 PM

Subject: RE: The Japanese uniform in Weihsien

 

Thank you for this interesting discussion. As with Ron Bridge and Albert de Zutter, I was interned by the Japanese at the Civilian Assembly Center (read Concentration Camp) until the end of World War II. I was thirteen years and nine months of age in August 1945 when the American paratroopers dropped to us from the B24 Liberator plane.

As you mention, Ron, after some sixty-plus years our memories of those days are not as clear as they must have been even forty or fifty years ago. But there are a couple of things that I do remember clearly today.

One is that in the
Chefoo School, we always referred to the head man over the Japanese guards as the CHIEF OF POLICE. Never as the commandant. But he may well have had to report to some fairly high-level official with the Japanese army. The reason I think this may have been the case is that I can still recall a little group of officers (the head man may have been a colonel) visiting our camp and stalking about doing some kind of an inspection which probably did not last more than a couple of hours and may have been largely for show. Since I was first interned at Chefoo, in 1942 and transferred with the Chefoo contingent to Weihsien in September 1943, I no longer am able to recall whether this military inspection took place at Chefoo or Weihsien.

I do clearly recall that the uniforms worn by the army 'brass' were of the khaki variety.

I do know that the uniforms worn by our camp guards were different in color. They were NOT khaki in my recollection as the army uniforms were. I've always seemed to recall them as a dark 'navy' blue color, but certainly they may have been black.

I would respectfully suggest that I don't really think this really matters very much. It's sort of like the argument over which end of the boiled egg should be uppermost in the egg cup, the pointy end or the rounded end.  In one of his books, Norman Cliff refers to the Japanese guards as consular police.

Sincerely
David

 

From: Dwight W. Whipple

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2009 9:15 PM

Subject: RE: The Japanese uniform in Weihsien

 

The reason for the rounded end of the egg pointing up is so that the spoon fits better into it.

~Dwight

 

From: David Birch

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2009 10:05 PM

Subject: RE: The Japanese uniform in Weihsien

 

Ha, ha !!!  That's quite interesting! Hadn't heard that explanation before!  I do however recall reading  in "Gulliver's Travels" that quite a hubbub took place between two factions in one of the kingdoms. The row was all over the question of which end of the boiled egg should be broken in order to eat the egg.

Until now, I knew nothing of the real significance of preference of one end over the other!

Thanks Dwight!

David

 

From: Albert de Zutter

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 12:15 AM

Subject: RE: The Japanese uniform in Weihsien

 

I have had two careers in my life -- a journalist twice and, in between, a psychotherapist for 20 years. Both have helped me understand the human condition. I understand the urge to place oneself "above the fray," and take a bemused, superior position. I also understand the urge to truthful accuracy -- a trait  I recognize and very much respect in Ron Bridge. Although the details of our internment hardly make any difference now (they can't affect how I relate to my children or grandchildren, for example), they are interesting to us -- we the survivors of what has been a turning point in our upbringing, especially those who underwent the experience for the full 35-36 months, in contrast to those who were repatriated in September of 1943. Those two additional winters in Weihsien brought us to the brink of extinction and imposed two more years of not knowing what in heaven or earth was to become of us. That last winter was especially brutal, with all our clothes outgrown and worn out, not enough coal to keep our heating stoves burning, and food supply deteriorating from its already inadequate level.

 

Like David Birch, I was 13-plus when our seven rescuers dropped out of that B-24. I rushed out, barefoot and clad only in shorts, and I was not frightened by the sight of .45 caliber Tommy Guns pointed at us -- they were the "good guys," after all. I didn't know till a few years ago that the Japanese guards had orders to kill us all, and I'm glad they did not. I happen to think, without definite proof, that they would not have done so, but then, I'm kind of an optimist. Anyway, here we are, as Ron said, 64 years (not quite) later. What does it matter what color uniforms the guards were wearing? Not a damn bit. But it matters to me that I saw Japanese army uniforms from the time I was six years old till the end of the concentration camp experience, and I saw no difference between those I saw in Tsingtao starting in January of 1938 until the end of our imprisonment in 1945. I never saw a black or dark blue uniform in Weihsien, and I have great difficulty picturing "King Kong" in anything but army olive drab.

 

In reply to David, the vast majority of Weihsien prisoners NEVER referred to the commandant as "police chief." I have noticed that it is only Chefoo kids (a small minority), and some Peking personnel who insist that we were guarded by "consular police." Both groups encountered "consular police" before they arrived at Weihsien, and I believe it is a well-known psychological phenomenon that we tend to see what we expect. I never heard of the term "consular police" in relation to the Japanese occupation and our experience at Weihsien before I read it on this site. Sgt. "Pushindi" sure as hell was not a diplomat.

 

So, snicker if you will, but Ron Bridge, a researcher, and I, a journalist, still care about accuracy. And I wish more people did.

 

Albert de Zutter

 

From: Joyce Cook

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, January 10, 2009 5:17 AM

 

The Jap officers who came to our house in Tsingtao immediately after Pearl Harbour (albeit one was Korean) wore dark coloured uniforms. They attached a sign to our house indicating we were 'British - enemy'. 

 

 Later we went to WeiHsien being the first group to arrive there and one of the last to leave after liberation. 

 

My recollection of the guards there is that they wore khaki uniforms.

 

After some time in the camp my father was astonished to meet a former civilian business acquaintance of his from Tsingtao who had become the new Commandant of WeiHsien Camp.  He was Koyonagi.  I think I only saw him once later in the camp but I remember my father saying to my mother, "Guess who I met today,Koyonagi, he's the new commandant of the camp." My mother was surprised and they spoke about him as a business acquaintence of my father pre war in Tsingtao. who suddenly appeared as the camp commander.Pop was manager of Jardine Matheson before the War in Tsingtao. He actually visited pop and gave him eggs and watermelon. He was very friendly. Dad asked him not to bring any more food to us as it would not look good. Dad knew him as a businessman and not an Army officer and was very surprised to see him as an officer..The  Chinese police in Tsingtao pre war wore black uniforms as  I remember.

Joyce Bradbury

 

From: Dusty Knisely

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, January 11, 2009 5:13 AM

Subject: Re: The Japanese uniform in Weihsien

 

Dwight, I love the egg answer, makes sense to me.  Georgie Reinbrecht Knisely

 

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, January 16, 2009 11:23 AM

Subject: Weihsien & Unit-731

 

Hello,

My little sister, Mary-Lou, born in camp (7 July, 1944) graduated from Brussels University (U.L.B.) as a journalist. Before she died, we (her family) knew that she was preparing to write a book about what she called then: “our family saga in the Far East”. Being born in Weihsien made her to be very interested on the subject and I know that she had had long conversations about that with her mother.

She once told me that Father DeJaegher knew!

Knew what?

She told me to read Father deJaegher’s chapter about Weihsien and that it had something to do with Unit-731.

 

Here is the extract (last pages …) http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/rdjaegher/text/ChapterXVIII.htm

“He and two other camp guards were very young idealistic men who had been inflamed by the propaganda of their own militarists and induced to throw themselves into this "great and honourable war." They were wounded in the fighting on the Malay Peninsula, and their disillusionment was complete after their experiences there.  They had grown more and more bitterly opposed to the war until they were really fanatical pacifists when I encountered them in camp, as violently anti-war as they had been for it before they left home.  It was not too hard to win these young men over to our side and, while they remained Japanese soldiers, under military jurisdiction, doing their duty as guards, they had no heart for their work and helped us enormously.  They began to give us all kinds of information, and of course I encouraged them, as did the Gervasi.  It was thus I learned that the war was not going well and that plans were under way to move the various interment camps scattered all over the Pacific area.  The prisoners in the Philippine camps were to be sent either to Hong Kong or Japan; the Hong Kong camps were to be moved to Shanghai, the Shanghai camps to Peiping, the Peiping camps to Mukden.  Of course the military prisoners in these places, as well as the civil internees, would be moved, and the leapfrogging arrangement was to gain time and hold onto as many of these captives of war as possible, as long as possible, for bargaining purposes.

Since we would be included in the Peiping grouping, we would inevitably go to Mukden.  I knew it would be extremely bad for us if this move went through, particularly for the women, because Mukden is a rugged place at all times and devastatingly cold and bleak in winter.  I realized we would have to do something, and so did the committee in whom I confided my news.  We made emergency contact with the guerrillas and inquired how long it would take them to bomb the railway from Tsinan to Tsingtao, the road through which we would have to be evacuated.  The word came back quickly, and it was cheering.  They would need only one day's notice.  Knowing we could always count on that, and that we need never have to move, we relaxed.

It was not just messages like ------- “

 

--- all camps in Asia were to be moved “one step” Northwards !! ?? Why?

Nowadays, we know much more about Unit-731 situated near Harbin in Manchuria. Not a single prisoner survived from that camp, a sinister place where medical experimentations were made on human bodies. Mostly Chinese, Russians and POWs from Mukden.

Father DeJaegher was very fluent in Chinese and very well accepted by the Chinese population. He was also very well informed as to what was going on in many parts of China during the war, (as well as before and after the war). Could he have had any knowledge of the atrocities going on in Harbin? Unit-731? Could he have known that POWs from Mukden were disappearing to be dissected in the Japs’ laboratories of Unit-731?

It seems to me that he must have known that everything possible had to be done to prevent us – civilian captives in Weihsien – from going up North. To Mukden which is very close to Harbin --- and from there to Unit 731. Not only for the climate (as he writes) but also for our lives … )

We were all in relatively good health and excellent material for the Japs’ experimentations on humans. Furthermore there were many children in our group.

 

A question to our historians:

Our Japanese captors could exterminate us at any time & place they wished. Historians have found written orders for that.

Do you think that my hypothesis about Unit-731 is plausible?

Best regards,

Leopold

 

From: Fred & Coral Dreggs

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, January 17, 2009 2:37 AM

Subject: Re: Weihsien & Unit-731

 

Dear Leopold,

 

To cut a long story short, there are 491,000 pages on the internet dealing with the subject "Unit - 731". I have never heard of it and am now  astonished to read that a unit such as that really did exist and has dreadful matters attached to it reminiscent of Dr. Mengles(?) in German concentration camps etc. I have not yet read what has appeared on the net but am bringing this to the attention of readers.

 

Regards.. Fred aka Alfie

 

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, January 17, 2009 10:05 AM

Subject: Re: Weihsien & Unit-731

 

Dear Everybody,

http://www.dailymotion.com/relevance/search/unit%C3%A9+731/video/x4emmn_les-fantomes-de-l-unite-731-part1_politics

This URL brings you to a recent & interesting TV documentary about the subject. Its in French but there are many other videos in English, as Fred mentions in his message. First time I heard of 731 ---- must have been in the mid-eighties. It's a real nightmare!

Best regards,

Leopold

 

From: Ron Bridge

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, January 17, 2009 10:38 AM

Subject: RE: Weihsien & Unit-731

 

Unit 731 is one thing but to link it with Weihsien is ridiculous. I have seen much on Unit 731 and at no time did Weihsien feature as a possible source of  humans for laboratory experimental  use.

I have just read through all the reports written both during the war and by the Duck and other release teams and there is no mention whatsoever of a move to Mukden.

Readers of this bulletin board should realise that the whole of all internment camps lived on rumour it is a very natural human activity and when there is no auhtoriative news of events they are invented and then embellished at each telling, with optimists giving one slant followed by pessimists turning it round.

Ron

 

From: Albert de Zutter

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, January 18, 2009 6:23 AM

Subject: RE: Weihsien & Unit-731

 

I don't think it's correct to dismiss Leopold's hypothesis about Weihsien and Unit 731 as "ridiculous." The two soldiers cited in the passage of Father De Jaegher's book did say there was a plan to move all the camps toward the north, and since we were the "Peking group," north for us would have meant Mukden. Whether or not that was to have been our fate, I think it was very fortunate that the war ended when it did and that the Duck Mission reached us three days after the cessation of hostilities.  Had the war continued over another winter, many of us would not have survived anyway, whether from the cold and malnutrition in Weihsien or under the tender mercies of the Japanese "Doctors Mengele" in Mukden. Or, for that metter in just another camp in that frozen part of the world.

 

Albert de Zutter

 

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, January 18, 2009 12:18 PM

Subject: Re: Weihsien & Unit-731

 

Dear Ron,

Nonsense?

I don’t think so.

The author was a very intelligent man. His book was written after the war and he had ample time to correct and modify his prose before the book was published. He could have not written this short paragraph about Mukden and his chapter about Weihsien would have been just as spicy as it is now.

The fact is that he wrote that paragraph and that he explicitly mentions “Mukden” three times.

What message did he want to send us?

After the war and as a Catholic priest he was close to the entourage of Mr.  & Mrs. Chiang Kai-shek and certainly had knowledge of a lot of very confidential information. The negotiations for the possession of all the scientific data concerning 731 took place then. All that was “Top Secret” and of course he couldn’t write that in his book. He would have been immediately censored.

Furthermore, when the war ended, the Japanese destroyed Unit-731 and with it --- all the compromising documents were burnt in Manchuria as well as in Japan. The whole episode was classified “Top Secret” in Japan and in the US.

No wonder you can’t read any official report about this.

---

So, if Father DeJaegher writes that we could have been sent to Mukden, I believe him. Once in a POW camp in Mukden, whether you are a civilian or a military --- you become a potential candidate for Unit-731. That’s just pure logic!

I hope that one day; a historian will find some written evidence about all this.

Not all has been said about WWII and some things, we will never know.

Best regards,

Leopold

 

From: David Birch

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, January 19, 2009 3:55 AM

Subject: RE: Weihsien & Unit-731

 

As far as I am concerned, I'll go with Ron Bridge. He is one of the very most well-informed people on the whole subject of Japanese internment camps in the Far East that I know about. And, of course, he was one of our fellow prisoners, as a boy, in Weihsien!
In fact through his work as a high executive with the ABCIFER organization, I among thousands of others who were prisoners of the Japanese, in the
Far East, received thousands of dollars of special Ex Gratia grants from the British Government.

Yes it is true, of course, that we were very fortunate that the war ended when it did and that we were rescued promptly by Major Staiger and his men.  But I don't think we were in any danger of being used as human guinea pigs by ghoulish Japanese versions of depraved Nazi medical men! I think that is sheer speculation with no real basis in provable fact.

David

 

From: <gregleck@epix.net>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2009 4:19 AM

Subject: ONI report on Weihsien

 

Ø      I've uncovered a report from the Office of Naval Intelligence based on
> an interview with a missionary internee who was part of the 1943
> exchange.  I'll pass it on to Leopold for the website.
>
> In it, the missionary tries to make the case that a raid could be made
> (long before the end of the war was in sight) to free the internees. 
> This had just been done in the
Philippines.
>
> I have never come across any primary source documents to suggest that
> this was seriously considered (the Chinese had their own wild scheme to
> free Weihsien) but I suspect that intelligence like this was available
> to the Duck Mission.
>
> I also came across a list of equipment carried by members of the various
> humanitarian missions.
>

 

From: Gay Talbot Stratford

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2009 4:27 PM

Subject: Re: Weihsien & Unit-731

 

Dear Friends,

The fecent flurry of e-mails concermimg Weihsien and Mukden is interesting.

There is no doubt that Father de Jaegher was an intelligent man and a fine  priest. He and his 'news team' risked' their lives to bring news and hope to the adults in camp. He was an unsung hero, and I have no difficulty in believing what he said.

Facts are facts of course, but all the facts are not yet in-- and may never be.

One of our sons is married to a Japanese girl who knew nothing about the war, except for the dropping of the atomic bombs. But in recent years an exhibit of camp 731 has been touring Japan. The place did exist ,and it was horrendous. Thousands of Chinese were not as lucky as we were.

Gay Talbot Stratford-----

 

From: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2009 5:55 PM

Subject: Re: ONI report on Weihsien

 

Ø      Dear Greg,
> I'd gladly add that document to what we already have --- mostly thanks to
> Norman Cliff's scrap-books.
>
http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/NormanCliff/history/DOCUMENTS/1944-Oct18-TiptonHummel/ConditionsInWeihsien.htm
> On the website, I added a short cut on the main frame:
> "Documents&Archives" ----
> Best regards,
> Leopold

 

From: rod miller

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2009 5:23 AM

Subject: Situation reports Chinese camps

 

Hello

I'm not sure how interested you are but in the file below there are some references to Weihsien.
Due to the file title you probably haven't seen them before.
There are daily sitrep reports for August 1945.
If you want to look at these files in date order you start at the back and work your way to the front.
Pages 224 to 197 have mentions and there maybe others as I didn't go right through it.
Page 25-28 is a list of Australians at Weihsien.
 
For the link below to work you will have to be logged into the Australian National Archives as a guest
http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/recordsearch/index.aspx

Then click the link below.

http://naa12.naa.gov.au/scripts/imagine.asp?B=237699&I=1&SE=1

Title
Australian Prisoners of War and Internees.
Series number
A4144 Control symbol
810/1945 Contents date range
1944 - 1945
 
Access status
OpenLocation
Canberra
Barcode
237699

Regards
Rod

 

From: Ron Bridge

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2009 2:31 PM

Subject: RE: Situation reports Chinese camps

 

Rod,

Many thanks I had seen some of the messages as they were in the UK National Archives. But as always there were some nuggets.

RGds
Ron

 

From: Ron Bridge

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2009 9:38 PM

Subject: RE: Situation reports Chinese camps

 

Rod,

Just as a matter of info I am now understandign why there were so many discrepancies in numbers the NAA  documnets referred to give a host of Australians many of whom I knew or were friends of my garndparents or parents and the Camp documnet list as British (UK) and many of the children in the China Inland Mission SChool Chefoo who were in Weihsien and who had bee born in China of Australian parents have UK Birth Certificates. It could be belt and braces as with Australia emerging on it's own in the Commonwealth post the 1931 conference British enjoyed extra-territoriality and were not sbject to Chinese law where there was some doubt re Commonwealth Countries.

Thanks again thinking of me

Rgds
Ron

 

From: rod miller

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2009 11:59 PM

Subject: RE: Situation reports Chinese camps

 

Ron

The reason I stumbled across this file is because I was researching the Australian POWs at
Hainan.
Between January and September 1942 the Australian internees in
China were probably valuable to the Japanese.
Australia had a diplomat in China Sir Frederick Eggleston. He arrived in Chungking in October 1941 and remained until 1944.
Its a complicated story to do with the British exchange but the Japanese desperately needed 800 Japanese we had interned in
Australia. I mention them in my book. I'm pretty sure that our Prime Minister, John Curtin, put his foot down and said if it wasn't reciprocal
they weren't getting them. 

At
07:38 AM 1/25/2009, you wrote:

Rod,
Just as a matter of info I am now understandign why there were so many discrepancies in numbers the NAA  documnets referred to give a host of Australians many of whom I knew or were friends of my garndparents or parents and the Camp documnet list as British (UK) and many of the children in the China Inland Mission SChool Chefoo who were in Weihsien and who had bee born in China of Australian parents have UK Birth Certificates.


This would be the trick, as for the exchange the British Government would be counting the heads as British where as the Australian Government would be counting them as Australian. I believe it was all about numbers and who was going to be returned on the exchange, people the British Government wanted, or people the Australian Government wanted. As you've pointed out to me before, in the British files people from the dominions were all named as British. The thing is
Australia held the whip hand for although we weren't negotiating the exchange we had the internees the Japanese desperately needed.


It could be belt and braces as with Australia emerging on it's own in the Commonwealth post the 1931 conference British enjoyed extra-territoriality and were not sbject to Chinese law where there was some doubt re Commonwealth Countries.


Have a look at
http://www.passports.gov.au/Web/PassportHistory.aspx The words 'Australian Passport' replaced 'British Passport' on the cover of an Australian passport in 1949. No wonder the Japanese were confused.


Thanks again thinking of me


You survivors of Weihsien are living history. Like all internees you can tell us what happened, which is terribly important, but you can't tell us why it happened. It is the "Why" factor that interests me.

I enjoy the lively debate in here. I can tell you that the Rabaul nurses who were interned in
Japan, although completely different to you in the respect that there was only 19 of them, had many different guards, police, army and navy.

 I think historian Margaret MacMillan
http://www.margaretmacmillan.com/index.html summed it up nicely during a recent visit to Australia.

History is a process, and there is not one truth about the past, just as there is not one truth about the present. It will depend in part where you're looking at it from. What we have to try and do, in both history and in confronting the present, is recognise that our view is a limited one and it may not be the only one. And try and be aware of other angles and other aspects. We have to sort out what people think they believe and what we think we believe about the past from what actually happened. We have views on the past which are simply not borne out by the evidence. And I think that's what good history does, it respects the evidence and it tries to deal with evidence that doesn't fit in to a particular picture.

Maybe a lesson in that for all of us...
 
If I find anything else I'll let you know.

Regards
Rod

 

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2009 9:53 AM

Subject: Re: Situation reports Chinese camps

 

Dear Rod,

I too appreciated your last messages. The Australian archive link is a very interesting one. I took out the documents about Weihsien and will transfer them to the Weihsien-Paintings website. That will come in the “Documents & Archive’s” chapter I don’t know how yet --- but I’ll find a way.

That very last paragraph ― written by Margaret Mac Millan ― is marvellously said. The frontier between history and legend is sometimes difficult to define. I’ll be ordering that book very soon. I am actually reading a book about “Hirohito & the making of Modern Japan”, by Herbert P. Bix. There is still much to understand about that part of the planet. So many questions still unanswered.

Best regards,

Leopold

 

From: rod miller

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2009 12:45 PM

Subject: Re: Situation reports Chinese camps

 

Dear Leopold

If your interested you can listen to Margaret MacMillan on the links below.

http://www.abc.net.au/rn/latenightlive/stories/2008/2298060.htm

http://www.lowyinstitute.org/Publication.asp?pid=850

If you wish to see her give her speech you can watch it here. This will require a fast broadband Internet service.
She mentions
China at about 13 minutes into her speech.

http://www.themonthly.com.au/tm/node/1283 Part 1

http://www.themonthly.com.au/tm/node/1281 Part 2

Rod

 

From: <gregleck@epix.net>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 4:48 AM

Subject: Duck Mission personnel and equipment

 

>I recently came across some information about the Duck Mission.  I know
> the only member whose fate is unknown was Eddie Wang, the Chinese
> interpreter.  A list gives his Chinese name as Cheng Han Wang.
>
> According to a list of equipment I found in the National archives, the
> team carried 38 and 45 caliber pistols, as well as carbines with folding
> stocks. 
No mention of Tommy or submachine guns.
>

 

From: Pamela Masters

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 8:19 PM

Subject: Re: Weihsien & Unit-731

 

Just a thought -- As Unit 731 was unknown to any of us internees till after the war was over, I can't see how we could have been spreading rumors about it in the camp.

Pamela Masters-Flynn

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, February 09, 2009 8:54 PM

Subject: William Smith -- Thought you might like this...

 

Kim Smith has sent me  this fascinating biographical sketch of her father Willam Smith,  an OSS artist who came to Weihsien after  our liberation in August 1945 when he  sketched and photographed Weihsien life.  Kim is currently working on an upcoming display in California of her father's work.

 

Mary Previte


-----Original Message-----
From: kim smith <kim5888@sbcglobal.net>

http://www.tfaoi.com/aa/3aa/3aa117.htm

This short bio was written by a friend of the family who is also a curator. 

Very best,

Kim

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, February 13, 2009 3:51 PM

Subject: English version of Weihsien Camp documentary

 

 

 

Since I'm visiting Hong Kong, I phoned Sui Shude today in Weifang.  Mr. Sui tells me that an English version of the Weihsien Camp documentary is on the drawing board.  They were thrilled at the enormous response they'd  had throughout China for the broadcasting of  5-part series on national TV. 

 

Mr. Sui told me what a good response Weihsien had  during the Olympics, so the People's Government of Weifang is planning what they'll do next to improve the concentration camp site.  He said plans include improving some of the rooms in the hospital to use them for display purposes.  

 

The People's Government of Weifang hopes to create a Weihsien Concentration Camp web site in Chinese and English.

 

Mary Previte

 

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Cc: Janette & Pierre @ home

Sent: Friday, February 13, 2009 6:15 PM

Subject: new photos

 

Dear Kim & Weihsien friends,

Thanks to Kim, we have a brand new set of photos in "avant première" :

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/KimSmith/PhotosSketches/Weihsien_Camp/p_WeihsienCamp.htm

there are a lot more to come but this is the first batch. My final layout is not yet ready but I am sure that you will be all happy to give your comments on these first pictures.

Don't forget to give the number of the picture --- more details about the immediate surroundings --- and the names of the people you think you can recognize!  I'd be happy to add all that on the website.

Best regards,

Leopold

PS    Ted, isn't that you on picture "w009"?

 

From: Kim Smith

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, February 13, 2009 7:19 PM

Subject: Re: new photos

 

Please, let us know which photos you recognize by the code at the bottom!  It's so exciting to find out who they are!

 

From: Albert de Zutter

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, February 13, 2009 10:18 PM

Subject: Re: new photos

 

Kim,

 

In picture 007, the nun at left is probably Sister Hiltrudis of St. Joseph School in Tsingtao. The next person, a man with a mustache is certainly Jimmy Baskett of Tsingtao. The next man, in shorts, could very well be Mr. Cockburn, who was our Scout Master, with Father Hanquet and Father Palmers as assistant Scout Masters. If I could get the entire image of the other photos enlarged it is possible I might recognize some more people. I tried, but i could only get a small portion of each picture in the enlarged size.

 

Albert de Zutter

 

From: grannydavies@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, February 13, 2009 11:31 PM

Subject: Re: new photos

 

Picture 13, that's  Phyllis Evans in the middle bottom row. could be ChristianeChatham above me, am not sure. Phyllis

 

From: Albert de Zutter

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 12:21 PM

Subject: Re: new photos

 

In picture 002, the second person from the left, I believe, is Alice Gerber.

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, February 13, 2009 9:51 AM

Subject: English version of Weihsien Camp documentary

 

 

 

Since I'm visiting Hong Kong, I phoned Sui Shude today in Weifang.  Mr. Sui tells me that an English version of the Weihsien Camp documentary is on the drawing board.  They were thrilled at the enormous response they'd  had throughout China for the broadcasting of  5-part series on national TV. 

 

Mr. Sui told me what a good response Weihsien had  during the Olympics, so the People's Government of Weifang is planning what they'll do next to improve the concentration camp site.  He said plans include improving some of the rooms in the hospital to use them for display purposes.  

 

The People's Government of Weifang hopes to create a Weihsien Concentration Camp web site in Chinese and English.

 

Mary Previte

 

From: Dusty Knisely

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2009 2:58 AM

Subject: Re: English version of Weihsien Camp documentary

 

Wow, Mary, you are helping also to advertise us.  Can't wait for the English version.  The Chinese one was wonderful!  Sui Shude has much to be proud of.

What memories it brings back from recent years also!!!  Georgie Reinbrecht Knisely

 

From: David Birch

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2009 7:54 PM

Subject: Re: English version of Weihsien Camp documentary

 

Looking back to the period 1943 - 1945, Weihsien Camp, interestingly, brings back a flood of nostalgic memories to me. I was eleven when I came to Weihsien with the contingent from Chefoo, and thirteen when I left a few weeks after being set free by the American airmen.

Mr Sui has done so much for us in helping to preserve that (to us) most important part of history!

And so have you, Mary! I don't clearly recall you Dusty. But I'm sure our paths crossed many times in days of old.

David

 

 

From: "Terri Stewart" <tksweaver@verizon.net>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Friday, March 06, 2009 2:01 AM

Subject: Re: English version of Weihsien Camp documentary

 

Ø      This is exciting news! I watched most of the 5-part series but would have loved to have listened to it in English. When that version becomes available I can forward it to my family that has been following some of this history.
>
> Terri Stewart

 

From: Estelle Horne nee Cliff

To: weihsien@topica.com

Cc: expeditions@biosearch.org.uk

Sent: Monday, March 09, 2009 6:47 PM

Subject: GCS Russell

 

From Estelle Horne nee Cliff

 

I received this email from Peter Overton, grandson of Gardiner Russell who was in Weihsien, and in fact died there. He was a trader in Tsingtao, under the trade name of GCS Russell. They were interned in 1942 in the ILTIS HYDRO Hotel, and then were the first group to be transferred to Weihsien.

 

Does anyone remember him?? Norman's widow Joyce put him in touch with me.

 

Estelle

 

From: Biosearch Expeditions

Date: 26/02/2009 17:59:25

To: jeromeandestellehorne@yahoo.co.uk

Subject: Weihsein GCF Russell

 

 

 

Dear Estelle,

 

Thank you very much for your help.

 

I am gradually piecing together my grandfather’s life and you have provided another snippet by telling me that he was one of the first to enter the camp – presumably shortly after the Pearl Harbour attack. I would really like to try to find someone who knew him. This is becoming increasingly difficult since he died aged 65 in the camp in 1944 and those still alive would be a different generation. Nevertheless if you have any ideas I would welcome them.

My mother was born in China. Her parents separated when she was 11 and she never saw her mother or two siblings again. She subsequently had sporadic contact with her father, who was probably in China most of his adult life. She was raised in England by GCF Russell’s sister. My mother’s first husband died very soon after they married in 1938 and she married my father, Nevil Overton, a Battle of Britain pilot, at the end of the war.

In a way my researches are trying to put together a broken family. Since I know practically nothing about Gardiner Russell, a living contact would be fantastic. I suppose anyone who knew him on a personal level would probably be at least 90 by now, since they would probably have to be in their 20s in the camp to have really engaged with him.

Thank you again for your prompt reply.

 

Peter Overton

Hilltop Farm

Welbourn

Lincolnshire Tel: 01400 273323

 

From: Albert de Zutter

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, March 09, 2009 8:42 PM

Subject: Re: GCS Russell

 

I can't say I remember Mr. Russell, as I was 10 years old when the Tsingtao people were interned. However, I can add a few crumbs of general information to what Mr. Overton knows.

 

After Pearl Harbor, "enemy aliens" (American, British, Belgian, Dutch) were placed under house arrest. Soon we were allowed out from noon to 3 p.m. to take care of necessary business. Then we were interned in the Iltis Hydro on October 20, 1942, and transferred to Weihsien in March 1943. As he already knows, the Tsingtao group was the first to be brought to Weihsien.

 

I wish him luck in finding someone more contemporary with his grandfather.

 

Albert de Zutter

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com ; roycampbell@eastlink.ca ; patrickgoodland@freenet.co.uk ; lauchlan@fctvplus.net ; sametcalf@hotmail.com ; douglasrosie@ntlworld.com ; neil.yorkston@gmail.com ; henrylack@homechoice.co.uk ; jeromeandestellehorne@yahoo.co.uk ; jht3@msi-professional.org

Sent: Friday, March 13, 2009 10:58 PM

Subject: WEIHSIEN CAMP documentary

 

Meggie Li, producer of the WEIHSIEN CAMP  documentary, and Director of the Shandong Provincial Broadcasting and TV Bureau tells me that they are now producing a 100-minute English version with hopes that it may be aired outside of China.

 

If any of you has helpful connections to  television media outlets in USA  (such as the History Channel)  or in the United Kingdom or Australia , please let me know.  Let's  help with this project.

 

Mr. Sui Shude tells me that Weifang paid 800,000 renminbi  ($100,000 in USA dollars, I believe)  to produce and broadcast this documetary throughout China.

 

Mary Previte

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2009 3:37 PM

Subject: Re: WEIHSIEN CAMP documentary

 

 

Yesterday I received an e-mail from Meggie Li,  who produced the  5-part WEIHSIEN CAMP documentary that was broadcast to every part of China last October.  After more than 60 years,  our Weihsien experience continues to broadcast  what some might consider a surprising  message from an internment camp.

 

Because Meggie interviewed  a good number of you for this  series,  I wanted to drop you this note. If you thought you were just telling a story, read  part of Meggie's first paragraph as she comments on creating this documentary:

 

"It is my pleasure to meet all of you who were internees in Weihsien Camp,"  Meggie writes.  "You have given us good lessons about love, forgiveness, tolerance."

 

Mary Taylor Previte

 

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, March 21, 2009 10:43 AM

Subject: screen captures

 

Hello all,

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/CCTV/ScreenCaptures/p_ScreenCaptures_01.htm

--- a new link,

I also received the De-Luxe box with the DVDs of the TV documentary about Weihsien. Magnificent work. I also have a extra copy for my sister Janette and a copy for Father Hanquet's family. Unfortunately I don't understand Chinese but the story is very comprehensible and the interviews are in English. I'm just as impatient as you all are, to be able to vision the 100 minute English version when it will be ready.

On the Weihsien-Paintings' website, I added a new page with screen captures. I know many of you by name but not visually. Could you help me complete the names of those who were interviewed?

I guess that "066" is Pamela Masters, --- "053" is Estelle Cliff --- "032" is Peter Bazire --- "085" is Stephen Metcalf ---

If you click on the number just under the image you will get a postit with the caption. If you click on the image --- it will ZOOM in another window. ---- and so on ---

There are also a lot of family photos from your personal albums --- it could be interesting to know more about those pictures --- when? where? who? ---

Could you help me with the captions?

Thanks again ---

Best regards,

Leopold

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, March 23, 2009 3:09 AM

Subject: James Hudson Taylor III

 

Overseas Missionary Fellowship announces the death of James Hudson Taylor III

James Hudson Taylor lll, great-grandson of the founder of the China Inland Mission, died early this morning the 20th of March 2009, in Hong Kong. Having been born and raised in China, he imbibed its language, thought forms and literature like the Chinese themselves, and won the respect of senior Chinese government officials and of church leaders alike.

James Hudson Taylor lll was born on 12 August 1929 in China’s ancient city of Kaifeng, situated in Henan province on the south bank of the Yellow River. His parents served here as missionaries of the Free Methodist Church.

As a 12-year-old boy, he was interned in Weihsien Concentration Camp for three years, when the whole of Chefoo School was moved there during the Sino-Japanese War. Eric Liddell, the Olympian who won gold in the 1924 Paris Olympics, was also in this camp and taught the boys games.

Camp life was a tough and cramped existence. Summers were often blisteringly hot, and the children had to contend with swarms of flies and rats. Jim Taylor, interned with his brother and two sisters, also had the company of his grandfather in the camp. He was always to remember his grandfather’s sure faith during this testing time. He wrote ‘I saw in Grandpa how the patterns of life had been set.   Every day began with praise.’ The camp was liberated on 17 August 1945, and the Taylor family reunited the following month.

James Taylor returned to the US for college education at Spring Arbor College, Michigan; Greenville College, Illinois; and Asbury Theological Seminary. He would later pursue further study at Yale University and Yale University Divinity School. In 1951 he married Leone Tjepkema, a fellow student at Spring Arbor and Greenville Colleges. Their marriage was to prove a strong partnership for service in each sphere ahead of them.

In June 1955 James and Leone arrived in Taiwan to begin missionary service in Kaohsiung. They joined James’ parents just as Holy Light Bible School, founded by his father, began its first year of classes. James and Leone’s three children (Amelia [1955], Signe [1957], and Jamie [1959]) were born during their first term. When James’s parents returned to America for home assignment in 1960, James was invited to serve as the principal, an office he held for ten years.

In 1970 he was appointed founding president of China Evangelical Seminary (CES) in Taipei. CES was an expression of the Chinese church’s desire to provide theological education for university graduates. In this role he travelled extensively among Chinese churches worldwide to impart the vision.

In 1979 James Taylor received an unexpected invitation to become the seventh General Director of what was by then the Overseas Missionary Fellowship, succeeding Michael Griffiths. He took up this position on 1 July 1980, the first descendant of the mission’s founder to serve in this role. The 1980s brought consolidation and growth across all OMF fields, and strikingly so in Japan, The Philippines and Hong Kong’s new towns; in literature ministry; and among factory workers in Taiwan. China was welcoming professionals to contribute to its policy of ‘Four Modernisations’. Under James Taylor’s leadership, OMF was encouraged to continue in their concerns for China & the Chinese people. China Awareness seminars became established across the UK and North America, and new energy went into the creation and distribution of apologetic literature in Chinese.

When James Taylor handed the leadership to David Pickard in 1991, he & Leone relocated to Hong Kong to seek opportunities to serve the Chinese people. In 1993, with a Chinese American Professor of Paediatrics and a businessman from Hong Kong, James Taylor formed Medical Services International (MSI), to serve in Sichuan province where Jim Broomhall, a descendant of Benjamin and Amelia (Hudson Taylor’s younger sister) Broomhall had served as a medical doctor among the Yi people in the early 1950s.

MSI was soon to diversify into Accounting, English teaching, community development, livestock rearing, and Business/ Management. Invitations, extended in full partnership with the provincial government, were extended to skilled teams bringing long-term commitment to serve in needed spheres.

In 1993 the marriage of James and Leone Taylor’s son, Jamie, to Ke Yeh Min from Taiwan, brought Chinese blood into the family line. James Taylor took especial delight in teaching Bible stories and New Testament Greek to James Hudson Taylor V (known as JT) and his sisters Selina and Joy, when the whole family lived in Hong Kong. He had a strong sense of legacy; the legacy he had received in the seventh generation of his family’s Christian history, and the legacy he himself would pass on.

Dr James Taylor received honorary doctorates from Greenville College (1978) and Asbury Theological Seminary (1987); more recently he was also awarded two honorary doctorates, in recognition of his distinguished service in Christian mission, by Tyndale College and Seminary, Toronto (2001) and Spring Arbor University (2009).

His ten years of service as founding president of MSI gave him opportunity to work with officials from the central government as well as with provincial and grassroots leaders. The depth of their acceptance and respect is reflected in their referring to him as 'Overseas Chinese'. On 4 April 2007, in a ceremony attended by 300 people, a county of the Sichuan province conferred on him honorary citizenship.

Dr Taylor’s book on the life of Hudson Taylor’s father-in-law Even to Death: The Life and Legacy of Samuel Dyer, co-authored with Irene Chang, will be published this year.

Two Festschrifts, each planned to celebrate James Taylor’s 80th birthday, will be released shortly. They honour a man who pressed into service an unusual combination of ten talents and high energy, all infused with a love of Christ and a humble spirit.

OMF International

God’s Grace to Nine Generations (OMF Singapore 1999) p18
Published by OMF HK, ISBN: 978-962-8402-13-7

From: gkapo@sbcglobal.net

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, March 23, 2009 3:57 AM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 

Dear Mary

My condolence on the death of you brother.

George Watts- Weihsien

 

From: Dwight W. Whipple

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, March 23, 2009 4:27 AM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 

We also send our condolences, Mary.  In reading the notice of your brother's death including some of his life story we are reminded of so many familiar names and places.  Our father and mother, Elden & Evelyn Whipple, as well as our future step-mother, Marian Carleson Whipple all went to China in 1931 under CIM.  We were in Tsingtao when the war started and we were under house arrest first, then interned at Iltis Hydro, then transferred to Weihsien on March 20, 1943 and repatriated to the US in September of that year, arriving in New York on December 1st.  We share your sorrow at the loss of your brother but rejoice in the life that he lived and the contribution he made through his life to China.

~Dwight W. Whipple

 

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, March 23, 2009 8:11 AM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 

Dear Mary,

--- from Belgium, our condolences on the death of your brother ---

One of his last pictures dated February 14th of this year :

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/JamesTaylor/indexFrame.htm

Nicky, Leopold and Janette Pander

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, March 23, 2009 1:26 PM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 

Thank you so very much, Dwight.

 

I  said my goodbyes to my precious brother in a wonderful week with him last month in Hong Kong and will fly out next week for the memorial service.

 

Mary Taylor Previte

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, March 23, 2009 1:26 PM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 

Thank you so very much, George.

 

I  said my goodbyes to my precious brother in a wonderful week with him last month in Hong Kong and will fly out next week for the memorial service.

 

Mary Taylor Previte

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, March 23, 2009 1:31 PM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 

You are such a comfort,  Leopold.  Thank you so very much.  I took that picture on my goodbye visit to my precious brother last month in Hong Kong. . 

 

I  will fly out next week for the memorial service.

 

I am still working on getting a disk  for you that includes my brother's Weihsien bird watching diary that includes color sketches.  The folks who copied it  didn't know how tro scan to me so big and amount of material.

 

Mary Taylor Previte

 

From: Kim Smith

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, March 23, 2009 3:05 PM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 

I am SO sorry Mary for the loss of your brother. 

Very many good thoughts to you, and a remote hug if you would like one.

Kim Smith

 

From: Mitch Krayton

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, March 23, 2009 6:40 PM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 

It with deep regret to learn of your loss. Your brother's life was full of giving and caring. You and your family should take great pride in his legacy work and the impact he made with the Chinese people.

I was not in Weihsien, I am just doing research on a biography for one of you who was. I am a fascinated observer on this list by the depth of love you all share for each other after such a traumatic period together in the camp. And that you understand how important it is to preserve your history.

You and your brother, Mary, give the rest of us hope in these trying times we now live in.

Mitch Krayton

 

From: grannydavies@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 1:00 AM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 




thank you for the news of James Hudson Taylor III    Phyllis

 

From: liuyanyan

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 4:40 AM

Subject: links of the documentary

 

Dear everybody:
This is wang guiying ,vice mayor of weifang people's government,and also former director of foreign affairs office.I put the links of the documentary below so everybody interested can see it.
I am so moved by all of you and thank you sincerely.
guiying  wang
 
part 1
http://news.xinhuanet.com/video/2008-10/15/content_10198552.htm
part 2
http://news.xinhuanet.com/video/2008-10/15/content_10197312.htm
part 3
http://news.xinhuanet.com/video/2008-10/15/content_10197245.htm
part 4
http://news.xinhuanet.com/video/2008-10/16/content_10204583.htm
part 5
http://news.xinhuanet.com/video/2008-10/17/content_10209086.htm


微软地图实时路况,为您节省的不仅仅是时间! 立即查看!

 

From: Gay Talbot Stratford

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 5:29 PM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 

Mary,

You must be so proud of your brother and his life well lived. I pray for you all and with you, give thanks for a beacon of faith.

Gay Talbot Stratford 

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 1:51 AM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 

What a beautiful message, Mitch!  Thank you so very much.

 

Yes,  Weihsien connected us in ways that changed our lives forever.  I, for one, am grateful for everyone's help in preserving this history.   I wish you might have experienced the  memorable,  60-anniversary reunion that celebrated our liberation.  Officials in Weifang  have earned our everlasting gratitude for preserving this chapter of their history.

 

Mary Taylor Previte

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2009 12:30 PM

Subject: Fwd: Weihsien

 

 

 


From: hampton.oxford@dial.pipex.com
To:
lauchlan@fullchannel.net, e.v.goldsmith@ntlworld.com, JohnHoyte@aol.com, jeromeandestellehorne@yahoo.co.uk, kathywfoster@talktalk.net, philip.holder@ntlworld.com, MTPrevite@aol.com, rwbridge@freeuk.com
Sent: 4/9/2009 6:26:52 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time
Subj:
Weihsien

 

Dear Weihsien Brownies and Guides

 

Marian Lauchlan has lent me her Kingfisher Log Book from the 1st Chefoo Guides. They  were asked a list of questions during their 4th meeting in 1943.

I wonder if any of you can answer some of these questions now? Just a few answers would help me with my book about Brownies and Guides during the second world war.

If you know any other Weihsien children who might know the answers, do pass this on.

 

Many thanks, Janie Hampton

Oxford

 

hampton.oxford@dial.pipex.com

www.janiehampton.co.uk
www.chauncymaples.org

 

"How much do you know about Weihsien?" compiled by 'Lefty' ( Miss ? Priestman)

 

1.  How many water towers are there in this compound?

2.  What is Mrs. George Washington's real name and her community job?

3.  How many loaves are baked in the bakery every day, on average?

4.  What is the number of the block named Downing Street?

5.  At what time on the clock face was the moon at seven o'clock this morning?

6.  What is the height of the sprays in the showers from the ground?

7.  What is the name of the lady in charge of female labour at Kitchen one?

8.  How many books are there in the library?

9.  In which direction does the weathervane on top of 23 point?

10. How many families live in houses on the compound?

11. What is the width of the South playground?

12. What rank comes next above Captain in the Salvation Army? 

13. Which girl in the Guides is the lightest in weight?

14. How many circular plain glass windows are there in the church?

15. How far is it from the steps of 23 to the Gateway opposite?

16. How many people are fed at Kitchen one?

17. What would six medium-sized apples weigh?

18. How far is it from the wall of the ladies’ showers to the wall of the baggage room?

19.   Who lives at number 2 Harley St?

20.   What is the height from the ground to the top of the archways in the porch of 24?


ends/

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2009 7:02 PM

Subject: Weihsien Brownies and Girl Guides -- book in progress

 

 

 


From: hampton.oxford@dial.pipex.com
To:
MTPrevite@aol.com
Sent: 4/9/2009 8:44:47 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time
Subj:
Re: Weihsien

 

Dear Mary

 

Many thanks for passing this on. It will be interesting to see how much people can remember after 65 years!

 

My book is coming along nicely. I have some great stories from Guides in Jersey, who went underground during the German occupation. And Guides in Poland who helped in the resistance. I met a wonderful Jewish Dutch Guide who had escaped  in 1940 with her parents in a rowing boat across the English Channel, and through Guides became integrated in England. The story was published in 1946, and when I told my husband, he recognised her name as a well -known London psychotherapist. I tracked her down, and we had an extra-ordinary morning - she lay on her couch and told me her story, I sat in her therapist's chair, and we both wept!

 

I feel that writing this book is such a privilege, allowing me to find so many wonderful people. A log book in the Imperial War Museum led me to a house in Scotland, where three Brown Owls looked after 50 Glaswegian evacuees. Turns out that, by complete coincidence,  the house is now owned by Baden-Powell's grand-daughter in law! Her daughter is the last in the B-P line. They have invited me up in May to look at family albums.

 

Have avery happy Easter, Janie


Janie Hampton

 

www.janiehampton.co.uk
www.chauncymaples.org

----- Original Message -----

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: hampton.oxford@dial.pipex.com

Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2009 12:33 PM

Subject: Re: Weihsien

 

Janie,

 

I've forwarded your request to the entire Weihsien Topica network.  I'm sure you'll get som answers.

 

How is your book coming?

 

Mary Taylor Previte

 

From: Pamela Masters

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2009 7:07 PM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 

Dear Mary -- I've been in and out of the hospital for since 3/20 and have only now opened up my e-mail. I am so sorry to hear about your brother. What a wonderful life he led. For all of us who truly believe, it is never good-bye just aur revoire, but it is still so very hard to say. My sympathy goes out to you and your nearest and dearest -- Love Pamela (Masters Flynn)

 

From: "Jonathan Henshaw" <jonathan.henshaw@ualberta.ca>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2009 5:32 AM

Subject: writing project

 

Hi everyone,

My name is Jonathan Henshaw and I am a graduate student at the 
University of Alberta. I have contacted some of you previously as part 
of a research project that I am doing on Weihsien. Just after my 
undergrad, I lived in Yantai for six months, very close to the old 
Chefoo School, and then, on a subsequent trip to HK, met and spoke 
with a former internee there-and it was at that point that I became 
more interested in the camp.

I've spent some time looking at the Weihsien paintings website, and 
wanted to ask all the folks on topica if they knew of other written 
accounts of the camp that had yet to be published or find their way 
online. In particular, I am interested in the following:

*the report written by Dr Augusta Wagner comparing Weihsien with a 
camp for interned Japanese in the
US. I have found part of this report 
online, and contacted the website owner, but he no longer had a 
complete copy either;

*anything written that states that Mr McLaren did indeed testify on 
behalf of the commandant at the Tokyo War trials. I've looked in 
Norman Cliff's two books, "Prisoners of the Samurai," and "Courtyard 
of the
Happy Way," but cannot find that mentioned in either of them;

*something more specific about those that became snitches for, or 
collaborated with, the Japanese guards. Some of the published memoirs 
vaguely mention these folks, but I wonder if there are other written 
sources out there;

*and finally, any written work that paints a clearer image of the 
Japanese guards and commandant-they appear so seldom in so many of the 
works that I can't help but be curious.

This message has become rather long, but I would certainly appreciate 
it if anyone could point me in the right direction, or put me in touch 
with someone who might know more on the above. Also, if you have any 
questions or comments about my project, please don't hesitate to write.

Thanks in advance for your attention on this, and for having taken the 
time to share your stories. And happy easter!

Sincerely,
Jonathan Henshaw

PS: if possible, I would certainly appreciate being added to the list.

 

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2009 10:59 AM

Subject: Re: writing project

 

Dear Jonathan,

"*anything written that states that Mr McLaren did indeed testify on 
behalf of the commandant at the Tokyo War trials. I've looked in 
Norman Cliff's two books, "Prisoners of the Samurai," and "Courtyard 
of the
Happy Way," but cannot find that mentioned in either of them;"

In Norman's chapter see also: http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/NormanCliff/people/Committee/McLaren/txt_McLAREN.htm


Happy Easter ,

Leopold

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2009 12:28 PM

Subject: Re: James Hudson Taylor III

 

Pamela:

 

Thank you so very much.

I do hope you are mending

 

Have you received a deluxe copy of the Weihshien Camp DVD?  I know that the producer,  Meggie Li, mailed copies to those in Europe whom she interviewed.  If you have not received a copy, please send me your mailing address so I can forward a copy of the deluxe set to you.  It is a gift from my brother, James, who asked the JINAN  production team to make this deluxe set.

 

Happy Easter,

 

Mary

 

From: berean@xplornet.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 6:09 PM

Subject: Meeting with Tad Nagaki

 

I thought you might enjoy reading about my visit with Tad Nagaki.

 

Audrey Nordmo Horton

 

 

 From Audrey Nordmo Horton January 30 was a momentous day for my husband and me. . We met Tad Nagaki in person and we both thanked him for rescuing me on August 17th, 1945. He had kindly arranged for us to meet him at Alliance Tractor in Alliance, Nebraska. We called him on our cell phone an hour before our arrival to make sure that all was on schedule. We took him to eat at the Chinese restaurant he selected. The quieter area of the restaurant was taken so where we ate we had difficulty hearing each other. After our meal we returned to the Alliance Tractor business where we had a table and chairs to ourselves in a quiet area, what a treasured time. He is very alert and his memory is fantastic. I asked him if I could give him a hug in appreciation for delivering me. He said, ―Yes as that is the only way he gets hugs. He was smiling broadly. He is lonely and seems to dread going home where he is reminded of his wife who died 10 years ago. His three children died years ago and his only 3 grandchildren live in Colorado. I had photo copied a page from my old autograph book which had Tad’s autograph in it. I had him sign a current autograph on that page. I also gave him photocopies of the pages I had the six autographs of our heroes on. I showed him the photocopy of the letter with the Duck Team’s names on the bottom in which they were thanking the camp for our cooperation... He quickly pointed out that the name of Willis S Georgia – Captain – US Army didn’t belong there, as he was not part of the Duck Team. I think the Alliance Tractor business is his favourite place to be at while away from his house. The people there were very kind. The secretary was most helpful. I had corresponded with her by e-mail and she in turn contacted Tad for me as I had had problems understanding Tad on the phone due to my hearing problem and depending on the connection we were having on the cell phone. Sadly, due to our travelling and not being on internet regularly—I read her letter too late telling of a change in her schedule for January 30th saying she wouldn’t be there in the office after 11 a.m. and we got there at 11:30—whereas we could have arrived earlier. They remembered the article Mary Previte had written about Tad Nagaki Tad was walking without the aid of a cane and didn’t complain of any pain. We hated to leave him but we had to be on our way. We were driving from our home in British Columbia, Canada to South Carolina. We were very glad we went out of our way to meet Tad who is such a gentle man. I would certainly recommend a visit with him if you have the opportunity. He appreciates phone calls. His cell phone # is 308-760-2899. It is easier to reach him this way and also better for him. When he is home he doesn’t have to get up out of his chair to answer the phone. As we were leaving, Tad said he would have to call Mary Taylor Previte to tell her about the visit. I truly believe it was a bright spot in his day. It certainly was a bright spot in our day. All thanks to Mary Previte for opening up the way for us to correspond with our heroes—which I have done—and now to actually meet our last living hero, what precious memories. I had called James Hannon not long before he died but he didn’t connect with me about Weihsien. Instead he would switch to his experience as a German prisoner of war. I do have pictures of our meeting with Tad. Audrey Nordmo Horton

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2009 3:03 PM

Subject: : Meeting with Tad Nagaki

 

Audrey:

 

Please forward your photos to Leopold Pander, tapol@skynet.be , so he can put them on his Weihsien web site,.  We all want to see them.   Tad  Nagaki , age 89,  is the last living American on the DUCK Mission that liberated Weihsien.

 

Mary Previte

 

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, April 17, 2009 9:01 AM

Subject: Tad Nagaki,

 

Dear Audrey,

Hello :-))

Go To: http://www.weihsien-paintings.org  and click on: "the Magnificient Seven"

There is already a link for Tad Nagaki in 2007. I added a New link for 2009.

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/The7Magnificent/Tad_2009/leftFrame.htm

The text and the pictures you sent to me are now visible ---

Could you send me captions for the pictures. Of course, any new documents are always welcome.

Best regards,

Leopold

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2009 3:27 AM

Subject: Another Eric Liddell movie?

 

The Eric Liddell story is seriously on the radar screen of Walden Media of Boston and its founder, conservative billionaire, Philip Anschutz.  I  found more out about this today when movie and television producer Ken Wales and actor Rich Swingle spent most of the day with me.

Walden Media is the team that, with Walt Disney Pictures,   co-produced "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe," a $200 million dollar film adapted from C. S. Lewis's children's book of the same title.   In 2007, Walden Media  also produced "Amazing Grace," the award-winning  film about how English statesman and reformer, William Wilberforce,  stopped the slave trade in England.  I loved that film.  Ken Wales, producer of "Amazing Grace, " and the popular CBS television series, "Christy,"  is now actively working on the Eric Liddell story.  Writing the screen play is Rich Swingle, the actor who created and played the part of Eric Liddell in the one-man show  that has appeared off Broadway in New York and that played in several venues  in Hong Kong during the Olympics last year. Having also  helped create an Eric Liddell film, produced by a Chinese Christian group in Hong Kong,  Swingle has been immersed in the Eric Liddell story for several years. .

Wales and/or Swingle have interviewed many of us Weihsien-ers either in person or by telephone.  They are digging deep.  Little details tell big stories.  When they told me today the role that Douglas Finlay had played in Eric Liddell's  final hours,  I knew how very deeply they have been digging.  Douglas Finlay -- 6' 6 1/2" --  was one of Weihsien's super star athletes.  Douglas and my sister Kathleen Taylor  were madly in love as the war ended.   Sad, sad, sad!  After our Taylor family was evacuated from Weihsien,  Douglas and Kathleen never saw each other again.   Douglas reconnected with me --  thanks to Desmond Power (Little Foreign Devil)  and this Weihsien Topica network.  Eric Liddell and Douglas had  been friends, running competitors, and house mates in Weihsien, first in the hospital and then -- after Hummell and Tipton escaped -- in Block 23.   In telephone conversations, Douglas told me about  how he and  Kathleen met. He told me about his being with Eric Liddell in the hospital on that final day.  Alas, Douglas died in 2000.  So I was dumbfounded today when Ken Wales started talking about Douglas Finlay.  Dumbfounded is too weak a word.   Ken Wales told me today that Desmond and I are the only ones they've talked to that knew Douglas Finlay and the Douglas Finlay-Eric Liddell connection.   Yes, this team is taking the project very, very seriously. 

Who would play the part of Eric Liddell?  Ken Wales, who is the Executive Producer, is thinking of Ioan Gruffudd who played the part of William Wilberforce in "Amazing Grace."   And where is the film likely to be shot?  Australia is a possibility.

Walden Media is owned by Philip Anschutz, an oil magnate, media mogul, the owner of the Regal Entertainment Group  -- the largest motion picture exhibitor in the world (it operates nearly 20 percent of all indoor screens in the US) -- and a growing force in Hollywood.

Anschutz has already made his mark in Hollywood.  A major contributor to conservative causes, Anschutz decided not long ago to begin a career as a twenty-first-century Louis B. Mayer. His agenda: producing humanistic, family-oriented films. "We expect them to be entertaining, but also to be life affirming and to carry a moral message," he says. . He sees movie making  as a "chance  to attempt some small improvement in the culture." 

To improve the culture, I can't think of a better story than Eric Liddell's.

By the way,  Anschutz has been ranked number 33 on Business Week's 50 Most Generous Philanthropists List.

Mary Previte

From: "Terri Stewart" <tksweaver@verizon.net>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Monday, April 20, 2009 1:50 AM

Subject: Re: Another Eric Liddell movie?

 


This is really a cool follow up to Eric's story as well as those who knew him, in and out of camp. For those on this list who may not know the actor
Ioan Gruffudd, he played Captain Fantastic from the recent Fantastic Four movies. You know, the super hero who could stretch like rubber.

Terri Stewart

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2009 4:06 PM

Subject: radios in Weihsien

 

How many radios did internees have in Weihsien?  I know the Japanese suspected that  internees had at least one radio and searched for them.

 

Top-secret information like this, of course,  was hidden from almost everybody and certainly youngsters like us -- and from snitches in the camp.  I remember that wartime news filtered down to us Chefoo School students in the form of infrequent  briefings that provided information that must have come first either  from a radio or from news smuggled in  by escapees, Hummel and Tipton,  via the Chinese "honey pot" men.

 

Long after the war, Jackie Graham,  a Chefoo School classmate,  told me  of his being assigned to sneak into a building in the Japanese quarters to steal a radio tube from a radio there.   Someone must have done some serious spy work to know where that radio was in off-limits Japanese quarters.  To avoid suspicion,  I believe Jackie swapped the good radio tube  with a dud and even made sure  the replacement looked dusty.   I believe Jackie was assigned to this skullduggery by someone on the  Weihsien internee ruling council.  Jackie was a spunky youngster ideal for a project like this.

 

If someone needed a radio tube, it must have been for a radio that internees had..

 

Mary Previte

 

From: Pamela Masters

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 7:38 PM

Subject: Re: radios in Weihsien

 

The only person I knew who had access to a radio was Bobby Grandon, famous for ringing the bell in the bell tower building (#23) on VE Day. If you recall, he rang the bell around eleven pm at night and guards rushed through the compounds and we were all hauled out for a freezing roll call. As I couldn't locate Bobby to get his approval to use his name in the incident in my book, The Mushroom Years (see pages 244 - 248), I had to give him a fictitious one.

 

 

PAMELA MASTERS, Author/Publisher
"You don't read her books...you LIVE them!"
Henderson House Publishing
Ph: 530-647-2000
Fx:  530-647-2002
www.hendersonhouse.com

 

From: Dwight W. Whipple

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 9:04 PM

Subject: Re: radios in Weihsien

 

I seem to remember that Didi Sayles (sp?) had a radio or had access to one.  I remember his name because I am called Didi (little brother in Chinese) by my family.

~Dwight Whipple

 

From: Bob Bradbury

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 9:55 AM

Subject: Re: radios in Weihsien

 

I did not know whilst I was in the camp about any radios. I only knew the honey pot men dropped messages in silk or paper usually hidden in their nostrils but their information mainly related to the advances made by the communist fighters. That was enough to frighten everybody.  I do not remember who rang the bell late at night but it signalled us to go quickly to the ballfield to be counted. Winter and summer in sometimes atrocious weather.

A few years ago Bob and I visited Armic Baliantz' wife Armen, known as Tsolik in her Bali restaurant in San Francisco. I think Armic was still alive and in a terrible state from the treatment and beatings he had received from the Japs both at the Iltris Hydro and in WeiHsien.

As a matter of fact she gave me a letter in her handwriting detailing a vicious beating they inflicted on him in the presence of Tsolik WHILST SHE WAS ACTUALLY GIVING BIRTH in the camp hospital  demanding to know whether he was going to name the baby Douglas (or Arthur) after the Supreme Allied Commander, General Douglas MacArthur. Despite his beating Tsolik answered,-"I cant tell you because the baby is only half born and I do not know whether it is going to be a boy or girl"

At the time of our visit to Tsolik she told me that her husband Armic had  secreted a radio receiver under the altar in the Church in the camp and that he used to listen to it during the Sunday services.

 I have always wondered why, if there were radios in the camp we did not know of the atomic bombs and impending capitulation. Maybe it is true the committee knew but did not allow it to be spread amongst the internees. I certainly wasnt told maybe because I was only 17 2/12 years old at capitulation.Joyce Bradbury

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 1:48 PM

Subject: Re: radios in Weihsien

 

 

Amazing how grown ups shielded us  younger internees  from some of the horrors of the horrors of the camp.

 

Mary Previte

 

From: Estelle Horne nee Cliff

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 3:58 PM

Subject: Re: radios in Weihsien

 

I remember a story that my aunt, Marjory Broomhall, headmistress of CIMGS, told me years later. She said the Japanese (a Jap officer?) came to an internee who was known to be good radio technician, and asked him to repair his radio. The man found the fault easily and fixed it. But he said to the owner that he needed a certain part, with a long name, and drew the supposed part on a piece of paper. The Jap spent the rest of the war hunting for the spare part, while the internee enjoyed the use of the radio. I know no names.

 

Has it occurred to you how ironic the situation, that the people who became calculator suppliers to the world, took an hour to reconcile their figures at each rollcall?

 

I was in the matric class - little me and seven or eight boys. Our classroom was in the hospital attic, where the boys' dorm was. The teacher put a map on the flipchart, hand drawn I guess, showing us the pincer movement of the Allies on Berlin - the Russians from the north and the US and Britain from the West. Suddenly there was a clomp of heavy boots on the wooden stairs, and the flipchart quickly changed. By the time the Jap officer entered the room we were studying mathamatics.

 

And suddenly it was all over. Pa Bruce came to talk to us, recommending that we do our exams straight away. Nothing would be lost if we failed, but if we passed we would not have to go back to school for two more years 'at home'. (They had saved the half-year Oxford papers since the war started, in case they were sunk on the way out.) We agreed. He gave us a week to swot, and then we wrote - in the sweltering August heat, with the scissor-grinders buzzing in the trees, and the food parcels falling from the rumbling skies outside the window!

 

We got our results the following April. Pa had taken the two sets of papers written in camp, to Oxford himself. Chefoo's reputation saved the day. Most of us passed, in spite of all the upheavals along the way.

 

I've met one or two white-haired men who were part of the Class of '45. I'd like to hear from them! Where are you guys??

 

Estelle Cliff Horne

 

From: Jonathan Henshaw

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2009 3:56 AM

Subject: Commandants

 

Dear Mr Pander,

Thank you for the suggestions on where to look at the Weihsien-paintings website. The information on Goyas was really helpful. If it isn't too much trouble, I have a few other questions.

1) Commandants and Chiefs of Police: different memoirs seem to indicate different people in charge, with a Mr Izu and Mr Koyanagi coming up most frequently...but other people have also mentioned: on page 217 of "A Cross in China: The Story of My Mission," Sister M. Servatia, O.S.F., mentions that on her arrival at Weihsien, the commandant was a man called Mr. Sukigawa, and he had an aide, Mr Ibara. A Red Cross report from Aug. 1944 agrees, mentioning a Mr Tsukikawa as being commandant. Can anyone point me to a source, or recall who was in charge of which aspects of the camp, and at what time?

2) I came across mention of an unpublished memoir called "This is Leo's Life," by Lionel (Leo) Harold Twyford. Is there any chance someone might have a copy of this, or would know where a copy might be found?

Again, thanks all for the suggestions, patience, and advice.

Sincerely,
Jonathan Henshaw

 

From: Estelle Horne nee Cliff

To: weihsien@topica.com

Cc: hampton.oxford@dial.pipex.com

Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2009 9:59 AM

Subject: Re: Weihsien

 

I don't know any of the answers either. They were obviously an exercise to go out and measure.

 

I think Lefty (i.e. lieutenant) was Connie Mann, CIM Hospital Matron, Chefoo. I visited her at a nurses' retirement complex in Surrey some years ago. She was still involved with the Guides. I gave her my old Guide uniform that I had kept, with hand-embroidered badges, and made of the common Chinese blue cotton that became the material for the "Mao suits" (actually started by Sun Yat Sen) that everybody wore in the Mao years.

 

She sent it to the then new HQ in London, and sent me a photo of an exhibition they made of it, and Norman's red Rover scarf with "!st Weihsien" and a temple sewn on it, my song book and I don't know what else.

 

She told me that when we left Chefoo, there were no restrictions on what could be taken for the community, and she packed up the contents of the hospital, every dressing and even empty bottles, which delighted the Weihsien doctors when the boxes arrived.

 

All those photos that were taken of the Weihsien and Chefoo scout troops were, I believe, for Japanese propaganda, but did you notice that none of us had shoes, and we were trying to hide our feet?! 

 

Estelle Cliff Horne

 

From: Bob Bradbury

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2009 10:38 AM

Subject: Re: Commandants

 

Dear Jonathan. I am glad my advice to you to contact WeiHsien Topica seems to be bearing fruit. I particularly remember Mr Koyanagi, Commandant.  I remember he inspected the inmates during a roll call very early in our incarceration. He was wearing full dark coloured Japanese Officer's uniform.   When he saw my father (Edmund Cooke) he said to him, "Cooke! What are you doing here?" and my pop said, "We are your prisoners now"  They then had a conversation about their business associations in Tsingtao before the war and pop told us he had no idea Koyanagi was connected to the Japanese army.  The next day Koyanagi brought water melon and fresh eggs to our rooms for us. Pop told him that because we were prisoners he could not accept the gift and asked him to take them away.  He said it would not look good to the other prisoners. Koyanagi tried to get pop to accept them but he was adamant and he took them with him. I was present when they met and also I noticed other prisoners nearby were astonished my father had had business dealings with our commandant before the war. My father was Manager of Jardine Matheson in Tsingtao before the war.

I knew Leo Twyford Thomas in camp and later in Sydney. I went to his funeral several years ago. Regards. Joyce Bradbury.

 

From: Bruce Henderson

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2009 4:04 PM

Subject: Inquiry on Weihsien and Chefoo - Henrietta Henderson

 

Hello, I hope this email everyone well.  I have been doing family research, and recently began digging into the life of an amazing woman, named Henrietta Henderson (born 1897), who as a member of the missionary group at Chefoo.  She made several trips to China in support of the mission, but the one that I have the most curiosity about is her trip January 1st, 1940. According to historical records, she did not return to England until October 1945.  This means that she could have possibly been a member of the Chefoo staff that the Japanese locked up in Weihsien.

Is there any chance you know anything about this lady, or know where I could do more research?

Thank you very much, I greatly appreciate it.

Bruce Henderson
San Diego, CA

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2009 4:53 PM

Subject: Re: Inquiry on Weihsien and Chefoo - Henrietta Henderson

 

Our  30/6/44  Weihsien internee list includes a Miss H. G. Henderson -- British -- age 43 --  missionary.

 

Contact Overseas Missionary Fellowship (formerly  the China Inland Mission)  10 W. Dry Creek CircleLittleton, CO  80120-4427  USA to find our if Henrietta Henderson was a  missionary sponsored by the China Inland Mission.  If she was a CIM missionary, they should have information in their archives.

 

Mary Previte

 

From: "Bruce Henderson" <sigalarm@gmail.com>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2009 5:08 PM

Subject: Re: Inquiry on Weihsien and Chefoo - Henrietta Henderson

 

Fantastic, thanks for that information. We suspected that she was at
Weihsien, and it's good to have more information. A bit more on
Henrietta, in regards to her missionary service (from the CIM
archives):
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Dear Mr Henderson,

I am happy to say my further research as yielded some success. I have
consulted the original minutes of China Inland Missions’
China
Council. The China Council operated in the field and was composed of
senior CIM missionaries including the Superintendents of provincial
districts. The minutes record discussion of individual missionaries
and detailed records of arrivals and departures from
China.

Unlike the CIM register, these China Council minutes confirm that a
H.G. Henderson served as a missionary with the CIM. She is recorded as
first arriving from
England in China on October 24th 1923.

The minutes further record that
Henderson was awarded her ‘Junior
Missionary Certificate’ on
March 11 1926 and a ‘Senior Missionary on
Certificate’
December 4th 1928.

Henderson was discussed when she requested a furlough from her service
in 1930. Her Superintendent, a Mr. Taylor, is recorded to have ‘made
appreciative reference to her excellent work, but spoke of her having
suffered rheumatism, and to her being tired’. Her request for a
furlough was granted and
Henderson departed from England, via North
America
, on September 27th 1930. Returning to China on October 27th
1931
.

The minutes record a second request for a furlough on
October 11th
1938
. Here Henderson is recorded as being the housekeeper in the
Chefoo Preparatory School.

The
Chefoo School was established by the China Inland Mission in 1880.
Its aim was to provide an education for the children of missionaries
and the business and diplomatic communities.
Chefoo School was a
Christian boarding school, run in accordance with the
China Inland
Mission's regime. Members of staff were required to be full members of
the
Mission.

Further trips recorded in the minutes include:

Departure to
England: December 12th 1938

Return to
China: January 1st 1940

Departure to
England: October 28th 1945

Return to
China October 25th 1946

I hope that the above helps to elucidate the life of H.G. Henderson.
Only a small proportion of the original records of the CIM have
survived but these do include some records of the
Chefoo School. It is
possible that these include further references to
Henderson’s life and
work.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Since then, my cousin Sally has done a bit of digging into her travels
and come up with this list of her travels to and from China:

HENRIETTA  GUNN  HENDERSON’S  TRAVELS   (b.1897)
CHINA INLAND MISSIONARY

ARR./DEPT. DATES      DESTINATION            SHIP NAME &
OTHER INFO.

Arr:  
Oct. 24th 1923 China              26yrs old

Dep:  Set. 24th 1930    Hong Kong via Yokahama Japan ‘Hikawa Maru’
             to Victoria British Columbia   Only Japanese passenger
       ship to survive WW2

Arr:  Nov 24th 1930   Montreal via Quebec to London                 ‘Ascania’
   via Plymouth Used in WW2 ‘39 to ‘49

         Sept. 27t 1931   England to USA

         Oct. 27th 1931   USA to China

       Dec.13th 1938       Shanghai China to Victoria B.C.
‘Empress of Canada’
H. recorded as speaking Chinese.

Arr:  Feb. 10th 1939 New York to Southampton           ‘Aquitania’
Luxury Liner
via Cherbourg            Served as Merchant Ship,
Hospital & Troop ship in WW1 & troop ship in WW2.

Dept:
Dec 16th 1939 To China               Passport #7090
           Issued
Shanghai 23.9.1935

         
Jan. 1st   1940 To China              Henrietta in China
during WW2.

    Under Japanese occupation.

         Oct. 28th 1945 To England

Arr:   Dec. 5th 1945 Hong Kong to Liverpool
‘Oxforshire’
                                          Renamed:
Safinar-E-Arab

          Oct. 25th 1946     To China

Arr:   Dec 9th   1949      Liverpool    ‘Duchess of Richmond’
  to St. John’s Brunswick      Destroyed by fire at
Liverpool docks 1953.

          Jan 1st 1952         Hong Kong to London                ‘Chusan’

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From the looks of it, she returned to China after a brief recovery in
the UK after being freed from Weihsien, and was likely continuing her
work until the communists kicked her out.

Thanks again, and I would dearly welcome any additional information on her.

Bruce H

 

From: Estelle Horne nee Cliff

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2009 7:10 PM

Subject: Re: Inquiry on Weihsien and Chefoo - Henrietta Henderson

 

Yes, Miss Henderson was on the staff of the Chefoo Schools. I wondered why I could not remember what she taught us, The reason is obviously that she was the housekeeper, and not a teacher.

 

Let me just say that the staff were to be much admired, because they had all applied to be missionaries, and then were sent to teach or look after foreign children instead. They took their calling very seriously, and were a wonderful example of Christian living to us as we grew. BUT more than that, when things grew dangerous, and all our foundations were moved, they SO continued in serene assurance of their faith, that we were very seldom afraid.

 

We children did not know what COULD happen to us, but THEY DID. The control of our lives and movements was taken out of the hands of those given responsibilty for us, and were in the hands of ruthless enemies. But they sang with us: God is still on the throne, and we believed it too. The debt we owe them is incalculable.

 

Estelle Cliff Horne

 

From: Jonathan Henshaw

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, May 14, 2009 8:49 AM

Subject: Article from The Times

 

Hello All,

Here is something I came across in The Times which I thought might be of interest to you, another recollection:

From out of a clear blue sky; every reader tells a story.(Features).The Times (London, England) (Oct 9, 2008): p5. (333 words) 

Full Text:COPYRIGHT 2008 The Times

Byline: Jenny Pagliaro

Each week, a Times reader writes a personal tale about a memorable moment in his or her life. Today, Jenny Pagliaro remembers a summer's day in 1945.

It was August 17, 1945 and this day was like most other days in our internment camp at Weihsien, north China. I was 11 years old and had gathered with the other children in our school for a singing lesson in the community church.

The hot weather was rather soporific and our singing was lacklustre. However, we were brought to our feet by the sound of a plane roaring over the church roof and we knew straight away it was not a Japanese aircraft. As it roared over for the second time, we tumbled out on to the ball field and saw it turn to come in again for the third time. It was indeed an American B24. As we waved and shouted the belly of the craft opened up and out fell seven airmen whose parachutes billowed as they floated to the ground and we could see that they would land in the bean fields outside the walls.

With one accord we rushed for the gate, which the Japanese guards were trying to close. We slipped through and, rather like a covey of partridges, disappeared among the beanstalks in search of our rescuers, who were crouched with drawn pistols fearing an attack from Japanese guards. They were met instead by a mob of children!

We escorted them into the camp, passing the guards who had barricaded themselves into the sentry box. Then ensued a time of celebration with thanksgiving services in the church, speeches, parties, chocolate and chewing gum. Peace at last, seeing parents again, and going home to England to start a new life.

One of the airmen said that when he saw us shouting and waving on the field he jumped out without his parachute and it was thrown after him - my hero, Pete Orlich.

Copyright (C) The Times, 2008

Sincerely,
Jonathan Henshaw

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com ; sipabit@videotron.ca

Sent: Thursday, May 14, 2009 11:39 PM

Subject: Re: Article from The Times

 

Thank  you, Jonathan.

 

I'll forward this to Carol Orlich,  liberator Pete Orlich's widow.  She'll love it. 

 

Pete Orlich, age 21,  was radio operator and the youngest member on the rescue  team.   Pete desperately wanted to be chosen for  the rescue team, but feared he would be excluded because he wore glasses.   So when candidates were moving through the medical screenings, he took off his glasses and  memorized the letters on the eye chart by listening to the men in front of him calling out the letters.   To keep his glasses from flying off his head during his parachute drop from the B-24 (The Armored Angel) ,  Pete taped his glasses to his head with pink medical tape.

 

That's how  10-year-old Teddy  Pearson remembers finding Pete in the gaoliang stubble. 

 Teddy  got to Pete Orlich before anyone else. 

 

Here's what Teddy remembers of Pete:

 

"I remember I was the first to reach (American rescuer) Peter Orlich. He had a brush cut (flat top!) when I first saw him. He did not have his cap and he had his glasses taped with pink 'medical' as opposed to Scotch tape around his temples. I remember this very clearly. He was standing (as I remember) in a field of stubble, (Kaoliang? ) I remember him assuming I was a Chinese, maybe I looked like one? when he saw me, barefoot and only wearing shorts. Who knows, but he pointed to some printing in Chinese on his shirt or jacket or vest. There was printing all over in different languages. There was also the stars and stripes. I said to him in my impeccable English, ''Excuse me, sir, but I don't read Chinese.'' He then asked me if I was from the camp, and how did I get out, so I told him the gates were opened. Then he wanted to know where his fellow jumpers were. I walked him back to the camp, and as we got closer I got pre-empted by some adults  :-(  ."

 

Mary Previte

From: Albert de Zutter

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2009 9:06 AM

Subject: Re: website

 

Dear Leopold,

 

I read most of the text you provided. While the story of her marriage and subsequent disappointment is interesting, I found what she was told about the Weihsien camp questionable. If we had a "tennis club," I didn't know about it. Yes, we played tennis, and we even had some tournaments, but we played with bald tennis balls and cracked rackets and had to tie pieces of cat-gut together with knots around to restring rackets. But beauty parlors? Come on! It sounds like she was recounting Japanese propaganda. And not a word about the gaoliang for breakfast and the "stew" -- which was no more than a thin soup -- and hot water for lunch and supper, and the fact that all but those who worked in the kitchens were underweight and malnourished (I was assigned by Dr. Chang to eat in the hospital for two weeks because of my emaciated condition). I concede that the Japanese were looking to the future, as she reports, and that they treated us at Weihsien better than they treated people at many other camps, but there was also some unnecessary meanness, as Joyce Cooke Bradbury reports -- dumping the meat supply on the ground and not allowing our people to deal with it until it started to spoil, etc. I'm sure we are all grateful that our guards were told there might be a reckoning after the war and that they should avoid atrocities -- which they did. But the conditions at Weihsien in no way resembled those at a vacation resort, as the author claims.

 

Albert de Zutter

--- On Sun,
5/17/09, Tapol <tapol@skynet.be> wrote:

From: Tapol <tapol@skynet.be>
Subject:
Re: website
To: weihsien@topica.com
Date:
Sunday, May 17, 2009, 1:13 AM

Dear Gay,

Thanks very much ----

I dont think that you have to transalate the whole thing... Just the texts highlighted in green would be perfect. Those texts are interesting because directly connected to Weihsien and/or the presence of the American troops in China at that moment. Of course if you have the courrage to do the whole thing ---- :-))

Thanks in advance for all our English speaking friends ---

Best regards,

Leopold

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/books/LeGueDuCiel_JacquelineDubois/02.pdf

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/books/LeGueDuCiel_JacquelineDubois/04.pdf

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Gay Talbot Stratford

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, May 16, 2009 7:36 PM

Subject: Re: website

 

Leopold,

If you need help with the translations, letme know.Hope you are both well.

Gay

----- Original Message -----

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, May 16, 2009 4:38 AM

Subject: Re: website

 

--- one of the latest entries on the website, extracts from a book written in French by Jacqueline Dubois, mention quite a few names of Weihsien prisoners and she also mentions the Swedish representative as: Ralph Engström. Is this Mr Egger? I'd be grateful if somebody could volunteer to translate these texts into English ---  ?

best regards,

Leopold

 

From: Ron Bridge

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2009 9:33 AM

Subject: RE: website

 

 

Engstrom who was Sweedish was tied up with the International Red Cross Egger the SWiss consul Qingdao

Ron Bridge

 

PS if you want a little info  the London Daily Mail did an article on me yesterday 16 May 09. The reporter and editor's pen changed a few things I was not allowed sight before publication. See

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1181629/It-happened--I-child-Japanese-prisoner-war.html

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2009 2:00 PM

Subject: Re: website

 

Dear Albert,

Many thanks for your reaction. --- and that is why we must correct all forms of false-information about Weihsien and other camps (all over the world) during WWII. (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/faith/article5663726.ece)

Have a look at http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/NormanCliff/Aftermath/TheNorthChinaMarine/p-01.htm This article published in May 1946 mentions that we were rescued by an "unarmed Australian team" ---- and that we did not suffer !!  (click on the book-picture for the complete text) http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/NormanCliff/Aftermath/TheNorthChinaMarine/txt_TheNorthChinaMarine.htm

I'd like to have more reactions about this French text and this is where the website becomes interesting. The texts will be added to the webpage mentioning Jacqueline Dubois' book. It must be known that she got it all wrong because many people (like her) think that we had a jolly good time during two years and a half !!

Dear Ron, Thanks for your link --- I'll add that too on our website (hope the author won't mind though)

Best regards,

Leopold

 

From: grannydavies@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, May 18, 2009 2:36 AM

Subject: Re: website

 

There was a ralph engstrom in Tientsin once I thought he was with the Danish embassy, could be swiss.Phyllis Evans Davies

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, May 22, 2009 11:12 PM

Subject: Weihsien in documentary, "SO VERY FAR FROM HOME"

 

Mary,

 

In conjunction with Memorial Day (May 25)   here in the United States, a new on-line film site called SnagFilms is featuring the documentary So Very Far From Home.  Produced by Bill Einreinhofer and Jiang Weihui, the hour-long program tells the firsthand stories of Weihsien, Lunghwa, Chapei and the other brutal "civilian prison camps" set-up in Japanese-occupied China during World War II.

 

The program includes vintage footage unearthed at the National Archives, including scenes of the Weihsien Presbyterian Mission compound circa 1934.

 

Some of those who attended the 2005  60th anniversary of our liberation reunion at Weihsien are featured in this film.

 

SnagFilms is a free site, but you'll need a broadband connection. Here is the web address: http://www.snagfilms.com/

 

Mary Previte

 

From: Mitch Krayton

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, May 23, 2009 2:22 AM

Subject: Re: Weihsien in documentary, "SO VERY FAR FROM HOME"

 

Mary,

Thanks for this tip and for keeping the memory alive.

No one should ever forget what you all had to endure.

Mitch Krayton

 

From: Terri Stewart

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, May 23, 2009 5:32 PM

Subject: Re: Weihsien in documentary, "SO VERY FAR FROM HOME"

 

Wow. Just spent the hour watching this movie and being able to grasp more of what my great-aunt (Ruth Kunkel) wrote about in her letters of the camp, including the guard nicknamed Gold-Tooth. Thank you for passing this info along and I have now passed it onto my family to view.

 

Terri Stewart

 

From: "Mitch Krayton" <mitch@digital-res.com>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Saturday, May 23, 2009 6:39 PM

Subject: Re: Weihsien in documentary, "SO VERY FAR FROM HOME"

 

Ø      My wife Linda and I watched this incredible documentary and were
> speechless. The narration and editing were compelling. The quality of
> the video was superb. The heartfelt and honest emotions of joy, pain and
> reunion were clearly captured in the interviews.
>
> How wonderful that everyone's faces, voices and photos are now preserved
> in such a compelling manner. I hope that Leopold can post a link on his
> site and that someone can get a copy to archive in case this link
> disappears. The only issue for me was that the audio was out of sync.
> Could be a result of the transfer from
PAL to NTSC. No worries though,
> because that did little to spoil that story for us. We feel like we know
> each of you a bit more so thanks for sharing.
>
> Mitch Krayton

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, May 23, 2009 8:02 PM

Subject: Re: Weihsien in documentary, "SO VERY FAR FROM HOME"

 

Thank you so very much for this response.

 

I'll pass it along to the producer, Bill Einreinhofer.

 

Mary Taylor Previte

 

From: Dwight W. Whipple

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, May 23, 2009 9:19 PM

Subject: Re: Weihsien in documentary, "SO VERY FAR FROM HOME"

 

I echo the comments re the Weihsien documentary and sent it to others in our family who also were interned there.  We arrived in the camp on March 20, 1943 and were repatriated, all eleven of us in the Walton/Whipple families (CIM) in September of that year.  My memories as a seven year old are still vivid.  The documentary is such a treasure.  We are trying to find a way to preserve it.  Thanks so much, Mary and those who made it possible and a reality.

~Dwight W Whipple

 

From: Ron Bridge

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, May 25, 2009 9:15 PM

Subject: RE: British and Commonwealth Internees of Japan 1942/5

 

Dear Weihsien readers.

I realise that this will not affect or interest many readers, but to some out there I think it might be  of interest . To forestall the inevitable inquiries the list of names is NOT available on any web site.

On 24th May 2009 ( the 24th May being called Empire Day pre 1945 and a date for school sports) I had the privilege of placing a book of the name of all British who were interned in perpetual custody of the Church of St Michael's Cornhill London. A 17th Century church built by Sir Christopher Wren. I attach the preface to the Book for interest. The Book was funded by the Association of British Civilain Internees Far East Region which closed on the same day.

Ultimately copies will be placed in the Impwerial War Museum London, and the War Museums in Aukland, Canberra and Ottawa if they should want them.

Rgds

Ron Bridge

 

This Memorial Book has been placed in St Michaels Cornhill, a church nearest to the Bank intersection in the City of London a point that was considered the center of Empire in the 19th and early 20th Centuries. It is dedicated to the British civilians  who were captured and interned by the Japanese after the outbreak of the hostilities on 8th December 1941. Many of these civilians had heeded the call from London to stay at their posts during a rapidly deteriorating political situation in the Far East during 1941. Included in the lists are merchants, teachers, policemen, nurses, colonial administrators, missionaries, indeed people from all walks of life, together with their families. - in fact, it records all British civilians who were interned prior to and after the "diplomatic" exchange of August 1942.

 

At the time, the term "British" encompassed all of His Majesty's subjects in the British Commonwealth. However, those people who were the direct responsibility of a Dominion government have been separated out in this book.

 

The indigenous inhabitants of Hong Kong, the Straits Settlements, Burma and other Far East Colonies are not included unless they were actually interned, which is not to say that they did not suffer under Japanese rule.

 

The Japanese did not incarcerate all Caucasian British as they permitted some of the aged and infirm to remain out of the camps but under some form of curfew. These individuals are not included.

 

The precise number of British civilians interned by the Japanese during World War Two is not known. Immediately post war, various documents represented the number as ranging from 15,012 to 18,486. However, studies made in the 1950s suggested that 19,800 British passport holders were interned together with 870 Australians, 80 New Zealanders and 200 Canadians making a total of 20,950 British Commonwealth citizens

of whom 1,000 died in captivity.

 

This Memorial Book includes the names of 19,217 Civilian, 1,551 Dominion and 32 Colonial,  a total listing of 20,800, compiled from surviving camp nominal rolls. At the side of each name is an internment camp, in most cases this is the only camp in which the individual was interned. However, for some people the precise camp has not been identified, and a geographic area is quoted. For others an arbitrary choice has been made, notably in the former Netherlands East Indies where people fleeing Singapore and Malaya were moved between up to nine camps.

 

Included are civilians who, although evacuated in late 1942 to southern Africa, had been interned and sometimes tortured in places like Outram Road, Bridge House and Forfar Road.

 

No attempt has been to differentiate Merchant Navy personnel, as those captured in port were generally treated as civilians, and those captured on the high seas as military PoWs. (There are numerous exceptions to this rule, especially in the case of those captured in the Atlantic by the Germany Navy and interned in Java or Japan.) The listing also contains the names of a few volunteer forces personnel, who were for some reason treated as civilians and of the members of the military nursing services who were all placed in civilian camps. Whilst other civilians were placed in Military Camps. Indeed, there

was little consistency in treatment of non military Britons.

 

This Memorial Book is not intended to be an exhaustive source of genealogical data, neither can it be considered the legal basis for establishing internment by the Japanese. The events occurred over 60 year ago and it has not always been possible to obtain forenames from the often fragmentary camp lists which have survived in a myriad of British and foreign institutions. Given the limitations, the omission of any forename, or indeed any individual is regretted. Deliberately omitted are Dates of Birth, Dates of Death and Maiden names. These were considered, but the concept rejected for reasons of consistency, of space and on the basis that the data was only available in some cases.

 

For general assistance in the preparation of this book I am indebted to Richard Gunning (Once of Stanley Camp)

 

Finally, it must be re-iterated that whilst every care has been taken in compiling this Book from all known sources throughout the world, it cannot be considered definitive evidence of internment by the Japanese for any legal purpose whatsoever. Any omission or inaccuracy will almost certainly be due to the incomplete nature of the records. For

any and all mistakes, the compiler offers his sincere apologies.

 

 

Ronald William Bridge MBE AFC

Once of Weihsien Camp

March 2009

 

From: Mpether

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, May 25, 2009 10:04 PM

Subject: RE: British and Commonwealth Internees of Japan 1942/5

 

Dear Ron,

 

What a timely and thoughtful action yourself and ABCIFER.

 

Whilst the numbers of men, women and children still with us who underwent the awful experience of internment throughout the Far East is fast diminishing, from my own experience there is a strong resurgence of interest and need to see the memory secured by their children, grandchildren around the world. Organisations I am a member of, such as COFEPOW and the Malayan Volunteers Group have rapidly expanding international memberships from families connected with the Far East at the time and people now living in the region.

 

I have personal connections with the events through family being interned in Changi, Sime Road and the camp at Iltis Huk in Tsingtao and have formed friendships here in New Zealand with internees and POWs who were in Sumatra, Java and Borneo.

 

Please let me know if you would like any assistance in approaching the Auckland War Memorial Museum.

 

I would be interested to know what is happening with the records of ABCIFER insofar as their archiving and would appreciate your reply on that point.

 

Regards,

 

Michael Pether,

Auckland,
New Zealand
.

 

From: Ron Bridge

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, May 26, 2009 6:46 PM

Subject: Re:Marjorie McLorn

 

 

Ladies and Gentlemen,

I have had an inquiry into the whereabouts or what hanppened to Marjorie McLorn, b 1931 in Block 61 Room 9.

Her roommate Joyce Kerry is anxious to trace.

If she is on the topica circuit or if anyone knows her is please let me know either by replying to this or driect on rwbridge@freeuk.com

Thanks

Ron

 

From: Fred & Coral Dreggs

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, May 27, 2009 1:13 AM

Subject: Re: Weihsien in documentary, "SO VERY FAR FROM HOME"

 

Hi Mary,

 

Many thanks for advising about the availability of the above-mentioned documentary.

 

I got on to the web address OK and located a small photo depicting what appear to be internees lining up outside a sort of kitchen. This was found under the heading of 'So Very Far From Home'.  My problem is that I could do nothing further from that point to in order to view the doc. Have I done something wrong? Would you ,or someone who has been successful, please lead me. With thanks in advance,

 

Regards,  Fred (aka Alfie)

 

PS I do have Broadband.

 

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, May 27, 2009 7:01 AM

Subject: Re: Weihsien in documentary, "SO VERY FAR FROM HOME"

 

dear Fred,

I have the same problem. I sent a message to snagfilms and got this answer: (see below)

I haven't tried "mozilla" yet but I'll let you know --- My computer had a "fatal error" recently so I'm trying to get everything working again.

Dear Gay,

thanks for the translation --- In a day or two it will be on the website --- in English !!

--- all the best,

Leopold

 

From: Estelle Horne nee Cliff

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Wednesday, May 27, 2009 9:41 AM

Subject: RE: British and Commonwealth Internees of Japan 1942/5

 

Dear Ron

Many, many thanks to you and Richard and all the volunteers who edited the lists for the memorial book, and worked so hard for ABCIFER.
We owe you so much.

Estelle Cliff Horne

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2009 2:24 AM

Subject: Fwd: Weihsien in documentary, "SO VERY FAR FROM HOME"

 

Here's a suggestion from Producer Bill Einreinhofer  that may help those of you who have had difficulty connecting to the documentary about Japanese-operated internment camps in China

 


From: bill@paradox-communications.net

Sent: 5/27/2009 10:11:04 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time
Subj: Re: Fwd: Weihsien in documentary,
"SO VERY FAR FROM HOME"

 

Try this link. It should take you directly to the film.

 

http://www.snagfilms.com/films/title/so_very_far_from_home/



Bill Einreinhofer
Paradox Communications, Inc.
973.495.3111 mobile
Skype ID bill.einreinhofer
bill@paradox-communications.net

 

From: Pamela Masters

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, May 29, 2009 1:56 AM

Subject: Re: Weihsien in documentary, "SO VERY FAR FROM HOME"

 

This is GREAT documentary -- totally in sync, and such fun to watch! Thanks again Bill for making it. -- Pamela

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, June 01, 2009 4:11 PM

Subject: Raymond Hanchulak, Weihsien liberator

 

What memories does anyone have of Raymond Hanchulak, medic on the "DUCK MISSION"  that liberated Weihsien?

 

Some time ago, I recall someone's writing that Hanchulak had  given him  his boots.

 

Scheduled  to give a speech later this month about my tracking down the heroes who liberated Weihsien, I'd like more information about  Raymond Hanchulak.

 

When I tracked down members of the DUCK MISSION in 1997,  Raymond had died a year before.   When I found  his widow,  Helen Hanchulak told me she  had married Raymond many years after the war. She knew nothing about Weihsien.  She was flabbergasted when I told her about her hero husband and the liberation of  the camp. She said Raymond was trained to keep secrets -- having served all of his adult life in the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) and  later in the Central Intelligence Service (CIA).  She begged me to tell her everything I knew. 

 

Liberator Tad Nagaki, close friends with Raymond Hanchulak, has helped with some information.  But I've felt frustrated to know so little about this American hero.

 

Born  August 23, 1916, Raymond was the oldest member of the rescue team, almost 29 when he helped  liberate Weihsien.

 

How I wish now that I had started my search a few years earlier so that I could have talked with Raymond Hanchulak and with Peter Orlich, who had died before I started.

 

Mary Taylor Previte

 

From: Mitch Krayton

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, June 01, 2009 9:07 PM

Subject: Re: Raymond Hanchulak, Weihsien liberator

 

Mary

Instead of fretting over things you cannot change, please take pride in all the marvelous and wonderful things you have accomplished on this project.

Think of the wonderful news you have given to Helen that helped make her husband's memories even better.

Mitch Krayton

 

From: berean@xplornet.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, June 01, 2009 10:56 PM

Subject: Re: Raymond Hanchulak, Weihsien liberator

 

Thank you for what you have done.   Years ago Kathleen and I started calling the Steigers listed in the  Portland, Oregon phone book as that is where Major Steiger had listed his home town.  We gave up too soon--I think.   We felt rather embarassed calling.  Now I would feel differently.  Obviously we got nowhere--as by that time Major Steiger was no longer living in Portland.   I am not sure at this point if we even explained who and why we were trying to locate him to the ones we called--.  that has been years and years ago. 

 

But years ago I wrote James Moore (he answered as if he was writing to a Houghton instead of a Horton) But he said he had not kept up with any of the team---so again we dropped the idea of locating any of them. Really hadn't given that much thought basing it on experience above.   So please do not blame yourself.

 

 

Before I was married I stayed with a college classmate in little St. Paul, Minnesota.  My parents were in Indonesia at that time.   I got the idea of trying to locate my uncle on my Dad's side--using an address I had.in that area.    We had a day of riding busses or what have you trying to locate him--think we had tried to call--do not remember.   We got nowhere  I am not sure if I wrote my parents about it.  All the 11 years for my Dad and 10 for my Mom when they were in Indonesia--we never talked on the phone to them.

 

We were married 8 years and had four children before they met my husband.  They came home to 3 married children and 11 grandchildren they had not met.  They had met Stanley's wife but had not met Kathleen's and my husbands.  they got to only attend Rowland's wedding--and the rest of us didn't get to attend that wedding in Oklahoma--couldn't afford to travel then.

 

Something interesting is happening in our daughter (who lives next door to us) in her family.   Her second oldest and oldest son is getting married on June 12th.  They started courting (no hand holding etc) the end of January.   Not too long after that they got engaged and now getting married.   Her family was in our church in Oregon--way back in the 1970's.   Her parents were not in church.  Mahlon knocked on their door inviting them--and kept going back.  The dad was from a Christian home--but backslidden, the Mom was not from a Christian home.  Long story made short--my folks were in our church the too, -Larry, the father was called to preach, graduated from Bible College in Indiana, came back to Oregon//Washington, pastored inn Washington, then now in Oregon.   At the time we met them they had 2 children.  They saw we had 6 children--later a 7th added--the Lord impressed on them they should have more children.   Now they have 15 children--twice as many as we did though we had two miscarriages in first trimester--one of theirs is in heaven.   So now our grandson is marrying their fourth youngest.   When we visited them a year ago the girls--at that time there were 7 unmarried daughters--asked if they could adopt us as grandparents-(both sets of their grandparents are in heaven)-we consented--so now Tiffanie will be doubly our granddaughter.  She will be moving to Canada.--now after June 12th they will only have 5 unmarried daughters-the youngest is 15-16 years old. 

 

Now another interesting page of the story.  Tiffanie has a 28 year old cousin named Roy Taylor, (her mother's maiden name).   Now he is engaged to our oldest granddaughter next door, Elisia, who is 23 years old. They have been engaged a week now.   Their engagement happened very fast but they are very agreed--they discuss the Bible all the time on the phone.--8 hours driving distance away from here.   We will lose Elisia to the states unless God calls Roy up here.   He is a very talented carpenter with his own business--His Dad is not saved but his mom is saved.  So we are going to miss her very much.  She has been a big help in the music at church as has had voice lessons over the years and piano lessons--also she is very good on the computer.  Our daughter Valerie is writing a Trailblazer Club material which is being  used by mission churches or others--can be used for clubs, children's church--really too much material  for Sunday School.   Elisia does the graphics for it.   She will continue to do it long distance as her fiancé will buy her computer etc--he is not into that.   He looks like a Viking--has some Swedish blood in him--is 6'4".  She is tall as well--so they really complement each other.  She is blondish as well.  She has the big bone build of a Scandinavian--carries herself very well.   She is still recuperating from hyperthyroidism--she took the radio active pill as didn't want surgery in case it would damage her vocal chords.  

 

Anyway, it has been exciting to see how God has kept these young people for each other.   Our grandson and fiancée will reserve their first kiss for after the wedding.

 

He puts out a magazine for young men, called A Servant's Heart and has been doing it now since he was 17 and he is now 21.  She is 23.   The family has leased a laser printer for their printing ministry as they do tracts for people as well. 

 

It was something how God impressed Mahlon that we should stop in and see this family on our holiday last year--We had not seen them for several years.  And now all of this.  The couple have over 40 grandchildren already and 8 who do not have children yet.   They are a Godly family.  all of the children and grandchildren are in church.  And to have had a tiny part inn their lives--God uses all the links and we were just one tiny link. 

 

Mahlon resigned the church January 18th--a young Canadian couple with two sweet little girls have taken over the church--moved down in April. from Alberta.  |Our grandson did the preaching until new pastor came--our grandson is assistant or associate pastor or pastor in training.   He is enrolled in Bible training by correspondence and is in 3rd year--had first year in a Bible institute away from here. 

 

We have seen real answers to prayer and are so gratified with what God is doing.  We started the church.  Then were able to buy a building from a Lutheran group who were merging two congregations--the building has been  paid for a couple of years now.  The former parsonage was bought by one of our members-- an elderly lady who took on the job of being caretaker of the property--she sold the house to the new pastor--the house is right next door to church so it was so crucial to have the right person there--so God answered prayer that way.  She moved into a condo which is quite an adjustment for her as she is very much of an outdoor person--and she has always lived in a house. 

 

Several years ago we were involved in finding a missing son for one of our members--He was Canadian but had been loaned to the CIA--they had reprogrammed his mind--even to showing him a grave--saying his mother was dead.  it was over 20 years they hadn't seen each other.  So he didn't remember he had sisters--etc.  he had several social security numbers etc.  It was a miracle how we found him--It was very scary for him when he was found because of his past with the CIA.  He never moved back to Canada.   Long story with a sad ending that just happened last year.  We are not sure if his 90 year old mother is still living but son preceded her in death.

 

What we couldn't understand is that she didn't want to put out a notice in papers she knew to find him--didn't want to embarrass him--We didn't do that--found him through other means. 

 

Trust you are doing o.k.  We hope to see Kathleen after we are finished with the wedding.  She is too tired to do any travelling anymore and it is very doubtful she will get to wedding--They are very close to our grandchildren as before her illness they would come up once or twice a year to visit. we we would go down there.once or twice a year--.   We have our property up for sale since last July--we live off the grid so it will take a special couple to buy it--We are waiting on the Lord's guidance.  He might just want us to stay here.   

 

 

Love, Audrey

From: Tapol

To: weihsien@topica.com ; Greg Leck ; Albert de Zutter ; Janette & Pierre @ home

Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2009 9:55 AM

Subject: japanese guard uniform ---

 

Hello,

--- if you type in the search engine: "japanese guard uniform" you will reach our interesting conversation about the colour of that uniform ---

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/TedPearson/text/JapUniform.htm

Thanks to Greg Leck, we have an additional document attesting that it was "olive" --- in summer!

best regards & thanks Greg ---

Leopold

 

From: rod miller

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Friday, June 12, 2009 2:02 PM

Subject: Re: Chefoo etc Woops...

 

Sorry I gave you the wrong file.

It is this one that contains the report.

Title
Japan exchange of British and Japanese subjects - evacuation Agreement
Barcode
177535
Series number
A981
Series accession number
A981/4
Control symbol
JAP 116
Contents date range
1941 - 1942
Location
Canberra
Access status
Open
Date of decision
1 Jun 1973

http://naa12.naa.gov.au/scripts/imagine.asp?B=177535&I=1&SE=1

Rod


At 10:38 PM 6/12/2009, you wrote:

Hi

I've noticed some of you mention Chefoo in here.
There is a brief 1941 report on
China in the following file in the Australian archives that may or may not be of interest.

Title
Japan - First Exchange of Civilians
Barcode
184378
Series number
A989
Series accession number
A989/1
Control symbol
1943/460/10/1
Contents date range
1942 - 1944
Location
Canberra
Access status
Open
Date of decision
7 Mar 1976

To view the file log into the archives as a guest
http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/recordsearch/index.aspx
Then click on the link below.

http://naa12.naa.gov.au/scripts/ItemDetail.asp?M=0&B=184378

Covering letter for the report is on page 16, the report is page 17 - 21

Regards
Rod

 

From: berean@xplornet.com

To: Tapol

Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2009 10:56 PM

Subject: Re: japanese guard uniform ---

 

Audrey writing.  Miss Evelyn Davey, now Huebner chuckled when I told her that there had been quite a discussion about color of guard uniform.  Without hesitation she said they were khaki--green --usual color of uniforms.  

 

From: Jonathan Henshaw

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, June 22, 2009 3:44 PM

Subject: Visiting Shandong

 

Hi Weihsieners,

I am writing for advice on people/places to see connected to the camp since I will be making a trip to Weifang at the beginning of July. I am currently in
Beijing and might be making a stop in Yantai on the way south. After Shandong I will be in Hongkong. Any suggestions/contacts/questions anyone might have would be much appreciated.

Sincerely,
Jonathan Henshaw

 

From: "Donald Menzi" <dmenzi@earthlink.net>

To: "weihsien" <weihsien@topica.com>

Cc: "shude" <suishude@sohu.com>; "Shude" <suishude@126.com>; "shude-1" <suishude@sina.com>

Sent: Monday, June 22, 2009 7:25 PM

Subject: Your Visit to Weihsien

 

Ø      Jonathan,
>
> You should definitely make Sui Shude your main contact point in Weihsien.  He is with their the municipal government office that was key in setting up the 2005 celebration and the documentaries about the weihsien camp.  He's also a great guy, extremely fluent in English and will be very happy to help you.  I've included the three email addresses that I have for him in the cc line because I'm not sure which are still in active use.
>
> Enjoy the visit. They've done a great job in memorializing the Weihsien camp and those who were interned there.
>
> Please say hello to Shude for me.
>
> Donald Menzi
>
> P.S.  Any chance you're related to my old Hebrew professor, Richard Henshaw?
>
> DM

 

From: "Tapol" <tapol@skynet.be>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2009 9:13 AM

Subject: Fw: Your Visit to Weihsien

 

Ø     
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "pander" <
pander.nl@skynet.be>
> To: <
weihsien@topica.com>; "Jonathan Henshaw" <Jonathan.Henshaw@ualberta.ca>
> Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2009
10:12 AM
> Subject:
Re: Your Visit to Weihsien
>
>
>> Dear Jonathan,
>> --- as Don wrote, Mr. Sui Shude is the best host you
could ever have for
>> the
>> visit of Weifang and of course the "old" Weihsien concentration camp. For
>> the website (
http://www.weihsien-paintings.org ) we would all be eager to
>> share your photos/videos and experiences of your visit --- Do send them my
>> way when they will be ready --- thanks in advance, --- Best regards, ---
>> Leopold
>> PS You will have all the info by clicking on the *.gif-file attached.

 

From: <sigalarm@gmail.com>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Wednesday, June 24, 2009 8:28 PM

Subject: Ettie Henderson - Continued Search

 

Ø      Hello all, I can't thank the people on this list enough for their help
> in uncovering the history of my relative, Henrietta "Ettie" Henderson
> who was a member of the staff at Chefoo.
>
> Since the last time I have posted,  have come into possession of
> additional information, and now I need your help again if you would be
> so kind.
>
> Below are links to 2 pictures taken at the Chefoo school in 1938, one is
> of the staff at the Prep school where we think Henrietta was, and the
> second was the girls school.  It know it may not be possible, but could
> you have a look and see if any of them match your recollection for her?
>
> Prep School Staff Photo:
>
http://andstillipersist.com/wp-content/photo/scotland/Chefoo_Prep_Staff_1938.jpg
>
> Girls School Staff Photo:
>
http://andstillipersist.com/wp-content/photo/scotland/1938_Chefoo_Girls_School_Staff2.jpg
>
>
> Thank you so very much for your time and your help.
>
> Bruce Henderson
> San Diego, CA

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, June 29, 2009 1:36 PM

Subject: Another Eric Liddell movie

 

The November-December 2008 issue of Mission Frontier reports in a 4-page article that another movie about Eric Liddell is in the works, being produced by Wang Zi Yin,  a Chinese Christian film maker based in Los Angeles.  The article says plans include filming in China.  Premiers are being discussed for cities including London, ParisTorontoMoscowTokyoHong Kong, Singapore. According to the article, the screen play has already been written,  however, that announcement may be premature since former Chefoo School student, Stephen Metcalf,  has been approached for an interview in London in July.

 

This Mission Frontier article is being circulated along with letters encouraging financial support of the production.

 

In Weihsien, Stephen  became Eric Liddell's assistant in athletic activities and helped Eric mend broken equipment.  Not long before Eric died, he gave Stephen his running shoes.  Stephen was so profoundly moved by Eric's message of "Love your enemies" -- pray for the Japanese -- that in Weihsien Stephen made a promise to God that if God would get him out of that place, he would serve God as a missionary to Japan.  Stephen kept that promise and is now retired and living in London. .

 

Stephen's moving speech at the Eric Liddell monument near the hospital in Weihsien during our  2005 reunion celebration made headlines around the world.

 

Mary Previte

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2009 2:01 PM

Subject: UPDATE on Weihsien Girl Guides and on Eric Liddell movie

 

Here's  an update on a couple of Weihsien projects.

 

GIRL GUIDES and BROWNIES IN WEIHSIEN -- a social history:


A book to celebrate 100 years of Girl Guides (called Girl Scouts in the
USA)  is to include a chapter about Girl Guides and Brownies in Weihsien.  Commissioned by London Publisher, Aurum Press,  to write a social  history of Girl Guides,  author Janie Hampton, hopes to have it ready for the publisher by Christmas  and published in Spring 2010.  Janie decided to include Weihsien after finding  in the archives of the Girl Guide Association across the road from Buckingham Palace in London a logbook from the Brownie Pack in Weihsien.   Janie writes, " This is a moving and extraordinary document of courage.  Brown Owl must have been a strong woman to keep the pack going so effectively."   Amazing as it may seem, through former Chefoo School students who were interned in Weihsien, Janie tracked down "Brown Owl,"   Evelyn Davey Heubener, in a retirement  community in Seattle and interviewed her by telephone. 

 

If you have your own stories or memories to contribute, send to hampton.oxford@dial.pipex.co.

 

ERIC LIDDELL  MOVIE SEQUEL:

 

Movie producer Ken Wales reports that a financial backer in Australia has stepped forward for his ERIC LIDDELL movie project after the original backer  was wiped out in the recession.   Wales plans to shoot the film in Australia.  The story will pick up where Chariots of Fire left off. and will include extensive coverage of the Weihsien chapter of Eric Liddell's life.  Wales says the movie  will be a story -- part fictionalized, not a documentary.

 

Mary Previte

 

From: Jonathan Henshaw

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, July 27, 2009 3:21 AM

Subject: Notes from a trip

 

Hello Weihsieners,

I have written a short note in .pdf format about my trip up to Weihsien in June that includes a few pictures-- it is available here:
http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/JonathanHenshaw/VisitToWeifang/Letter_to_Weihsieners.pdf.Thanks to Mr Pander for putting it online. The visit was a definite success for me, and I am really quite thankful, both to all of you here, and to Mr Sui Shude and Mr Jeff Liu in Weifang and Yantai, for their hospitality and kindness.

Sincerely,
Jonathan Henshaw

 

From: Mitch Krayton

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, July 27, 2009 8:51 AM

Subject: Re: Notes from a trip

 

Thanks for this wonderful report and photos. Thanks also for doing some additional research for me about Helen Burton. This site has brought together a wonderful group of people who won't let the past fade away.

Thanks again to all that make this possible.

Mitch Krayton

 

From: Carol Ann Vaughn

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, July 27, 2009 10:47 PM

Subject: CIM School for MKs in Chefoo/Yantai

 

Greetings.

 

I apologize if I am intruding on a personal list or thread. 

 

I am researching the lives of Freddie Crawford and Minnie Crawford Jones to complete a biography of Martha Foster Crawford and T. P. Crawford.  It has been ten years since I completed my dissertation about Martha Crawford, and I am pleased to have access to more threads and people now, thanks to the internet and on-line databases.

 

Martha and T. P. Crawford adopted Minnie and Freddie in 1876.  Minnie married the rather well-known British Baptist missionary Alfred Jones, who was killed in a mudslide in 1905; and I am attempting to follow-up on her whereabouts in the U. S. and/or Great Britain in the early 20th century.

 

Freddie Crawford was sent to the new China Inland Mission School in Chefoo in 1881, where he was apparently was one of the first students.  Unfortunately, I have come to a dead-end of information about Freddie.  (We do not have Martha Crawford's diaries after 1881, although I am on a quest to see if any more survived.)

 

I plan to try to look at the CIM School Records, but if anyone here has any ideas or suggestions for further possible areas of investigation about Freddie Crawford in the Shandong area in the 1880s-1890s, I would be very appreciative. 

 

Sincerely,

 

Carol Ann Vaughn Cross

 

Samford University

Core Curriculum

Birmingham, Alabama

cavaughn@samford.edu

 

From: Terri Stewart

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, July 27, 2009 11:53 PM

Subject: Re: Notes from a trip

 

Thank you as well, Jonathan for the wonderful and updated report and the pix of the buildings. I am glad to know that they are being kept up in one way or another, even though I have never been there nor likely will be able to make the trip (my great-aunt was there in the camp). I appreciate what you have done!

 

Terri Stewart

(for Ruth Kunkle)

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 2:05 AM

Subject: Re: CIM School for MKs in Chefoo/Yantai

 

Ian Grant, editor of Chefoo School Magazine, says the Chefoo Boys School registry shows that Alfred Foster Crawford was enrolled from 1881 to 1886.  It does not give his date of birth, nor his place of birth.  It states that his parent/guardian were at 142 Morgan Street in Knoxville, Tenn, USA, which might be where they went after he left school.

 

Mary Previte

 

From: <sigalarm@gmail.com>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Friday, July 31, 2009 4:54 AM

Subject: RE: CIM School for MKs in Chefoo/Yantai

 

Ø      Hello Carol.
>
> Having recently done a significant amount of research into Chefoo, I can
> possibly give you a bit of advice. 
>
> The collection held at the Billy Graham centre in
Illinois is actually
> quite good.  They have a large collection of documents associated with
> the CIM, and some related to Chefoo.
>
> The collection at SOAS in
London have a great deal more in terms of
> photographs and information about Chefoo specifically.
>
> I strongly recommend contacting either archive:
>
> Ed Hood at SOAS:
docenquiry@soas.ac.uk
> Wayne Weber at Billy Graham Center Archives:
BGCArc@wheaton.edu
>
> They may even be able to let you know how much information they have on
> the people you are researching.
>
> Feel free to follow up directly with me if you would like as well: 
> sigalarm (at) gmail (dot) com
>
> Sincerely
>
> Bruce Henderson

 

From: Jonathan Henshaw

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 12:59 PM

Subject: More photos uploaded

 

Dear Weihsieners,

Leopold Pander has kindly uploaded a few more  photos from my trip to Weifang last month. The link is below:

http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/JonathanHenshaw/VisitToWeifang/Photos/p_photos_01.htm

Thanks again to everyone who helped make the trip a success.

Best regards,
Jonathan Henshaw

 

From: "Carol Ann Vaughn" <cavaughn@samford.edu>

To: <weihsien@topica.com>

Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 6:56 PM

Subject: RE: CIM School for MKs in Chefoo/Yantai

 

Ø      Dear Bruce,
>
> I cannot thank you enough for taking time to respond so helpfully to my query.  I am looking forward to pursuing these avenues you have mentioned.
>
> After a ten-year hiatus from this particular research, I am enjoying the benefits of the internet. It has been more than ten years since I visited the Chefoo area.
>
> I have located information about an Alfred Foster Crawford, the same age of the man for whom I am searching, who survived the _Titanic_ disaster.  I hope that the school's documents will help me confirm whether or not it was the same person. 
>
> I found a lot of excellent material at Yale regarding the missionary community's evacuation from Chefoo during the Boxer Uprising, and I am interested in more on that as well as material on the missionaries' return in 1902. 
>
> I have a sabbatical coming up in the next year or so, and I think this will be my reason to visit the
Graham Center and various repositories in England, funding permitting.
>
> I appreciate being in contact with you.  Thank you.
>
> Sincerely,
> Carol Ann
>
> Carol Ann Vaughn
> Core Curriculum
>
Samford University
>
cavaughn@samford.edu

 

From: Mitch Krayton

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, August 04, 2009 2:41 AM

Subject: Re: More photos uploaded

 

Jonathan,

Thanks for the visual documentation.

Again, much appreciated. Leopold great job hosting as always.

Mitch Krayton

 

From: MTPrevite@aol.com

To: weihsien@topica.com

Sent: Tuesday, August 04, 2009 11:19 AM

Subject: WEIHSIEN BIRDS -- Jamie Taylor's diary for a Naturalist Badge

 

Here's an introduction to WEIHSIEN BIRDS on Leopold Pander's Weihsien web site  http://www.weihsien-paintings.org/JamesTaylor/indexFrame.htm 

 

Leopold has created a masterpiece with  my brother's diary.

Mary Previte

 

 

                        Jamie Taylor’s Bird Watching Diary 

                                             1944 -1945

                        By Mary Taylor Previte   (Jamie’s little sister)   

In 1944 and 1945,  James  “Jamie” Taylor, 14 years old,  filled a 4" x 6"  notebook  with carefully-penned observations –  about putting his hand into a  sparrow's nest and finding babies,  counting bustards flying overhead,  welcoming flowers that announced the spring, listening to cicadas beginning to buzz,  numbering the leaves sprouting on a plant.  Logged  to earn his  Boy Scout Naturalist badge,  he wrote ordinary, boyish  stuff .

 Ordinary?

 Jamie Taylor was writing in a crowded Japanese internment camp in China, a world of barrier walls, electrified wires, guard dogs, prisoner numbers, roll calls,  and hunger.  

 The cover says simply:  J. Taylor    Weihsien Birds.   J. Taylor was James Hudson Taylor, III, a student in the Chefoo School for the children of Protestant missionaries in China and great grandson of pioneer missionary to China, J. Hudson Taylor.  Weihsien was the Weihsien Civilian Assembly Center in China’s Shandong Province.  Weihsien held 1.500 Allied prisoners behind barrier walls and electrified wires.

In 1944, when Jamie started writing his bird watching diary, we four Taylor children had already been separated for four years from our missionary parents, with warring armies an impenetrable blockade.  With a school full of the children of Protestant missionaries to China, we and our classmates in the Chefoo School had had been marched off to internment camp.  With 1,500 prisoners in Weihsien, we had been rounded up as “enemy aliens,” each with a prisoner number. It would be another year and a half before the war ended and we would see our father and mother again.   Missionary teachers tried to be substitute parents. 

In a prison camp, how do you arm yourself against fear? Our teachers' answer was to fashion a protective womb around our psyches, insulating and cushioning us with familiar routines: daily school and work details. 

Structure. Structure. Structure.

Our teachers taught us exactly what to expect. They marched us off to breakfast for a splash of steaming gao liang gruel (animal feed, even by Chinese standards). They trooped us back to our dormitory, mug and spoon in hand, to scrub the floor. We grouped for morning prayers, and sang: 

God is still on the throne;

And He will remember His own.

His promise is true;

He will not forget you.

God is still on the throne. 

We lined up for inspection. Were we clean? Were we neat? Did we have our mending done? We settled down on our steamer-trunk “beds” for school: English, Latin, French, history, Bible.

Structure. It was our security blanket.

One of the predictable routines was school.  Yes, school would go on – even in the shadow of guard towers. So would Boy Scouts and Girl Guides, Cub Scouts and Brownies. We practiced semaphore and Morse Code during daily roll calls. We practiced tying knots -- reef, bowline, round-turn-two-half-hitches.  Scout leaders like Stanley Houghton and Guide leaders like Inez Phare, Brownie leaders like “Brown Owl”   Evelyn Davey expected students to work on badges. In the shadow of the barrier walls and under the eyes of uniformed Japanese guards, we worked on badges – reading badges,  hiking badges, folk singing badges, naturalist badges. Yes, and do a good deed every day – even when your hands are freezing from making coal balls to fuel the stoves or your  knife or thumb nail is bloody from the Saturday  “battle-with-the-bedbugs.”   Girl Guides were expected to embroider badges for the Boy Scouts.  

Written for his Naturalist Badge, Jamie’s bird watching diary is so much more than a 14-year-old Boy Scout training a sparrow or watching poplar catkins "beginning to fall off."  Its pages are punctuated with news and observations that fascinated this 14-year-old about life in internment camp: 

     June 11  New bull not as large as the old one which died of anthrax..  

      Dec. 2.  Got stoves.

 

    It's a story of relationships:

             Sunday May 12   A boy threw a stone at a Crowned Willow Warbler, and

killed it.

Thursday May 18  I put my hand into a sparrow's nest and found babies, It was at block 60 under the tiles.  I am sharing with Beard  (a class mate).

Tuesday May 23   A Jap gave us an egg so we put it under the baby  rook.

 Between the lines, it shouts triumph of the human spirit. 

March 29 Wednesday